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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Wejdan Alakaleek

The purpose of this paper is to examine the developmental level of entrepreneurship education within the context of Jordanian higher education. The level of development in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the developmental level of entrepreneurship education within the context of Jordanian higher education. The level of development in such education is investigated based on two areas: the educational courses and programs themselves and the formal structures within which they are embedded.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative approach is based on a survey scan of all 29 Jordanian universities, including their course plans, educational programs, departments and centers. A list of entrepreneurship centers, programs and course subjects is provided and analyzed.

Findings

The main findings of study are: in Jordan, entrepreneurship education is still at an early stage of development, and its offerings are limited to a few courses covering some introductory subjects in small business and entrepreneurship courses. Of the Jordanian universities, one university offers a major educational graduate program in entrepreneurship and 27.5 percent have centers for innovation and entrepreneurship, but lack any entrepreneurship departments. Entrepreneurship education is new in Jordan: the first provided course was a small business management; the first center was established in 2004 and later in 2012, it offered the first educational programs in entrepreneurship.

Research implications

This paper assists all stakeholders in higher education to build an understanding of the nature of entrepreneurship education in Jordan and supports the design of appropriate strategies for encouraging entrepreneurial subjects to be incorporated into the country’s universities educational programs.

Originality/value

The value of this study stems from its aim to provide an overview of the status of entrepreneurship education in Jordanian universities. It also makes a contribution to knowledge as the first nationwide study in this context.

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Huthaifa Al-Hazaima, Mary Low and Umesh Sharma

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of salient stakeholders in Jordan concerning the importance of integrating sustainability education (SE) into the accounting curriculum.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of salient stakeholders in Jordan concerning the importance of integrating sustainability education (SE) into the accounting curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses salient stakeholder theory as a lens and seeks to explore the possible integration of SE into the Jordanian tertiary accounting curriculum. A final sample of 702 salient stakeholders including university accounting educators, accounting students, industry accountants, government representatives and accounting association professional members were used to glean an insight of their views and the extent to which sustainability is present in accounting education.

Findings

Findings indicate that there is a strong belief by these salient stakeholders that there is significant importance for the integration of SE into the accounting curriculum in Jordanian universities. There is concern that the current curriculum does not meet the educational needs of future accountants and business executives from a sustainability perspective.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the research debate on the competencies crisis in accounting education by focusing on the lack of SE in the accounting curriculum. This study draws attention to the need of up-skilling and applied knowledge in this critical area. There are strong viewpoints from the salient stakeholders in this study. They emphasise that a progressive education solution is required and which integrates SE into the accounting curriculum.

Practical implications

The research is useful to accounting educators, professional accounting associations, industry, accounting students and the government. The salient stakeholders in Jordan wish to include SE within the accounting curriculum. This would lead to future accountants and business executives having stronger competencies to respond in a resilient and resourceful manner to changes in the way business is conducted, especially in an area where societal and environmental impacts are highly scrutinised.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence on how salient stakeholders of an emerging economy can influence, provide guidance and leadership in integrating SE in the accounting curriculum. Engaging actively and extensively with research studies such as this allows them to voice their opinions about the importance of sustainability and how their country can better engage in this increasingly important field.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Osama Abdellateef Mah’d

The aim of this research is to shed light on the role the Ministry of Higher Education & Scientific Research (MoHE) plays in private Jordanian universities (PJUs). Private…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to shed light on the role the Ministry of Higher Education & Scientific Research (MoHE) plays in private Jordanian universities (PJUs). Private universities in developing countries struggle with their financial resources. There is an argument that a decision to adopt a new approach for the financing and management of Jordanian higher education (HE) has been taken because both funding and ownership belong to private sources. However, the MoHE plays a role in the Jordanian context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explains the relations between the MoHE and PJUs and describes the PJUs’ managerial context. It is based on the prior research related to HE and budgeting. A total of 16 budget preparers at 11 universities and a further three in the MoHE were interviewed. The research also uses observation to obtain direct knowledge of the research phenomena. It uses archival documents, guidelines and reports to accomplish the study’s objective.

