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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Tim Gorichanaz, Jonathan Furner, Lai Ma, David Bawden, Lyn Robinson, Dominic Dixon, Ken Herold, Sille Obelitz Søe, Betsy Van der Veer Martens and Luciano Floridi

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss Luciano Floridi’s 2019 book The Logic of Information: A Theory of Philosophy as Conceptual Design, the latest instalment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss Luciano Floridi’s 2019 book The Logic of Information: A Theory of Philosophy as Conceptual Design, the latest instalment in his philosophy of information (PI) tetralogy, particularly with respect to its implications for library and information studies (LIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Nine scholars with research interests in philosophy and LIS read and responded to the book, raising critical and heuristic questions in the spirit of scholarly dialogue. Floridi responded to these questions.

Findings

Floridi’s PI, including this latest publication, is of interest to LIS scholars, and much insight can be gained by exploring this connection. It seems also that LIS has the potential to contribute to PI’s further development in some respects.

Research limitations/implications

Floridi’s PI work is technical philosophy for which many LIS scholars do not have the training or patience to engage with, yet doing so is rewarding. This suggests a role for translational work between philosophy and LIS.

Originality/value

The book symposium format, not yet seen in LIS, provides forum for sustained, multifaceted and generative dialogue around ideas.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Jonathan Furner‐Hines and Peter Willett

This article presents a summary of the major findings of a survey of the use of hypertext systems and the production of hypertext products in UK libraries. Not…

Abstract

This article presents a summary of the major findings of a survey of the use of hypertext systems and the production of hypertext products in UK libraries. Not surprisingly, academic libraries are found to be both the most enthusiastic users and producers. The survey concludes that there are normally four principal stages in a library's development of a hypertext system, although the possibility of leapfrogging via the World Wide Web is acknowledged.

Details

VINE, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Jonathan Furner

Image collections of various types are maintained by organisations of all sizes, in all sectors. The term ‘picture library’ is commonly used to refer to a commercial…

Abstract

Image collections of various types are maintained by organisations of all sizes, in all sectors. The term ‘picture library’ is commonly used to refer to a commercial operation that sells access to a large archive of photographic images: well‐known examples are Getty Images and Corbis. Collections that are smaller in size but equivalent in function are to be found in private‐ and public‐sector institutions everywhere. These collections may be further categorised on the basis of:

Details

VINE, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Jonathan Furner

In a widely‐publicised article in Business Week magazine, three American journalists pose the rhetorical question ‘What's wrong with the Internet?’, and give three pithy…

Abstract

In a widely‐publicised article in Business Week magazine, three American journalists pose the rhetorical question ‘What's wrong with the Internet?’, and give three pithy responses with the intention of summarising the opinion of millions of network users around the world. Firstly, they argue, ‘it's too slow’: people are fed up with the ‘World Wide Wait’. Secondly, ‘it's not built right’: security is poor, support for multimedia is weak, and charging for usage is problematic. And thirdly, ‘good stuff is hard to find’: a commonly quoted aphorism characterises the Internet as a library where the shelves keep moving, where there is no catalogue, and where an extra lorry‐load of books is dumped in the entrance hall every five minutes.

Details

VINE, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Jonathan Furner‐Hines and Peter Willett

We have recently completed a survey of the use of hypertext systems in academic, public and special libraries within the United Kingdom. A questionnaire and both telephone…

Abstract

We have recently completed a survey of the use of hypertext systems in academic, public and special libraries within the United Kingdom. A questionnaire and both telephone and face‐to‐face interviews revealed that the largest application of such systems in academic libraries is the use of the World‐Wide Web for networked document retrieval. This paper discusses the current usage of the World‐Wide Web by academic library services, illustrating the range of facilities that libraries are starting to make available to their users.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

David Ellis, Nigel Ford and Jonathan Furner

For the purposes of this article, the indexing of information is interpreted as the pre‐processing of information in order to enable its retrieval. This definition thus…

Abstract

For the purposes of this article, the indexing of information is interpreted as the pre‐processing of information in order to enable its retrieval. This definition thus spans a dimension extending from classification‐based approaches (pre‐co‐ordinate) to keyword searching (post‐co‐ordinate). In the first section we clarify our use of terminology, by briefly describing a framework for modelling IR systems in terms of sets of objects, relationships and functions. In the following three sections, we discuss the application of indexing functions to document collections of three specific types: (1) ‘conventional’ text databases; (2) hypertext databases; and (3) the World Wide Web, globally distributed across the Internet.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

DAVID ELLIS, JONATHAN FURNER‐HINES and PETER WILLETT

An important stage in the process of retrieval of objects from a hypertext database is the creation of a set of inter‐nodal links that are intended to represent the…

Abstract

An important stage in the process of retrieval of objects from a hypertext database is the creation of a set of inter‐nodal links that are intended to represent the relationships existing between objects; this operation is often undertaken manually, just as index terms are often manually assigned to documents in a conventional retrieval system. Studies of conventional systems have suggested that a degree of consistency in the terms assigned to documents by indexers is positively associated with retrieval effectiveness. It is thus of interest to investigate the consistency of assignment of links in separate hypertext versions of the same full‐text document, since a measure of agreement may be related to the subsequent utility of the resulting hypertext databases. The calculation of values indicating the degree of similarity between objects is a technique that has been widely used in the fields of textual and chemical information retrieval; in this paper, we describe the application of arithmetic coefficients and topological indices to the measurement of the degree of similarity between the sets of inter‐nodal links in hypertext databases. We publish the results of a study in which several different sets of links are inserted, by different people, between the paragraphs of each of a number of full‐text documents. Our results show little similarity between the sets of links identified by different people; this finding is comparable with those of studies of inter‐indexer consistency, where it has been found that there is generally only a low level of agreement between the sets of index terms assigned to a document by different indexers.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2016

Michelle Caswell and Ricardo L. Punzalan

The purpose of this chapter is to delineate a number of factors unique to archives that problematize commonly accepted rhetoric in library and information studies (LIS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to delineate a number of factors unique to archives that problematize commonly accepted rhetoric in library and information studies (LIS).

Methodology/approach

This study reports on an analysis of several core concepts in archival studies (evidence, access, and power) and delineates how such concepts differ from dominant conceptions in the study of libraries.

Findings

Our research shows how archives call into question three dominant discursive tropes in LIS: the primacy of informational value (as opposed to evidential value in archives); universal access as a professional and ethical obligation; and the assumption that information institutions are universally benevolent. Although such tropes have been increasingly challenged by growing numbers of critical LIS scholars, we argue that they remain dominant discursive formations in LIS and reflect key areas of divergence that differentiate archives from libraries and distinguish the professional ethos of archivists and librarians.

Originality/value

This is the first chapter to delineate how archives differ from libraries in regard to human rights concerns and will spark discussion about such differences between the fields.

Details

Perspectives on Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-057-2

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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