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1 – 10 of 17
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Jane M. Binner, Thomas Elger, Birger Nilsson and Jonathan A. Tepper

The purpose of this study is to contrast the forecasting performance of two non-linear models, a regime-switching vector autoregressive model (RS-VAR) and a recurrent…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to contrast the forecasting performance of two non-linear models, a regime-switching vector autoregressive model (RS-VAR) and a recurrent neural network (RNN), to that of a linear benchmark VAR model. Our specific forecasting experiment is U.K. inflation and we utilize monthly data from 1969 to 2003. The RS-VAR and the RNN perform approximately on par over both monthly and annual forecast horizons. Both non-linear models perform significantly better than the VAR model.

Details

Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Finance and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-303-7

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Abstract

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Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Finance and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-303-7

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Abstract

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Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Finance and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-303-7

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2022

Abbie Salcedo, Peter Williams, Simone Elias, Maxine Valencia and Jonathan Perez

Marginalization exists in many organizations, despite a zero-tolerance stance on discrimination, abuse and harassment. Human resource development (HRD) professionals are…

Abstract

Purpose

Marginalization exists in many organizations, despite a zero-tolerance stance on discrimination, abuse and harassment. Human resource development (HRD) professionals are increasingly asked to respond to the calls for crucial conversations on race and diversity. However, traditional HRD methods and tools may not be sufficient to address and eradicate racism in the workplace. The usage of testimonio could enable oppressed groups to communicate their narratives to counter stereotypes. This paper aims to describe testimonio and the various ways it can be used as a research methodology and to perturb the dominant practices in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper uses testimonio, a narrative methodology with Latin American roots in indigenous oral storytelling, to expand beyond Eurocentric qualitative approaches to capture the voices of marginalized groups. This study gives examples and theorizes how leaders, including human resource professionals, may use this approach to give voice to underrepresented stakeholders in the margins of organizations. Testimonio serves as a non-Eurocentric framework and venue to legitimize their stories. Their voices are assets, enriching while transforming and perturbing and so are needed for communities and organizations to foster a just and sustainable culture and climate.

Findings

The use of testimonio as an HRD approach to amplify unrepresented voices in the workplace may be an asset to HRD professionals. However, to realize the full potential of this research tradition in HRD, researchers and practitioners must create more space where trust is present for these groups to tell stories that matter most to them.

Research limitations/implications

This study on the testimonio approach provides a view into organizational power dynamics and voices from the margins. It serves as a means to acknowledge the voices of underrepresented stakeholders in the workplace. HRD scholars should contribute to organizational effectiveness and inclusive workplace climate by using scholarship to highlight the harm of marginalizing policies and behaviors.

Practical implications

Testimonio implies that HRD practitioners in positions of privilege should use their authority to foreground the voices of marginalized individuals who are typically silenced. This can be accomplished by prioritizing unheard voices in the work of HRD professionals. Testimonio as a methodological approach and workplace tool highlights the personal experiences of oppressed groups who experience social injustice, particularly racism. This method encourages organizations that do not operate in a culturally sensitive and inclusive environment to reconsider the discourse that influences their social position.

Originality/value

While there is a clear need to address inequities, few practical inquiry tools are presented. Moreover, through their epistemologies and research procedures, scholars and practitioners may unintentionally maintain and reinforce existing inequitable structures and processes. This paper presents testimonio as a non-Western alternative to Eurocentric qualitative research methodologies to perturb dominant practices in HRD.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Shafaq Aftab, Irfan Saleem and Rakesh Belwal

This study aims to invoke social comparison theory and researches mainly on leaders’ downward envy at workplaces in a collectivist culture. The study also aims to infer…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to invoke social comparison theory and researches mainly on leaders’ downward envy at workplaces in a collectivist culture. The study also aims to infer and explain the constructive and destructive behaviour of benign envy (BE) and malicious envy (ME) in the workplace by studying supervisor-subordinate dyads.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to test the proposed hypotheses. The sample included 352 randomly chosen supervisor-subordinate dyads from registered software houses in Pakistan. Partial least square SEM was used to test the proposed model and hypotheses.

Findings

This research identified that the leaders' gratitude and workplace friendship encourage leaders to adopt a levelling-up strategy to encounter benign envy (BE). In contrast, subordinates’ low level of loyalty and affect towards supervisors cause ME. The study also found that BE motivates frustrated supervisors to behave positively, whereas ME triggers the envious supervisor to threaten their aides with abusive supervision. However, envious supervisors with high core self-evaluation and gratitude are more likely to reflect self-improvement.