Findings

This research presents an overview for private HE across the world with particular concentration being paid to the role of the MoHE in PJUs by presenting the regulations and laws related to HE in Jordan. It proves that the MoHE uses a budgeting formula to significantly increase its control over the private HE sector. Simultaneously, no government subsidies or tax exemptions (such as those given to public universities) have been made available to private universities. The results indicate that the MoHE controls the private universities by using accreditation tools, such as their budgets.

Originality/value

Jordan has a unique situation in terms of the relationship between its MoHE and Jordanian universities.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Khalid Arar and Kussai Haj‐Yehia

This study aims to expand the authors’ exploratory qualitative study, describing the characteristics of the flow of Palestinian Arab citizens of Israel (PAI) to Jordanian

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to expand the authors’ exploratory qualitative study, describing the characteristics of the flow of Palestinian Arab citizens of Israel (PAI) to Jordanian higher education (HE) institutes as an alternative to HE studies in Israel (Jordanization).

Design/methodology/approach

At this stage of the study, 460 PAI studying in six Jordanian universities answered a questionnaire indicating the factors that led them to seek HE in Jordan. Respondents’ comparisons between the Israeli and Jordanian HE systems were analysed.

Findings

Results showed that Jordanian HE attracts PAIs for practical reasons: lenient acceptance policy and better chances to graduate, while cultural and linguistic similarities between the PAI and Jordanian societies are less influential. Israel's HE is attractive for financial reasons and employment qualification.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should compare the absorption of these graduates of Jordanian universities in Israel's labour market with the absorption of other graduates from Israeli and foreign universities.

Practical implications

The under‐representative proportion of PAI students in Israeli universities indicates the need for diversified programmes and reforms to bring more PAI students into Israeli campuses. Pre‐academic programmes focusing on acquisition of academic learning skills could assist PAI students during their first academic year and help prevent dropout.

Originality/value

This study provides unique and specific knowledge concerning the topic of indigenous ethnic minorities who migrate to study outside their states.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Khaled Hutaibat

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a field study, investigating accounting, strategising and accounting for strategic management and power structures…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a field study, investigating accounting, strategising and accounting for strategic management and power structures in the Jordanian higher education (HE) sector on the basis of Bourdieu’s theory of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts an interpretive stance, seeking to investigate the perceptions of actors in the field, with regard to accounting, strategising and accounting for strategic management in HE. The adopted methodology is adapted grounded theory, as this study assumes a prior theoretical stance of Bourdieu’s theoretical concepts. Data were collected through participant observation in meetings, at the workplace, interviews and documentation.

Findings

The main findings of this paper reflect how strategising and accounting in practice manifest themselves in the Jordanian HE sector. Bourdieu’s theory of practice sets the meta-theoretical context of the current study, with field setting the scene, and habitus being represented in the strategising mind-set participants adopt. The mind-set determines how strategic management accounting is perceived and dealt with. Strategic management accounting takes place at varying degrees. The power structures that influence and determine strategising and accounting in support thereof are researched on the basis of Bourdieu’s forms of capital. Different forms of capital matter in the HE sector determined by fields’ doxa.

Research limitations/implications

The researcher is a part of the field, the Jordanian HE sector; thus, their habitus has been exposed to its characteristics and features. Thus, certain internalised structures and experiences needed to be challenged for this analysis, which was not an easy task.

Originality/value

This study investigates accounting, strategic management and power structures in HE, and it highlights the different power structures, using Bourdieu’s forms of capital, which offers a great insight into how different cultures approach similar issues.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Abeer F. Alkhwaldi and Amir A. Abdulmuhsin

This paper aims to investigate the factors that affect the acceptance of distance learning systems by university academic staff and students in Jordan. To achieve this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the factors that affect the acceptance of distance learning systems by university academic staff and students in Jordan. To achieve this objective, it has been proposed to examine the distance learning experience of Jordanian Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) after the universities institution suspended face-to-face (traditional) courses delivery owing to novel Coronavirus’ (COVID-19) fears.

