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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Jordan L. LeBel and Nathalie Cooke

The purpose of this research is to examine the nature of consumers' relationships with branded spokescharacters by drawing upon brand personality theory and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the nature of consumers' relationships with branded spokescharacters by drawing upon brand personality theory and reader‐response theory, focusing specifically on food trade characters. We aim to show that the persuasive power of these characters resides not only in their appearance, but also in the complex narratives consumers project (sometimes unwittingly) onto the spokescharacter.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the results of a survey – blending quantitative and qualitative methodologies – designed to document consumer perceptions, affective responses and spontaneous associations to different characters (i.e. Aunt Jemima, Robin Hood, Betty Crocker, Uncle Ben, Poppin' Fresh the Pillsbury's Doughboy, and M. Felix and Mr Norton, characters created by a Montreal‐based cookie company).

Findings

The results revealed that consumers associate spokescharacters with distinct personality profiles. Also, a connection was found between spokescharacters and narrative: a relationship where the characters become part of a larger narrative paradigm and more importantly, a relationship where the consumer is cast in a specific role vis‐à‐vis the spokescharacter.

Practical implications

These results should invite brand managers to stay current with the variety of associations that consumers form and how these associations influence the perception of their brand's personality. The results further underscore the need to understand the role into which consumers are cast vis‐à‐vis a branded character. Future research should examine cross cultural differences in the perception and narratives of branded characters, especially since many multinational companies use branded characters across cultural divides.

Originality/value

The paper shows how consumers play an active role in rendering a spokescharacter likeable, credible, and even memorable and documents the narratives that engage consumers and are both constructed collaboratively with them and propagated by them.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Wayne A. Hochwarter, Ilias Kapoutsis, Samantha L. Jordan, Abdul Karim Khan and Mayowa Babalola

Persistent change has placed considerable pressure on organizations to keep up or fade into obscurity. Firms that remain viable, or even thrive, are staffed with…

Abstract

Persistent change has placed considerable pressure on organizations to keep up or fade into obscurity. Firms that remain viable, or even thrive, are staffed with decision-makers who capably steer organizations toward opportunities and away from threats. Accordingly, leadership development has never been more critical. In this chapter, the authors propose that leader development is an inherently dyadic process initiated to communicate formal and informal expectations. The authors focus on the informal component, in the form of organizational politics, as an element of leadership that is critical to employee and company success. The authors advocate that superiors represent the most salient information source for leader development, especially as it relates to political dynamics embedded in work systems. The authors discuss research associated with our conceptualization of dyadic political leader development (DPLD). Specifically, the authors develop DPLD by exploring its conceptual underpinnings as they relate to sensemaking, identity, and social learning theories. Once established, the authors provide a refined discussion of the construct, illustrating its scholarly mechanisms that better explain leader development processes and outcomes. The authors then expand research in the areas of political skill, political will, political knowledge, and political phronesis by embedding our conceptualization of DPLD into a political leadership model. The authors conclude by discussing methodological issues and avenues of future research stemming from the development of DPLD.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Shane Connelly and Brett S. Torrence

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span…

Abstract

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span of research on emotions in the workplace encompasses a wide variety of affective variables such as emotional climate, emotional labor, emotion regulation, positive and negative affect, empathy, and more recently, specific emotions. Emotions operate in complex ways across multiple levels of analysis (i.e., within-person, between-person, interpersonal, group, and organizational) to exert influence on work behavior and outcomes, but their linkages to human resource management (HRM) policies and practices have not always been explicit or well understood. This chapter offers a review and integration of the bourgeoning research on discrete positive and negative emotions, offering insights about why these emotions are relevant to HRM policies and practices. We review some of the dominant theories that have emerged out of functionalist perspectives on emotions, connecting these to a strategic HRM framework. We then define and describe four discrete positive and negative emotions (fear, pride, guilt, and interest) highlighting how they relate to five HRM practices: (1) selection, (2) training/learning, (3) performance management, (4) incentives/rewards, and (5) employee voice. Following this, we discuss the emotion perception and regulation implications of these and other discrete emotions for leaders and HRM managers. We conclude with some challenges associated with understanding discrete emotions in organizations as well as some opportunities and future directions for improving our appreciation and understanding of the role of discrete emotional experiences in HRM.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2014

