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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2023

Jonathan Lean, Robert Newbery, Jonathan Moizer, Mohamed Haddoud and Wai Mun Lim

This paper investigates how individuals' decision-making approach and perceptions of a game's cognitive realism affect the performance of virtual businesses in a web-based…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates how individuals' decision-making approach and perceptions of a game's cognitive realism affect the performance of virtual businesses in a web-based simulation game.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data are collected from 274 business simulation game users and is analysed using the fsQCA technique.

Findings

The study identifies three alternative pathways to high and low performance in a business simulation game. Results indicate that a flexible decision-making approach exists in all high performance pathway solutions. Where a game is perceived to be realistic, a more focused decision-making approach is associated with high performance. However, where perceived cognitive realism is absent, a less focused experimental decision-making approach is employed, which increases the chances to achieve low performance. Finally, perceived cognitive realism and an experimental decision-making approach are found to be mutually exclusive for achieving high performance.

Originality/value

Whilst the learning benefits of web-based simulation games are widely acknowledged, the complex interplay amongst factors affecting performance in games is under-researched. Limited research exists on how perceptions of a game's cognitive realism interact with user decision-making approaches to affect performance.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Robert Newbery, Jonathan Lean and Jonathan Moizer

Serious games are playing an increasingly significant role across a range of educational contexts. Business focused serious games can provide students with an authentic learning…

1399

Abstract

Purpose

Serious games are playing an increasingly significant role across a range of educational contexts. Business focused serious games can provide students with an authentic learning experience and their use has been increasingly taken up by business school faculty, including those delivering entrepreneurship education (EE). The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of participation in a serious business game on the entrepreneurial intent (EI) of undergraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental design. It employs a modified version of Linan et al.’s (2011) EI model in the form of a questionnaire survey completed by 263 undergraduate business and management students.

Findings

A logic regression model was used to analyse the survey responses. The research findings indicate that the serious game used in this study has a significant negative impact on EI. Gender and role model effects are also identified from the analysis.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature in two ways. First, it demonstrates the impact of serious business games on EI during the enterprise awareness stage of a student’s EE. Second, it provides a foundation for exploring the role that serious games can play in educating the potential entrepreneurs of the future.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Jonathan Lean, Jonathan Moizer and Robert Newbery

The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach for utilising a critical incident method within the context of an online business simulation game in order to provide an…

1593

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach for utilising a critical incident method within the context of an online business simulation game in order to provide an effective framework for reflective learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a review of pertinent literature to place the critical incident technique within the novel context of simulation gaming. Through presenting a case study of practice, it goes on to describe a blended learning approach that combines online simulation with post-simulation reflection based on the critical incident method. An action research approach is adopted as a framework for reflection on practice.

Findings

From a conceptual perspective, there are a number of potential benefits to employing a critical incident approach combined with simulation gaming. The ability of educators to compress time frames and manage the introduction of critical incidents allows students to learn in a way that would not be possible in the real world. Furthermore, carefully designed post-simulation debriefing, structured around a critical incident framework, has the potential to enhance the learning impact of online simulation.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited in that a single case study context is described. Further evaluation research is required to fully assess the benefits of the approach adopted.

Originality/value

The study explores the use of the critical incident approach within the novel context of online simulation gaming. It provides educators with a blended learning method that can be employed to enhance the impact of e-learning through structured reflection.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Jonathan Moizer, David Carter and Shaofeng Liu

The resourcing of policing activity is characterised by a level of complexity, particularly where evaluating alternative policy options is concerned. In this paper, a case study…

Abstract

Purpose

The resourcing of policing activity is characterised by a level of complexity, particularly where evaluating alternative policy options is concerned. In this paper, a case study using multimethodological modelling to compare alterative policy choice in a group context is outlined with respect to response-patrol officer (RPO) deployment within a UK police force. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The application of a three phase modelling process is illustrated where scenario planning is used to generate the scope of the system elements to be modelled. This is followed by causal mapping to identify the barriers to improving officer resourcing, and system dynamics modelling is used to simulate the impacts of a range of policy options within this policing function. A group model building approach was applied throughout the modelling phases with an expert group to negotiate a shared view of the structure and dynamics of the resourcing policy challenges.

