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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Lynn Preston

This paper examines the accounts of three women, taken from the general population, who will not seek help for their alcohol problems. The narrative construction of their…

Abstract

This paper examines the accounts of three women, taken from the general population, who will not seek help for their alcohol problems. The narrative construction of their drinking forms a bricolage from the babble of discourses around alcohol that they encounter in their everyday lives. Much of the literature on alcohol & alcohol problems is written from the point of view of subjective experience mapped onto an objective definition which may show that they are not offering a true account of themselves, that they are in denial, or that they are displacing their (real) problem with alcohol onto something else. In this scenario, a cure can only be effected by first making the women understand, & then admit, what their real problem is. It is suggested that the reason these women, & possibly others, do not seek help is precisely because they fear that their own stories will be denied as untrue & that in this process, their own identities & personal accounts will be lost. In the confusion & difficulty they experience in defining the problem, they need an open space where they can explore their drinking & increase their knowledge from the many knowledges available, but free from the constraints & risks that they feel access to these knowledges would inevitably involve.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Jonathan Chick

The most burning controversy in the treatment of alcoholism is thatof abstinence or controlled drinking as the long‐term aim for patients.The article rehearses the…

Abstract

The most burning controversy in the treatment of alcoholism is that of abstinence or controlled drinking as the long‐term aim for patients. The article rehearses the arguments for both sides before discussing the efficacy of intensive treatment – research does not show residential treatment to be superior to day care. Behaviour therapy approaches have a more optimistic research literature than intensive treatments. Antabuse tablets can be considered as a last resort.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Nels Popp, Jonathan Jensen and Rhett Jackson

The purpose of this paper is to isolate factors predictive of event attendees, and assist tourism professionals such as members of host committees, in maximizing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to isolate factors predictive of event attendees, and assist tourism professionals such as members of host committees, in maximizing the number of out-of-town visitors to their region and optimizing tourism-related revenue when hosting college football bowl games.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 16 demand variables were entered into a hierarchical regression model, including the stature of the event and market-related variables, as well as team-related variables reflecting team or program stature and current season performance.

Findings

A final model containing seven variables (bowl age, market population, conference affiliation, bowl game stature, season wins, home attendance, and distance traveled) predicted 77.5 percent of the variance in bowl game attendance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper illustrates the use of predictive modeling for major sport event attendance with a unique sample and variables explored. Future research may build off the model to explore attendance for other populations or events.

Practical implications

The applied nature of this study allows practitioners working in the tourism and event management field to incorporate a predictive model to best select participants in sporting events to maximize event attendees.

Originality/value

Understanding the variables which predict event attendees in the context of college football bowl games provide useful data to practitioners. This study advances this area of research by treating event participants as unique observations (something which has not been done in prior studies), and looking at a new data set which incorporates the College Football Playoff era.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Book part
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Julia Christensen Hughes and Jonathan D. Christensen

Purpose: This chapter considers talent management in ‘situ’, at a time of unprecedented disruption, and identifies implications for practice and study.Methodology/approach

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter considers talent management in ‘situ’, at a time of unprecedented disruption, and identifies implications for practice and study.

Methodology/approach: We compare normative advice from the talent management literature with publicly available accounts of talent management strategies employed during the Covid-19 pandemic. We also include perceptions of employees from publicly available reviews (Glassdoor, 2020a), and a brief personal account.

Findings: Hospitality and tourism organisations are encountering unprecedented pressures for change, primarily due to Covid-19 as well as the sustainability and social justice movements. We identify three organisational responses to the pandemic – closing/contracting operations, consolidating around areas of strength, and creatively pivoting in new directions. Innovations in talent management were found to vary accordingly, including: humane downsizing and pay cuts; training and development (for managers and front-line employees, including in emotional intelligence, resilience, and delivering service excellence online); new talent acquisition, through new programmes, structures, roles, and partnerships; an enhanced employee value proposition, including safe and fun work environments, as well as improved pay and benefits; commitments to social equity and sustainability; courageous, creative, and resilient leadership; and effective communication. Despite these innovations, employee reviews suggest that top performing organisations continue to fall short on work–life balance, un-social working hours, inadequate compensation, and poor-quality managers.

