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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Zeibeda (Zeb) Sattar, Stephanie Wilkie and Jonathan Ling

This paper aims to explore residents' perceptions of a refurbishment programme to sheltered housing schemes and its impact on their well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore residents' perceptions of a refurbishment programme to sheltered housing schemes and its impact on their well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology draws upon a realist evaluation framework. Four participatory appraisals (PAs) and 19 interviews with residents were conducted in the sheltered housing schemes. Ages of participants ranged from 50 to 99 years.

Findings

Two categories of residents were identified: healthy active older adults and older frail adults (or over 85+). Residents said their social and emotional well-being improved from the provision of indoor and outdoor communal areas. Older frail residents only accessed the new communal spaces when staff took them in their wheelchairs. The physical changes increased opportunities for social connections for residents. Conservatories and sensory gardens were most popular. Residents felt that structured activities in the new spaces and digital training would improve their social activities.

Research limitations/implications

The participatory methods spanned over an hour, and some residents felt too tired to complete the full session.

Practical implications

A practical limitation was that some sensory rooms were not fully completed at the time of the evaluation.

Originality/value

This paper adds the following: Perceptions of residents of a refurbishment programme in sheltered housing and the impact on their well-being. Perceptions of residents about social activities after a refurbishment programme. Perceptions of residents about the impact of physical changes to their sheltered housing schemes and impact on their internal accessibility to the improvements.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

David Gerrard, Jennifer Rhodes, Ruth Lee and Jonathan Ling

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if positive behavioural support (PBS) can be an effective alternative to medication, and can aid medication reduction in people…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if positive behavioural support (PBS) can be an effective alternative to medication, and can aid medication reduction in people with a learning disability, autism or both who are prescribed psychotropic medication for behaviour thought to be challenging. STOMP is an initiative supported by NHS England which aims to reduce inappropriate prescribing of psychotropic medication, i.e. antipsychotics used for challenging behaviour in the absence of a documented mental health diagnosis. PBS has been described as the first line of intervention for behaviours which challenge, (NICE, 2015) and has been highlighted as a non-pharmacological alternative to, medication.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-group, experimental design was utilised. Both groups were considered for medication reduction. The experimental group of 25 people received input from a specialist PBS team, while the control group of 29 people underwent unsupported medication challenge.

Findings

There was a significantly higher success rate for medication reduction and discontinuation when PBS assessment and intervention was provided as an alternative to medication.

Practical implications

This study indicates that providing PBS is associated with decreased medication and if replicated should be become standard practice for specialist teams.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the effect of PBS on medication reduction in patients prescribed psychotropic medication for behaviour thought to be challenging.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Joy Akehurst, Paul Stronge, Karen Giles and Jonathon Ling

The aim of this action research was to explore, from a workforce and a patient/carer perspective, the skills and the capacity required to deliver integrated care and to…

1129

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this action research was to explore, from a workforce and a patient/carer perspective, the skills and the capacity required to deliver integrated care and to inform future workforce development and planning in a new integrated care system in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with primary, community, acute care, social care and voluntary care, frontline and managerial staff and with patients and carers receiving these services were undertaken. Data were explored using framework analysis.

Findings

Analysis revealed three overarching themes: achieving teamwork and integration, managing demands on capacity and capability and delivering holistic and user-centred care. An organisational development (OD) process was developed as part of the action research process to facilitate the large-scale workforce changes taking place.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not consider workforce development and planning challenges for nursing and care staff in residential, nursing care homes or domiciliary services. This part of the workforce is integral to the care pathways for many patients, and in line with the current emerging national focus on this sector, these groups require further examination. Further, data explore service users' and carers' perspectives on workforce skills. It proved challenging to recruit patient and carer respondents for the research due to the nature of their illnesses.

Practical implications

Many of the required skills already existed within the workforce. The OD process facilitated collaborative learning to enhance skills; however, workforce planning across a whole system has challenges in relation to data gathering and management. Ensuring a focus on workforce development and planning is an important part of integrated care development.

Social implications

This study has implications for social and voluntary sector organisations in respect of inter-agency working practices, as well as the identification of workforce development needs and potential for informing subsequent cross-sector workforce planning arrangements and communication.

Originality/value

This paper helps to identify the issues and benefits of implementing person-centred, integrated teamworking and the implications for workforce planning and OD approaches.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Paul van Schaik and Jonathan Ling

Previous research has highlighted the importance of system response time (SRT) for Web usability. In the present study, this parameter was studied using a choice reaction…

650

Abstract

Previous research has highlighted the importance of system response time (SRT) for Web usability. In the present study, this parameter was studied using a choice reaction task to assess the effect on both performance and subjective measures. Results showed that SRT variability had no effect on usability when using text displays and, although Web experience increased speed of task performance, this did not affect perceptions of SRT. Presents implications for Web server design and future research into SRT.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2018

Jonathan K.M. Lian and Florence Y.Y. Ling

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the job satisfaction level of quantity surveyors (QSs); identify the personal characteristics that influence their job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the job satisfaction level of quantity surveyors (QSs); identify the personal characteristics that influence their job satisfaction; and provide recommendations to employers on how to enhance job satisfaction of QSs with different personal characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire to QSs in Singapore.