Emily C. Bouck and Sara Flanagan

The chapter Technological Advances in Special Education provides information on advances of technology and how such technological advances have influenced students with…

Abstract

The chapter Technological Advances in Special Education provides information on advances of technology and how such technological advances have influenced students with disabilities and special education across the globe. The chapter presents technological advances that benefited students with disabilities in developed countries as well as potential technologies to support students with disabilities in developing countries. The scant exiting literature on developing countries suggests some universal themes regarding technology for students with disabilities including access and training. Additional attention and research is needed on assistive technology to support students with disabilities in both developed and developing countries, with recognition that what works is developed counties may not work in developing.

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Biopsychosocial, Cultural, and Disability Aspects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-045-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Abstract

Details

Governance and Management in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-728-9

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Soo-Hoon Lee, Thomas W. Lee and Phillip H. Phan

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on…

Abstract

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on interactions between the employee and supervisor or the employee and the organizational collective. In contrast, our chapter focuses on employee prosocial advocacy voice (PAV), which the authors define as prosocial voice behaviors aimed at preventing harm or promoting constructive changes by advocating on behalf of others. In the context of a healthcare organization, low quality and unsafe patient care are salient and objectionable states in which voice can motivate actions on behalf of the patient to improve information exchanges, governance, and outreach activities for safer outcomes. The authors draw from the theory and research on responsibility to intersect with theories on information processing, accountability, and stakeholders that operate through voice between the employee-patient, employee-coworker, and employee-profession, respectively, to propose a model of PAV in patient-centered healthcare. The authors complete the model by suggesting intervening influences and barriers to PAV that may affect patient-centered outcomes.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Managing Global Sport Events: Logistics and Coordination
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-041-2

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jordan L. Le Bel

To begin a merger of prior research on service quality and experience marketing and to integrate key concepts into a comprehensive managerial framework for experience…

4348

Abstract

Purpose

To begin a merger of prior research on service quality and experience marketing and to integrate key concepts into a comprehensive managerial framework for experience marketing in the airline industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Key concepts and research from the service quality and recent experience marketing literatures are reviewed.

Findings

The framework accounts for the temporal unfolding of the air travel experience and provides a customer‐centric perspective of the air travel experience.

Originality/value

The proposed framework should assist aviation professionals in their efforts to engineer and manage the air travel experience.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Constantina Kavadas, Lea Prevel Katsanis and Jordan LeBel

The importance of consumer involvement is well recognized in marketing theory, but has been absent from past inquiries in consumers' processing of DTC advertisements. The…

3109

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of consumer involvement is well recognized in marketing theory, but has been absent from past inquiries in consumers' processing of DTC advertisements. The authors believe it is necessary to account for varying levels of involvement between consumers in order to better appreciate their responses to DTC advertisement claims. The present study aims to shed additional insight into the relationship between consumer involvement and the processing of risk information in DTC advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a between‐subject factorial design and consisted of 156 students from a North American university. It used an instructional manipulation designed to compare how low and highly involved consumers perceive DTC drug advertisements and more specifically the benefit and risk information contained in such advertisements.

Findings

Findings indicate that consumers' perception and processing of DTC advertisements resembles consumers' reaction to fear appeals. Furthermore, consistent with previous studies, consumers react negatively to DTC advertisements containing a high content of risk information. Findings indicate that greater differences in consumer processing of risk information is observed when the sample is categorized as high versus low involved, rather than sufferer versus non‐sufferer, and that this consumer characteristic is important enough to include when examining consumer reactions to DTC advertisements.

Originality/value

The relationship between amount of risk information and consumer responses has not been empirically examined while controlling for the potential role of involvement. This study is a first step in addressing this gap.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Jo Easton

Abstract

Details

Death in Custody
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-026-4

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