Practical implications: Ever increasing business complexity requires skilled senior managers in multiple domains, and empowered, decentralised unit-level managerial and owner competence (with skills in emotional intelligence, collaboration, and negotiation). Front-line employees, capable of delivering excellence in customer service (despite disrupted circumstances), are more essential than ever. Successful enterprises, both now and in the future, will undoubtedly be those that prioritise talent, throughout all levels of organisation.

Research limitations/implications: Future research should undertake a more comprehensive investigation of talent management strategies employed (including from small business owners), as well as employee perceptions of their effectiveness (considering socio-economic differences as well as gender and race). Research is also needed with respect to the perceived value of organisational commitments to sustainability and social justice initiatives.

Originality/value: This chapter uniquely considers talent management at a time of crisis. Methodologically, it uses publicly available data of employee perceptions of their employers.

Details

Talent Management Innovations in the International Hospitality Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-307-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

This Food Standards Committee Report has been with us long enough to have received careful appraisal at the hand of the most interested parties — food law enforcement…

Abstract

This Food Standards Committee Report has been with us long enough to have received careful appraisal at the hand of the most interested parties — food law enforcement agencies and the meat trade. The purposes of the review was to consider the need for specific controls over the composition and descriptive labelling of minced meat products, but the main factor was the fat content, particularly the maximum suggested by the Associaton of Public Analysts, viz., a one‐quarter (25%) of the total product. For some years now, the courts have been asked to accept 25% fat as the maximum, based on a series of national surveys; above that level, the product was to be considered as not of the substance or quality demanded by the purchaser; a contention which has been upheld on appeal to the Divisional Court.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 85 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Necati Aydin

The purpose of this paper is to offer a new theory of human nature to explain the happiness paradox of capitalism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a new theory of human nature to explain the happiness paradox of capitalism.

Design/methodology/approach

It is argued that happiness crisis in capitalism stems from the lack of full understanding of human nature which is like a black box from which key assumptions in capitalist market system are derived. The author attempts to unlock this black box in order to understand the failure of capitalism in bringing happiness.

Findings

As the success of capitalism comes from its partial understanding of human nature, its failure comes from its partial misunderstanding or exploitation of human nature. This leads to ignoring the needs and desires of certain elements of human nature for the sake of serving only the animal spirit and self‐centric ego. The proposed new theory offers a new understanding of happiness and its determinants. Comparing the human body to a luxury recreational vehicle (RV) and the elements of human nature to the companions on this vehicle, the theory suggests that an individual cannot be truly happy if he or she listens only to one of his/her residents while disregarding the others. The new theory offers better explanation for the 2008 financial crisis and the happiness paradox in wealthy nations. It also provides an underlining framework for the existing happiness theories.

Research limitations/implications

The new theory needs to be tested through empirical studies.

Social implications

The paper theoretically argues that that authentic happiness is possible if individuals listen to the voices of all elements of human nature and try to fulfil their needs and desires in a balanced manner.

Originality/value

The paper offers a new comprehensive theory on human nature.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2019

James Fowler

Abstract

Details

London Transport: A Hybrid in History 1905–1948
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-953-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1925

The staffing of the county libraries proceeds apace and all kinds of appointments are reported. It is rumoured that a retired army man has been selected in one case and a…

Abstract

The staffing of the county libraries proceeds apace and all kinds of appointments are reported. It is rumoured that a retired army man has been selected in one case and a school teacher in another, both of whom, without special library experience, will be entrusted with the organisation of their respective library schemes. It is further reported that a discussion among Directors of Education brought forth the opinion that trained men were not necessary on these jobs, “men of commonsense” being preferred.

Details

New Library World, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Stephen Brown

To show how consumer researchers can learn from novels and analogous works of fiction.

Abstract

Purpose

To show how consumer researchers can learn from novels and analogous works of fiction.

Design/methodology/approach

Close reading of two recent novels, The Savage Girl by Alex Shakar and Jennifer Government by Max Barry.

Findings

The paper shows how works of fiction can be used as a intellectual resource by the consumer research community. It argues that fiction refreshed the parts that other research methods cannot reach.

Research limitations/implications

Much depends on the caliber of the novels. Not every work of art is a work of genius. The article contends that consumer researchers need to move beyond singing the praises of fiction and, in pursuit of new paths to thick description, seek instead to novelise our findings. Or narrate them better at least.

Practical implications

Marketing practitioners might learn more from reading novels than the academic marketing literature.

Originality/value

There is nothing particularly original in the paper. It reiterates what several scholars have said already. The message is sufficiently important to warrant constant repetition, however.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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