Findings

QSs feel that they have significantly high passion for the job, are significantly satisfied with task variety and are treated fairly. However, they are significantly dissatisfied with their workload, hours worked, and lack of work-life balance. QSs in upper management have significantly higher job passion. Those in mid-management are more dissatisfied with their income. QSs who are married/attached, older, and more experienced are significantly more dissatisfied with their workload and hours worked than singles, younger, and less experienced QSs.

Research limitations/implications

Some dimensions of job satisfaction were not measured. Non-personal characteristics such as type of projects handled and type of clients were not investigated.

Practical implications

Employers should investigate what goes into QSs’ workload, and weed out those that are of low value and unproductive in order to reduce their workload and hours worked, and thereby increase their job satisfaction.

Social implications

The study contributes to human resource management by identifying the type of QSs who are more likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs.

Originality/value

This study shows that personal differences of QSs affect different dimensions of their job satisfaction. To maximize job satisfaction, employers could choose QSs who have specific characteristics, make changes to the work environment or redesign their jobs.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Jonathan K.M. Lian, Zhi Yu Foo and Florence Yean Yng Ling

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the value of internships for professional careers in the built environment (BE) sector from the perspective of industry…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the value of internships for professional careers in the built environment (BE) sector from the perspective of industry practitioners. It examines the perceptions of practitioners about internship and explores the relevance of internships for professional careers in the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methods used were questionnaire survey, in-depth interviews and focus group discussion. The study focussed on careers such as architects, civil engineers, facility managers, project managers and quantity surveyors.

Findings

It was found that quantity surveyors and civil engineers value internship the most and are more likely to hire those who interned with them. Project managers also value internships but to a lesser extent. Facility managers and architects value internship the least and are also least likely to offer positions to their ex-interns. It is not conclusive whether internships are absolutely necessary to increase undergraduates’ employability upon their graduation.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to only five professions and focused on the perceptions of professionals and not the interns or academic supervisors.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made to improve internship programmes in the BE sector. These include making internships compulsory for students who intend to pursue civil engineering and quantity surveying careers and extending the duration of internships to six months.

Originality/value

The views of professionals in the BE sector are uncovered. Tertiary institutions can use the findings to improve their internship programmes and their students’ employability upon graduation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Designing XR: A Rhetorical Design Perspective for the Ecology of Human+Computer Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-366-6

Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2005

Shu-Ling Lin

The current work studies the cause, process, and effects of financial reform in 10 countries in Eastern Asia for the period of 1993–2002, especially focusing upon…

Abstract

The current work studies the cause, process, and effects of financial reform in 10 countries in Eastern Asia for the period of 1993–2002, especially focusing upon comparisons between pre- and post-Asia financial crisis. This study utilizes Mann–Whitney U test and Intervention Analysis to explore the different effects of the changes of GDP, stock index, exchange rate, CPI index, and the changes of the unemployment rate before and after the Asia financial crisis. It shows the consistent relationship between stock index, exchange rate, CPI index, and the changes of unemployment rate.

Details

Asia Pacific Financial Markets in Comparative Perspective: Issues and Implications for the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-258-0

Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2005

Abstract

Details

Asia Pacific Financial Markets in Comparative Perspective: Issues and Implications for the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-258-0

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Yona Lunsky, Ami Tint, Jonathan A. Weiss, Anna Palucka and Elspeth Bradley

Past research has shown individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) visit hospital emergency departments (ED) at high rates. In order to assist individuals with ASD…

Abstract

Purpose

Past research has shown individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) visit hospital emergency departments (ED) at high rates. In order to assist individuals with ASD, their families and health care providers to improve ED care, it is important to understand these encounters in greater detail. The purpose of this paper is to provide a descriptive summary of the ED experiences of adolescents and adults with ASD, from the perspective of their families.

Design/methodology/approach

A subset of data from a larger prospective cohort study was used. Specifically, 46 parents of adolescents and adults with ASD provided details concerning 49 ED visits over a 12-month period.

Findings

Results suggest a range of presentations requiring ED use, and also diverse profiles of those with ASD who visited the ED, in terms of age, gender, and ASD severity. While overall degree of satisfaction with care received in the ED was high, parents provided recommendations to improve the ED experiences for their family members with ASD.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide detailed accounts of ED visits from the perspective of parents of adolescents and adults with ASD. Families play an important role in the lives of individuals with ASD across the lifespan and it is important to include their perspective to improve hospital-based care for those with ASD.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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