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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Vidmantas Tūtlys, Jonathan Winterton and Odeta Liesionienė

The purpose of this paper is to highlight systemic factors of competence-based integration of retired military officers into the civilian labour market in terms of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight systemic factors of competence-based integration of retired military officers into the civilian labour market in terms of the perspective of the institutions and institutional settings of competence involved in the formation and deployment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 25 retired military officers in Lithuania.

Findings

The main institutional problems and challenges of the competence-based labour market integration of retired military officers involve are concentrated in the fields of deployment of skills in the military service, and as well as in the adjustment of acquired skills to the requirements of the civilian labour market.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the research is the absence of perspectives and attitudes of other stakeholders such as policy makers, employers and providers of education and training.

Practical implications

Research identified expectations of retired military officers concerning improvement of training and labour market integration services.

Originality/value

The paper is focused on the institutional aspects of competence-based labour market integration of the retired military officers from their perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Chong Siew Huay, Jonathan Winterton, Yasmin Bani and Bolaji Tunde Matemilola

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of remittances on human development in developing countries using panel data from 1980 to 2014 and to address the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of remittances on human development in developing countries using panel data from 1980 to 2014 and to address the critical question of whether the increasing trend of remittances has any impact on human development in a broad range of developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Usual panel estimates, such as pooled OLS, fixed or random effects model, possess specification issues such as endogeneity, heterogeneity and measurement errors. In this paper, we, therefore, apply dynamic panel estimates – System generalised method of moment (Sys-GMM) developed by Arellano and Bond (1991) and Arellano and Bover (1995). This estimator is able to control for the endogeneity of all the explanatory variables, account for unobserved country-specific effects that cannot be done using country dummies due to the dynamic structure of the model (Azman-Saini et al., 2010).

Findings

The effect of remittances is statistically significant with positive coefficients in developing countries. The significant coefficient of remittances means that, holding other variables constant, a rise in remittance inflows is associated with improvements in human development. A 10 per cent increase in remittances will lead to an increase of approximately 0.016 per cent in human development. These findings are consistent with Üstubuci and Irdam (2012) and Adenutsi (2010), who found evidence that remittances are positively correlated with human development.

Practical implications

The paper considers implications for policymakers to justify the need for more effective approaches. Policymakers need to consider indicators of human development and to devise public policies that promote income, health and education, to enhance human development.

Originality/value

The question of whether remittances affect human development has rarely been subject to systematic empirical study. Extant research does not resolve the endogeneity problem, whereas the present study provides empirical evidence by utilising dynamic panel estimators such as Sys-GMM to tackle the specification issues of endogeneity, measurement errors and heterogeneity. The present study provides a benchmark for future research on the effect of remittances on human development.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2019

Jason J. Turner and Jonathan Winterton

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2019

Jonathan Winterton and Jason J. Turner

The purpose of this paper is to understand the concept of graduate work readiness (GWR) from a stakeholder perspective. The research attempts to pull together the various…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the concept of graduate work readiness (GWR) from a stakeholder perspective. The research attempts to pull together the various multidisciplinary themes from the literature into a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between graduates and the labour market, considering the international dimension of what is a global phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The critical review is divided into four distinct sections, the first is to contextualise the concept of GWR and graduate employability taking into account recent academic discussion, particularly in the EU and ASEAN; second, to explore the different perspectives of stakeholders in the “triple helix” of universities, governments and the corporate world; third, critically to assess the arguments that educational provision is poorly aligned with labour market needs; and finally, to investigate the implications of the fourth industrial revolution for graduate jobs and skills and propose an agenda for future research.

Findings

Despite the apparent consensus between stakeholders over the central importance of graduate employability, there is considerable diversity in how each imagines GWR is best assured.

Research limitations/implications

Any review is limited by the extant literature and whilst it is not uncommon that most research has been done in North America, Western Europe and Australasia, this is a serious limitation. GWR is a global concern and this review shows the need for more research that extends beyond the dominant geographical focus and its attendant paradigms. The implication is that geography is important and local research is needed to develop solutions that fit specific cultural, economic and institutional contexts.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the need to reconcile different stakeholder perspectives on GWR and ensure that they work together on shared agendas to improve graduate transition to the labour market. At the same time, the profound changes being brought about by the fourth industrial revolution suggest that more attention should be paid to the employability of existing employees.

