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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Jonathan Glazzard

Supporting the mental health of children and young people is a global priority. The issue is not specific to England. However, evidence suggests that one in ten children…

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Abstract

Purpose

Supporting the mental health of children and young people is a global priority. The issue is not specific to England. However, evidence suggests that one in ten children and young people in England has a mental health need. This represents approximately three students in every classroom. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of schools in supporting children and young people’s mental health. Whilst the paper acknowledges that teachers are not trained health professionals, it is argued that a whole-school approach to mental health can support individuals in schools to remain mentally healthy. The elements of a whole-school approach are identified and discussed and some of the challenges in relation to implementation are considered. Critical to the development of a whole-school approach is the commitment from the school leadership team to promoting student and staff wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a policy paper not an empirical study.

Findings

This paper has outlined the policy context in the UK in relation to children and young people’s mental health. It has addressed the risk and protective factors which can cause or mitigate against mental ill health and it has outlined the elements of a whole-school approach to mental health.

Originality/value

This paper explores the contribution that schools can make to supporting students’ mental health. There is limited research which addresses mental health in young people from a non-therapeutic angle.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Jonathan Glazzard, Anthea Rose and Paul Ogilvie

A peer-mentoring scheme was implemented in a secondary school using a physical activity (PA) intervention to improve mental health outcomes of students who were at risk of…

Abstract

Purpose

A peer-mentoring scheme was implemented in a secondary school using a physical activity (PA) intervention to improve mental health outcomes of students who were at risk of developing mental ill health. These students are referred to as mentees. The evaluation was a qualitative design using focus groups and semi-structured interviews. The participants reported an increase in PA in both peer mentors and mentees. By the end of the project many of the mentees recognised that they had increased their levels of PA, they were more aware of the benefits of PA and the relationship between PA and their mental health. In addition, mentees reported feeling more confident and were more confident in forming social relationships. Peer mentors reported developing many leadership skills during the project. These included improved communication, confidence, empathy for others, relationship building and improved self-awareness. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were primarily collected from nine case study schools. Each visit included interviews with peer mentors, mentees and the Wellbeing Champion.

Findings

Mentees developed improved social confidence and were generally more positive after completing the intervention. Mentors developed leadership skills and greater empathy for their peers.

Originality/value

There is limited research on school-based PA interventions using peer mentoring to improve students’ mental health.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Jonathan Glazzard and Anthea Rose

The study was based around the following three research questions: What factors affect teacher well-being and mental health? How does teacher well-being and mental health…

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913

Abstract

Purpose

The study was based around the following three research questions: What factors affect teacher well-being and mental health? How does teacher well-being and mental health impact on the progress of students? What resilience strategies are used by highly effective teachers with poor mental health to ensure that their students thrive? The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study was qualitative in nature and involved ten primary schools in England. Teachers and head teachers were interviewed. Each school visit also included a pupil discussion group with children from Years 3. In total, the research team interviewed 35 education professionals and 64 pupils.

Findings

Teachers reported a number of work-related stress triggers including busy times of the year, such as assessment periods, the pressure of extra curricula activities, the unexpected, keeping up with the pace of change and changes in school leadership. Children were attuned to their teacher’s mood and could usually pick up when they were feeling stressed, even if teachers tried to hide it.

Originality/value

No studies have used pupil voice to explore pupil perspectives of the impact of teacher mental health on their learning and progress. This is the first study of its kind.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Neil Quinn and Lee Knifton

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151

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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