Practical implications

This study gives key insights to organisations on recognising the potential of downward envy, using it purposefully, and managing the consequences constructively. For instance, organizations could train leaders to understand the holistic view of downward envy to help them focus on self-improvement instead of abusing employees. In addition, training employees on envy could help them demonstrate warmth and competence.

Originality/value

The study is original and valuable in three aspects. Theoretically, this study develops a generic framework for dealing with downward envy. Contextually, the study brings a piece of evidence from software houses in Asia to study downward envy. Practically, this study suggests tactics to deal with downward envy in family-owned tech firms operating in emerging markets.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Randal S. Franz and Henry L. Petersen

The purpose of this paper is to explain people's divergent perceptions of companies' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities in order to help organizations…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain people's divergent perceptions of companies' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities in order to help organizations strategically manage their global responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Combining institutional theory and role‐theory, the authors examine how people's expectations for the role of business (RoB) in society define the standard by which corporate activities are judged. Where conformity to institutional models confers “legitimacy” and compliance to social scripts constitutes “appropriate” behavior, the authors contend that congruence with RoB expectations is what defines corporate responsibility. This research utilized a quasi‐experimental method to explore the effects of stakeholder status and individuals' RoB expectations on their assessments of CSR activities.

Findings

Significant differences were found between stakeholder groups on all but one of the CSR activities scales. Of substantially more impact, subjects' RoB expectations were found to significantly shape their assessment on all CSR activities scales. A factor analysis of the RoB items identified five dimensions to the role business plays in society, which together define a holistic model for global responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

Subjects were recruited by convenience and randomly assigned to the four experimental conditions, so they are not representative of the general population. Future research would benefit from cross‐cultural, longitudinal and qualitative explorations into people's RoB expectations.

Practical implications

The five RoB components provide managers with a tool to strategically manage a multi‐dimensional portfolio of corporate CSR activities.

Originality/value

This research applies role‐theory concepts to the study of CSR, thereby introducing some emergent, situational, negotiated and idiosyncratic dynamics to our understanding of global responsibility.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Abstract

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Vaughn Schmutz, Sarah H. Pollock and Jordan S. Bendickson

Previous research suggests that women receive less critical attention and acclaim in popular music. The authors expect that gender differences in the amount and content of…

Abstract

Previous research suggests that women receive less critical attention and acclaim in popular music. The authors expect that gender differences in the amount and content of media discourse about popular musicians occur because music critics draw on the cultural frame of gender as a primary tool for critical evaluation. In order to explore the role of gender as a frame through which aesthetic content is evaluated, the authors conduct detailed content analyses of 53 critical reviews of two versions of the popular album 1989 – the original released by Taylor Swift in 2014 and a cover version released by Ryan Adams less than a year later. Despite Swift’s greater popularity and prominence, the authors find that reviews of her version of the album are more likely to focus on her gender and sexuality; less likely to describe her as emotionally authentic; and more likely to use popular aesthetic criteria in evaluating her music. By contrast, Ryan Adams was more likely to be seen by critics as emotionally authentic and to be described using high art aesthetic criteria and intellectualizing discourse. The authors address the implications of the findings for persistent gender gaps in many artistic fields.

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Gender and the Media: Women’s Places
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-329-4

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Abstract

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The Learning Organization, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Elena Millan and Jonathan Reynolds

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of individualism and collectivism at an individual level, in the context of an emergent market economy of Eastern…

3703

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of individualism and collectivism at an individual level, in the context of an emergent market economy of Eastern Europe. More specifically, the effects of the psychological constructs of independent/interdependent self on a number of clothing‐related consumer behaviour phenomena are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a home‐based face‐to‐face survey of some 1,000 Bulgarian respondents.

Findings

Evidence was found supporting the notion that the relationship between individualism and collectivism is complex, and individualist and collectivist values do not characterise two opposing cultural dimensions. Additionally, being autonomous or being interrelated with important, others were found to play an important part in consumer preference for self‐ and social‐symbolic meanings of clothing artefacts, as well as on shopping attitudes held and actual purchase behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions and implications of the research are limited to the factors considered in the conceptual model. The use of face‐to‐face interviews can lead to the interviewer's intentional or unintentional influencing of the survey results. The use of self‐reporting measures in the structured interview can result in acquiescence.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that marketers and retailers will benefit from individualising their activities.

Originality/value

The paper develops further our understanding of the effects of the independent/interdependent self‐concept on diverse consumption phenomena and provides empirical evidence in support of the proposed conceptual model using a nationally representative sample.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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