Design/methodology/approach

This study expands upon unified theory of acceptance and use of technology 2 by incorporating contextual variables such as trust (TR), autonomy (AUT) and compatibility (CMP). Data collection has been carried out through an online survey, which targeted participants at public and private universities during the crisis time of coronavirus. Structural equation modelling has been used to validate the proposed research model.

Findings

The outcomes revealed that performance expectancy, facilitating conditions, TR and AUT were the significant predictors of distance learning acceptance in both samples. By identifying the factors affecting the acceptance of distance learning systems, it will be more useful to offer better services of distance learning. This will also help to demonstrate that distance learning will be capable of delivering the educational aims of HEIs to areas where a pandemic outbreak in the Middle East.

Originality/value

Distance learning provides university students with quality education, engaging platforms and most significantly a safe teaching environment. The results and implications to both practice and theory are described.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Saad Zighan and Ahmed EL-Qasem

This paper explores the applications of lean thinking in re-evaluating the business school curriculum, syllabus and intended learning objectives to enhance the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the applications of lean thinking in re-evaluating the business school curriculum, syllabus and intended learning objectives to enhance the employability of graduates through identifying and eliminating non–value-added activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employed multilevel qualitative methodology, where 55 semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from academics, students and graduates from several private and public universities in Jordan.

Findings

The study finds that the application of lean thinking in the business school is twofold – it helps the developer of the school curriculum to get rid of many superfluous and non–value-added activities and also emphasises and reinforces the value-added activities. Value stream mapping, with a consideration for internal and external outputs, has been found to be a useful tool for developing an employability-focussed curriculum that equips business school students with the required competences and skills in the labour market.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a qualitative research approach. The generalisability of the findings is difficult to assess, and future research would benefit from the insights obtained from the quantitative data

Practical implications

In practice, this study has identified different types of non–value-added and unnecessary activities in business school curriculum and has made suggestions for the development of a more employability-focussed curriculum.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the non–value-added activities of the business school curriculum, syllabus and the intended learning objectives to enhance the employability of graduates in Jordan.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Abdul Razeq Mustafa Younis

The study is concerned with gathering factual data on the use of local online information systems, automation, online connections, online public access catalogs (OPACs)…

Abstract

Purpose

The study is concerned with gathering factual data on the use of local online information systems, automation, online connections, online public access catalogs (OPACs), CD‐ROM‐based systems in 19 Jordanian university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Information was sought through a written questionnaire; personal interviews; literature review, and field visits. The implementation of local online information systems; OPACs, CD‐ROM databases, online searching, networks/databases subscribed to, methods of online services to users, problems and solutions are investigated.

Findings

Of the 18 (94.7 percent) libraries responded, half (50 percent) are using MINISIS or CDS/ISIS, one‐third (33.3 percent) is using either M2L, or ORACLE based systems, and 3 (16.7 percent) are using locally designed packages. Technical processing, information retrieval, circulation, reference services, and serial control are the prime systems functions. All respondents are linked to the internet. A total of 15 (83.3 percent) respondents have developed collections of databases on CD‐ROMs; 11 (73.3 percent) use single‐ access, and four (26.7 percent) use multi‐user systems.

Practical implications

Online services are provided mostly by traditional means. Lack of skilled staff, shortages of fund, and insufficient hardware are prime obstacles hindering systems optimal utilization. Outdated databases, cost, and users incompetence are problems limiting the optimal use of online systems. Developing intranet, funding, trained manpower, training courses to users, sharing subscription expenses in electronic full‐text database, and promote cooperation to exchange OPACs records through the internet, are suggested solutions to overcome these problems.

