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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Jonathan Ivy

The purpose of this paper is to present a new marketing mix based on MBA students' attitudes and opinions towards the marketing initiatives of business schools in South…

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58384

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a new marketing mix based on MBA students' attitudes and opinions towards the marketing initiatives of business schools in South Africa. The post‐graduate business education market is, and increasingly, getting more aggressive in their efforts to attract students on to their flagship degree, the MBA. The traditional marketing tools historically grouped into 4Ps (product, price, place and promotion), 5Ps (adding people) and 7Ps (adding physical facilities and processes) may be wanting in this market.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken was a quantitative survey of students registered at state subsidized universities in South Africa.

Findings

The factor analysed data showed seven quite distinct underlying factors in the marketing activities of these business schools, some covering the same elements of the traditional marketing mix: people, promotion, and price. There were, however, four different elements: programme, prominence, prospectus, and premiums.

Research limitations/implications

While the survey included only MBA students from a sample drawn in South Africa, the study does highlight the fact that the traditional services marketing mix may not be as useful to the higher education sector as it might have been originally thought.

Practical implications

The development of marketing strategy may be better served by this 7P model rather than the services mix.

Originality/value

This paper presents the underlying factors that form the basis of a new marketing mix specifically for MBA recruitment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Jonathan Ivy

This paper aims to determine the role of ethnic origin on university application among Leicester college students.

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2508

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the role of ethnic origin on university application among Leicester college students.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a quantitative survey of 427 students in sixth form colleges in Leicester.

Findings

Five distinct motivational factors were derived from a survey of 427 sixth form college students in Leicester (UK). For all ethnic groups, the student's career is the most important motivating factor; the other motivators are, however, more varied. The influence of the family was most important among Pakistani and African students. Indian and “other” Asian students were most strongly associated with academic and social motivators. White applicants, on the other hand, had no relative strengths with regard to common motivators. What was perhaps more apparent was how unimportant family was on influencing choice. There were also differences between the ethnic groups and the university type applied for. While Afro‐Caribbeans had 100 per cent acceptance to the universities they chose, they were least likely to apply at “pre‐1992” universities. In spite of having the lowest UCAS points score, African students were most likely to apply for and be accepted at “old” universities. Whites (with the best academic performance) were the least likely group to be accepted at the universities (predominantly pre‐1992 institution) at which they applied.

Research limitations/implications

The survey only considered students at sixth form colleges; it excluded those A level students at comprehensive or fee paying schools.

Practical implications

Widening participation remains on the agenda for many universities. Having a fuller understanding of ethnic minorities' influences in university choice will better enable universities to develop marketing programmes for their recruitment.

Originality/value

Since the adoption of Widening Participation initiatives, the profile of applications through UCAS has changed. The study revisits ethnic group motivations to apply to UCAS for university entrance.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Ian Hesketh, Cary L. Cooper and Jonathan Ivy

The purpose of this paper is to examine and report how the construct of “Well-being” is being recognised within the public services. Using research conducted in a northern…

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312

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and report how the construct of “Well-being” is being recognised within the public services. Using research conducted in a northern provincial police force in the UK the paper explores the issues that may contribute to sickness absence, presenteeism and leaveism; a recently described manifestation of workload overload. As sweeping public sector reform results in reduced workforce and potentially static demand, the question asked here is, “how do organisations adapt to the shifting landscape and retain employee engagement in the workplace?”

Design/methodology/approach

The study used A Short Stress Evaluation Tool to assess the risk of stress in the workforce. The questionnaire employed an online self-administered survey and collected data from 155 respondents on stress perceptions, health, attitude towards the organisation, job satisfaction and commitment to the organisation.

Findings

Sickness absence figures receive detailed attention when it comes to managing employees, but they may not represent a reliable picture. In this study one-third of respondents indicated that they had taken leave when they had actually been ill or injured; leaveism. The concept of leaveism does not currently appear within sickness absence reporting mechanisms, and the authors would suggest that the omission of this concept leaves a lacuna in current thinking that may have significant impact on both individual and organisational performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research clearly shows that the issue of leaveism is a valid concept and has potentially far-reaching consequences. This study has only touched on the first (of three) of the leaveism behaviours and is conducted solely in a policing environment (although non-warranted employees are included in the research cohort). Further research could include attempts to quantify elements two and three of leaveism, and explore to what extent these may impact on organisations undergoing public sector reform.

Practical implications

Previous studies have highlighted the negative health effects on “stayers” in public sector downsizing exercises. This in turn raises the question of just how these “survivors” cope with the new regime; with potentially more work and less pay. The authors ask what behaviour cuts of this magnitude will eventually drive when the dust settles? As a consequence could the authors see an end to the practice of leaveism? In which case the authors could make the assumption that (in its first form) it may convert to sickness absenteeism? With a third of people surveyed conceding to the practice, this has far-reaching consequences. In comparison to presenteeism, which has no overt costs, this scenario presents an entirely different fiscal proposition.

Originality/value

Leaveism, a recently described and under researched phenomenon, is a hidden source of potential abstractions from the workplace, and could impact enormously on organisational effectiveness. The motivation for the practice is unclear, and could be a manifestation of loyalty, enjoyment or duty. It could also be construed as a reaction to fear of job loss, redundancy or down grade. Whatever the underlying reason this study clearly illustrates the potentially harmful consequences to (public sector) organisations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Jonathan Ivy

“Create an image for your company or your competitors will do it for you.” In the higher education sector this statement by Keever is equally true; as competition for…

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10304

Abstract

“Create an image for your company or your competitors will do it for you.” In the higher education sector this statement by Keever is equally true; as competition for students increases and funding decreases universities and technikons need to create and maintain a distinctive image in the market place. Higher education institutions are becoming increasingly aggressive in their marketing activities to convey an image that is favourable to their public, be they prospective students, employers, funders etc. Investigates how marketing is used to convey higher education institution type image in the UK and South Africa. Using correspondence analysis, shows the unique positionings that have been created by the old UK universities, the new UK universities, South African universities and technikons. Also identifies which marketing tools these institution types use in conveying their institutional image.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Pete Naudé and Jonathan Ivy

Universities in the UK are facing huge changes to their environment, in terms of both supply of funding and level of demand for their courses. One of the most dramatic…

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8580

Abstract

Universities in the UK are facing huge changes to their environment, in terms of both supply of funding and level of demand for their courses. One of the most dramatic recent changes has been the alteration in status of the former polytechnics to fully fledged universities. In order to find out how both old and new universities are responding to this rapidly changing environment, we sent questionnaires to a number of senior staff. Based on 131 responses (81 from old universities, 50 from new), we have been able to paint a picture of how marketing is undertaken in these two segments. We report on how these institutions perceive their marketing task, and also the extent to which these two traditionally different sectors agree on the role marketing plays in their sector. Our research clearly indicates these two groups of institutions have fundamentally different approaches to operationalising their marketing strategies.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Paul Gibbs

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600

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

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313

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Brian Roberts

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597

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Stephanie Brown

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303

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Julia Ivy

Abstract

Details

Crafting Your Edge for Today's Job Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-298-6

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