Findings

A fully validated system dynamics model emerged from the multi-phase modelling process which allowed a series of alternative future policy scenarios to be explored and evaluated. Useful policy insights were generated by the system dynamics simulation model which suggested more efficient rules for resource allocation in the police force’s RPO function.

Originality/value

The insights from this case study demonstrates that multi-phase modelling has potential application in policy exploration across a range of emergency service providers whose actions are governed by both variable demand and constrained supply of resource.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Martin McCracken

136

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2008

Kanghwa Choi and Soo W. Kim

This paper describes a comprehensive approach to examine how technological innovation contributes to the renewal of a firm’s competences through its dynamic and reciprocal…

Abstract

This paper describes a comprehensive approach to examine how technological innovation contributes to the renewal of a firm’s competences through its dynamic and reciprocal relationship with R&D and product commercialization. Three theories of technology and innovation (the R&D and technological knowledge concept, product‐process concept, technological interdependence concept) are used to relate technology and innovation to strategic management. Based on these theories, this paper attempts to identify the dynamic relationship between product innovation and process innovation using system dynamics by investigating that aspect of the dynamic changes in the closed feedback circulation structure in which R&D investments drive the accumulation of technological knowledge.

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Christopher Patterson, Jonathan Williams and Robert S.P. Jones

There is growing literature on the application of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) with adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs). To draw upon the evidence-base from…

319

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing literature on the application of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) with adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs). To draw upon the evidence-base from mainstream approaches, adapted interventions must remain true to their theoretical foundations and retain key components. The purpose of this paper was to establish the extent to which DBT has been adapted for adults with ID, and whether existing adapted protocols can still be considered DBT.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical underpinnings and key components of DBT were identified. Six DBT studies were critiqued according to these criteria.

Findings

In terms of content, only one intervention comprised all necessary elements. All of the remaining interventions included a skills group; two included individual therapy and another two included group consultation. None of the remaining interventions provided 24-h telephone support. Furthermore, none of the studies explicitly described using dialectical strategies.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to critically examine the evidence-base for the use of DBT in ID, particularly its fidelity.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 January 2023

Daniel James Acton, Robert Waites, Sujeet Jaydeokar and Steven Jones

This paper aims to understand the lived experience of people with intellectual disability of their anxiety and of being co-design partners in developing a multi-component approach…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the lived experience of people with intellectual disability of their anxiety and of being co-design partners in developing a multi-component approach to the management of anxiety.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of an anxiety manual and programme was part of a service development which allowed existing and established psychological therapies to be adapted for people with intellectual disability. A qualitative approach was used to better understand the views of people who experienced anxiety on a daily basis. The feedback generated was used to make modifications to the manuals and the anxiety management programme.

Findings

The study has demonstrated the value of involving people with intellectual disability in the co-production of an anxiety management programme. Additional findings identified the real-life challenges and experiences of the impact anxiety has on people’s lives.

Originality/value

To our knowledge, this is the first study to involve people with intellectual disability in developing an anxiety management programme as co-production partners. This paper underlines the value of understanding and involving people as co-production partners in developing clinical interventions.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Feng Chen, Xingqiang Du, Shaojuan Lai and Mary Ma

From the sociolinguistic perspective, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether the honorific and actual-name appellations that Chinese auditors use to address clients in…

Abstract

Purpose

From the sociolinguistic perspective, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether the honorific and actual-name appellations that Chinese auditors use to address clients in audit reports connote differential financial misstatement risk. Specifically, the authors hypothesize that auditors’ use of honorifics signals their inferior social status relative to their clients, thereby leading to compromised auditor independence, lower audit quality, and higher financial misstatement risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a sample of manually coded appellation data from audit reports of Chinese public firms between 2003 and 2012 to conduct the research.

Findings

The authors find significantly greater financial misstatements, both in terms of likelihoods and magnitudes, for companies addressed by honorifics than for those addressed by actual names. Moreover, compared to auditors’ consistent honorific usage, discretionary honorific usage has a stronger positive association with misstatements. The authors further show that the positive association between honorific usage and client misstatement risk weakens when the audit firm is a Top 10 accounting firms in China, is an industry specialist, is formed as a partnership, or resides in a more concentrated audit market.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the sociolinguistics literature in accounting and provides evidence supporting the reform proposed by the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board to enhance the usefulness of audit reporting.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

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