Originality/value

Academic libraries in Jordan are changing emphasis from ownership of information sources in printed forms, to the access to online databases or local area networks systems based on CD‐ROMs, to linkage with the internet as a prime gateway to information sources.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2018

Maria Rebecca Aristorenas, Paul O’Keeffe and Oula Abu-Amsha

The war in Syria has left a trail of unprecedented displacement and disruption, and consequently the lack of higher education opportunities for tens of thousands of young…

Abstract

The war in Syria has left a trail of unprecedented displacement and disruption, and consequently the lack of higher education opportunities for tens of thousands of young Syrians. As of 2017, only 1% of the global refugee population is able to access tertiary education programs in stark contrast to the up to 26% university-level participation in Syria prior to the war.

Jamiya Project, one organization that has aimed at improving access to higher education opportunities for Syrian students in the Middle East, piloted an Introduction to Java Programming course in the Fall/Winter of 2016/2017. The course was free to access, accredited by the University of Gothenburg, taught in Arabic, and delivered through a blended learning model alongside education technology partners and non-governmental organization-facilitated learning centers on the ground. The Jamiya Project partnered with Syrian academics in exile in developing and delivering the course.

This chapter outlines the vision and the methodology behind the actions of the Jamiya Project during this pilot course and aims to share lessons learned from the experiences, reflections, and iterations of research from the course with students and academics. There is no doubt that a collaborative effort is required to mitigate the serious effects of this crisis.

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Mamoun N. Akroush, Samer M. Al-Mohammad and Abdelhadi L. Odetallah

The purpose of this paper is to examine a multidimensional model of marketing culture and performance in tourism restaurants operating in Jordan. The paper introduces a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a multidimensional model of marketing culture and performance in tourism restaurants operating in Jordan. The paper introduces a model proposing certain associations between Webster’s (1990) marketing culture dimensions and attempts to underline how such associations affect restaurants’ performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured and self-administered survey was used, targeting managers and employees of tourism restaurants operating in Jordan. A sample of 334 tourism restaurants’ managers and employees were involved in the survey. A series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the research constructs dimensions, unidimensionality, validity and composite reliability. Structural path model analysis was also used to test the hypothesised interrelationships of the research model.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that the marketing culture dimensions are seven rather than six, as proposed by Webster’s (1990) original model: service quality, interpersonal relationships, management–front-line interaction, selling task, organisation, internal communication and innovativeness. “Organisation” had positively and significantly affected “interpersonal relationships”. “Interpersonal relationships” had positively and significantly affected each of “management–front-line interaction”, “selling task” and “internal communications”. On the other hand, each of “management–front-line interaction”, “selling task” and “internal communications” had positively and significantly affected “innovativeness”. However, “innovativeness” itself had positively and significantly affected each of “service quality” and restaurant performance. Finally, “service quality” had positively and significantly affected restaurants’ performance.

Research limitations/implications

Only seven dimensions of marketing culture were examined; meanwhile, there could also be other dimensions that affect restaurants’ performance. This paper has also examined the effect of a multidimensional model of marketing culture on restaurants’ financial performance only; the use of other types of non-financial measures could yield different results. The fact that paper’s sample consisted only of Jordanian restaurants further limits its generalisation potential.

Practical implications

The paper reinforces the importance of sound marketing culture to Jordanian tourism restaurants. It further underlines the importance of several marketing culture dimensions, particularly those related to employees’ selection, development and communication. Further, the paper emphasises the particular importance of front-office employees to the success of Jordanian restaurants. Tourism restaurants’ managers and executives can benefit from such findings for designing their marketing culture strategies to achieve long-term performance objectives.

Originality/value

This paper represents the first empirical attempt to examine the interrelationships between marketing culture dimensions introduced by Webster (1990). Accordingly, it should shed more light on the dynamics of marketing culture within service organisations, and how such dynamics affect organisations’ performance. Further, the paper is the first of its kind to study marketing culture dynamics in the context of Jordanian tourism restaurants industry. International tourism restaurants planning to expand their operations in Jordan’s tourism industry have now valuable empirical evidence concerning the marketing culture dimensions and their effect on performance.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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