Originality/value

This review should prove useful to both academics and practitioners because it emphasises the need to treat GWR as a concept that varies according to context and stakeholder interests, rather than a homogeneous phenomenon.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Jason Turner and Jonathan Winterton

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Vidmantas Tūtlys, Jonathan Winterton and Odeta Liesionienė

This paper aims to investigate issues affecting the integration of retired military officers into civilian work using a competence model as an analytical framework.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate issues affecting the integration of retired military officers into civilian work using a competence model as an analytical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines literature review with empirical study. The primary method of data collection was a series of in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 25 retired army officers in Lithuania.

Findings

Despite evidence that a career as an officer in the military develops valuable competencies that have obvious potential in the civilian labour market, the integration of retired army officers into the civilian labour market is fraught with difficulties. Apart from the obvious inappropriateness of specific competencies associated with armed combat for civilian occupations, even competencies acquired in military service that align closely with those required in civilian jobs do not necessarily translate because of different contexts and different value systems.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical basis is limited to army officers in Lithuania, and the authors urge caution in extrapolating to other military personnel and other countries. To the extent that the approach has generic value, there are clearly implications for demobilisation after major conflicts or return to civilian life of personnel involved in international peace-keeping.

Practical implications

This exploratory research suggests that a competence framework can identify limits and possibilities of aligning competencies acquired in military service with those required in civilian occupations, provided context and values are incorporated as part of the analysis. The approach piloted in this paper could be useful more widely for facilitating mobility between sectors and occupations arising from the adoption of disruptive technologies.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the value of a structured approach to comparing competencies in context and the mediating role of values in moving from military to civilian occupations.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Jonathan Winterton

The purpose of this article is to explore diversity in competence models across Europe and consider the extent to which there is sufficient common ground for a common…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore diversity in competence models across Europe and consider the extent to which there is sufficient common ground for a common European approach to underpin the European Qualifications Framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a literature review and interviews with policy makers.

Findings

Despite the central role of competence in policy initiatives, conceptual approaches to competence vary not only between but also within different member states. This diversity embodies not only language issues but also fundamental cultural differences in approaches to skill formation. Whether the models have sufficient common ground to permit a “best‐fit” European‐wide approach is open to question, although this is clearly an essential prerequisite for removing barriers to labour mobility. Despite initiatives like the European Qualifications Framework there is still no consensus for adopting a common competence model and policy discussions continue to reveal confusion.

Research limitations/implications

The focus on policy discussions at the European level may be a limitation, and readers should see this as the introductory scene setting to more detailed discussions in the following papers of important developments within member states. Beyond this, much is happening at the level of sectors and occupations that is the focus for practical implementation.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the urgent need to develop a coherent conceptual underpinning for competence descriptors in qualifications frameworks that will work as a best‐fit approach across Europe. Without this, occupational and inter‐sector mobility will be hindered.

Originality/value

The paper offers the most comprehensive assessment of European approaches to competence to date.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2020

Saad M. Alotaibi, Muslim Amin and Jonathan Winterton

The objective of this study is to investigate the role of emotional intelligence and empowering leadership in enhancing psychological empowerment and work engagement in…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to investigate the role of emotional intelligence and empowering leadership in enhancing psychological empowerment and work engagement in private hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed to staff nurses at five private hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 100 questionnaires to each hospital, with an achieved response rate of 34.8%.

Findings

The results show statistically significant positive relationships between emotional intelligence, empowering leadership, psychological empowerment and work engagement. The relationship between emotional intelligence and work engagement and psychological empowerment and work engagement were not significant.

Research limitations/implications

The study found that employees who have a high level of emotional intelligence and the positive stimulus of empowering leadership demonstrate enhanced psychological empowerment and work engagement.

Practical implications

A better understanding of the role of EI and EL in enhancing psychological empowerment and work engagement could help hospitals reduce turnover among nurses and improve their relationships with patients, as well as maintaining competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence to support the effect of EI on empowering leadership, psychological empowerment and work engagement in private hospitals.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

A conference on this theme was organised at the Cardiff Business School, 14–15th September, 1988 and a selection of abstracts of papers presented has been compiled.

Abstract

A conference on this theme was organised at the Cardiff Business School, 14–15th September, 1988 and a selection of abstracts of papers presented has been compiled.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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