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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Jonathan Cooper and Lloyd Dingle

This paper is concerned with the theoretical and practical engineering development issues, necessary for the design, build and test of an afterburner thrust augmentation…

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6679

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is concerned with the theoretical and practical engineering development issues, necessary for the design, build and test of an afterburner thrust augmentation system for a model aircraft gas turbine engine.

Design/methodology/approach

Research into key combustion parameters including, flame holder diameter, flame holder edge velocity, burner velocity and equivalence ratio were undertaken. This information was used as the basis for the design and fabrication of the afterburner combustion system. The after burner system had been designed to fit a Wren MW54 model gas turbine engine, that included FADEC control for the mother engine. Substantial testing of the afterburner system was undertaken.

Findings

Changes in “dry” and “wet” jet efflux temperature while the engine is accelerating from idle to full power are found. The increase in temperature between the dry and wet case are not markedly different, demonstrating the poor quality of the afterburner flame: the testing of the afterburner system resulted in limited flame substantiation being achieved.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required and is currently being undertaken, into the computational modelling of fuel atomisation issues and further engineering of the fuel injection system.

Practical implications

This afterburner design may eventually be adopted by Wren Turbines for economic production.

Originality/value

Provides further information on the engineering and efficiency problems associated with very small‐scale gas turbine engines.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 77 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Stefano Folletti, Giampiero Giacomello and Jonathan Cooper

The restrictive legislation on recruitment in Italy is a well‐knownexample of state control of a labour market; the means Italian companiesemploy to get round the…

Abstract

The restrictive legislation on recruitment in Italy is a well‐known example of state control of a labour market; the means Italian companies employ to get round the legislation is, if anything, even more interesting. Problems are recognised by the government and in mid‐1991 the legislation was “reformed”. A detailed study of the working of the old legislation and the situation which led to its reform concludes that although the latest law is a step forward it amounts to a missed opportunity.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

James Campbell Quick, David Mack, Joanne H Gavin, Cary L Cooper and Jonathan D Quick

The occupational stress and well-being literature often focuses on specific causes of stress as health risk factors to be managed, on attributes of work environments that…

Abstract

The occupational stress and well-being literature often focuses on specific causes of stress as health risk factors to be managed, on attributes of work environments that are stressful and/or risky, or on prevention and intervention strategies for managing these causes of stress as well as individual stress responses at work (Quick & Tetrick, 2003). The occupational stress literature has not focused on how executives and organizations can cause positive stress for people at work. In this chapter, we explore a principle-based framework for executive action to create positive, constructive stress for people at work.

The first major section of the chapter discusses seven contextual factors within which the principle-based framework is nested. The second major section of the chapter develops nine principles for executive action. The third and concluding section of the chapter turns the focus to a set of guidelines for executive action in managing their personal experience of stress.

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Stuart Hannabuss

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Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Markus J. Milne and Suzana Grubnic

This paper aims to set out several of the key issues and areas of the inter‐disciplinary field of climate change research based in accounting and accountability, and to…

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7077

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to set out several of the key issues and areas of the inter‐disciplinary field of climate change research based in accounting and accountability, and to introduce the papers that compose this AAAJ special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview of issues in the science of climate, as well as an eclectic collection of independent and inter‐disciplinary contributions to accounting for climate change. Through additional accounting analysis, and a shadow carbon account, it also illustrates how organisations and nations account for and communicate their greenhouse gas (GHG) footprints and emissions behaviour.

Findings

The research shows that accounting for carbon and other GHG emissions is immensely challenging because of uncertainties in estimation methods. The research also shows the enormity of the challenge associated with reducing those emissions in the near future.

Originality/value

The paper surveys past work on a wide variety of perspectives associated with climate change science, politics and policy, as well as organisational and national emissions and accounting behaviour. It provides an overview of challenges in the area, and seeks to set an agenda for future research that remains interesting and different.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Brian H. Rudall

This paper details advances in biocybernetics and gives reports and surveys of selected research and development in systems and cybernetics. They include supercomputers…

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627

Abstract

This paper details advances in biocybernetics and gives reports and surveys of selected research and development in systems and cybernetics. They include supercomputers, biometric technology, formal methods, applications of nanotechnology, innovations, and cybercriminals.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Vivek Kapur, Jeffere Ferris, John Juliano and Saul J. Berman

This study of the growth history and practices of 1,238 companies over a decade by the IBM Institute for Business Value found that top growth companies excel in three

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4311

Abstract

Purpose

This study of the growth history and practices of 1,238 companies over a decade by the IBM Institute for Business Value found that top growth companies excel in three vital areas: course, capability and conviction. IBM calls this the “3Cs model.”

Design/methodology/approach

The IBM research team developed a database of growth and shareholder return performance for companies included in the S&P Global 1200. Starting with the 2003 list, the team added the firms that “fell off” the listing over the preceding decade. The study worked with a final list of 1,238 companies with complete data over the decade. Collectively, this group recorded median annual revenue growth of 8.5 percent and median TSR growth of 8.8 percent.

Findings

The most successful growers: have a clear point of view on their industry, addressing both where it is headed and how they will create value in its new form or environment; are iconoclasts who evolve their product‐market portfolio on an ongoing basis; sustain the growth quest by developing multiple growth initiatives that are backed by ongoing cost and asset management to create funding; foster a culture that responds to the necessity of change, and a cadre of leaders with the passion and follow through to make the change stick

Research limitations/implications

The article provides a sound intellectual background for researchers who want to compile in‐depth case studies.

Practical implications

The article advises corporate leaders to: assess their company's status against your growth ambitions and the 3C model winners follow; develop a point of view on the future and its opportunities; evolve your product market portfolio and initiatives; develop a competitive model; get to know your capabilities and align them with opportunities.

Originality/value

Contrary to conventional wisdom, firms with the will to be successful growers can break free of perceived constraints related to size, industry boundaries and geographic neighborhood.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Eric John Darling and Stephen Jonathan Whitty

The purpose of this paper is to describe the relationship between project work and stress. It examines how the conditions of project work negatively impact on an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the relationship between project work and stress. It examines how the conditions of project work negatively impact on an individual’s mental and physical state of well-being, consequentially reducing organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors systematically review the project management literature for sources of stress or stressors as it relates to Cooper and Marshall’s (1976) model of stress at work. The authors perform a thematic analysis on these stressors to reveal the “sub-stressor” conditions of project work.

Findings

A “model of projects as a source of stress at work” is developed. It shows the relationship between the sub-stressors of project work and the ill effects they have on mental and physical well-being of the project workforce.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study are constrained by the limits of a literature review process. This study has implications for research on stress in project work, as studies can benefit from the “model of projects as a source of stress at work”, which can be continually advanced to gain insights on the minimisation of physical and mental distress.

Practical implications

Many sectors including health, education, policing, aviation and military provide scenario-based training. In project management, a greater understanding of stressful scenarios and counter measures would improve health outcomes for project staff, human relations and project outcomes.

Originality/value

The study presents a comprehensive model of projects as a source of stress at work. It draws attention to the burden and cost of anxiety and stress placed on the project workforce. It makes the case for organisations and employees to take responsibility for the well-being of project staff.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Heather Höpfl

Addresses the notion of “phoria” in organizational change. Uses the deviceof the myth of the Erl König to explore the appropriation of emotion inorganizations and…

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1813

Abstract

Addresses the notion of “phoria” in organizational change. Uses the device of the myth of the Erl König to explore the appropriation of emotion in organizations and considers the role of rhetoric, liturgy and ritual in the preparation for changes. Argues that organizations trivialize the significance of change via a range of techniques which attempt to alleviate the experience of the burden of change. Argues for greater discernment between enlightenment and levity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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