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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2014

Daryl Koehn

In order to consider fiction’s contribution to understanding organizations and their ethics, we need to examine the connection between creativity and morality. This…

Abstract

In order to consider fiction’s contribution to understanding organizations and their ethics, we need to examine the connection between creativity and morality. This chapter explores six possible relations, drawing upon a variety of works (creations) from a poet, a playwright, and several philosophers. I argue that any relationship between fiction/creativity and morality is multi-dimensional and should be treated as such in future research in business ethics and organizational studies. In particular, we are not entitled simply to assume that fictive creativity will bolster existing norms or engender virtues. On the contrary, in some cases, fiction reveals just how difficult it is to apply norms or to identify the virtuous course of action, given that we often do not have an accurate understanding of what is going on in an organizational or business setting, much less a cogent grasp on whether the behavior is right and good.

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The Contribution of Fiction to Organizational Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-949-2

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Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Cheryl J. Craig

In this chapter, the professional knowledge landscape of schools is explored for its shaping effect on the life satisfaction and morale of teachers. Knowledge communities…

Abstract

In this chapter, the professional knowledge landscape of schools is explored for its shaping effect on the life satisfaction and morale of teachers. Knowledge communities, those associations and relationships that teachers experience as they navigate life in schools, is the conceptual lens that is used. Two teacher stories are explored. Both narratives reveal emotional and relationship influences on teachers as they find, build and work in knowledge communities. Knowledge community interactions, in turn, help them to understand the issues of their school community and support their survival on the larger professional landscape. This chapter uses narrative inquiry to analyse the stories that the teachers in the two exemplars (one Canadian; one American) lived and relived, told and re-told. Finally, serial interpretation allows for the unearthing of encompassing ideas which cut across both narratives and make visible common themes worthy of research attention.

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Emotion and School: Understanding how the Hidden Curriculum Influences Relationships, Leadership, Teaching, and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-651-4

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Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2000

Mary K. Zimmerman

Gender bias in medical knowledge and practice is an issue of longstanding significance for women's health scholars and activists alike. This paper assesses the current…

Abstract

Gender bias in medical knowledge and practice is an issue of longstanding significance for women's health scholars and activists alike. This paper assesses the current status of medical education, where gender bias has the potential to influence the culture and process of medical care, and focuses on three areas of concern: the presence and participation of women as medical students and faculty, the problem of gender bias in the content of medical curricula and training programs, and the friendliness for both men and women of the climate and environment of medical education. Significant change has occurred over the past several decades in the admission of women into medicine; yet, women remain under represented in positions of leadership and decision authority. In the 1990s, the content of the medical curriculum began to be evaluated in terms of gender, and a number of the resulting changes were implemented. Additionally, recent attention has been placed on improving the gender friendliness of medical school policies and resources. While these developments signal a decrease in gender bias and greater equality in medical education, the ability of the medical profession to continue to address these issues is being challenged by the increasingly powerful private health care economy.

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Health Care Providers, Institutions, and Patients: Changing Patterns of Care Provision and Care Delivery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-644-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Michalinos Zembylas

The paper seeks to examine the potential implications for leadership preparation programs of the intersection between emotions and leadership for social justice.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine the potential implications for leadership preparation programs of the intersection between emotions and leadership for social justice.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology followed was grounded in an ethnographic case study of a Greek‐Cypriot principal who struggled to transform his elementary school into a community that truly included students from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

Findings

The findings of the case study highlight: the vision and practices of leadership for social justice; the ambivalent emotions of social justice leadership; and strategies for coping with the personal and structural dimensions of social justice leadership.

Practical implications

The practical implications are discussed in relation to the emotional knowledge and skills that are needed for preparing social justice leaders to navigate emotionally through existing school structures and to cultivate critical emotional reflexivity about the changes that are needed to school discourses and practices so that justice and equity are placed at the center of school leadership.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into the emotional aspects of leadership for social justice, focusing on the implications for leadership preparation programs.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Russell Jaffe, Robert A. Nash, Richard Ash, Norman Schwartz, Robert Corish, Tammy Born, Harold Lazarus and ASIMP Working Group on Healthcare Transparency

Healthcare is an ever‐growing segment of the American economy. Transparency facilitates better decision‐making and better outcomes measures. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is an ever‐growing segment of the American economy. Transparency facilitates better decision‐making and better outcomes measures. The purpose of this paper is to present the human and economic results of increasing transparency.

Design/methodology/approach

The ASIMP Working Group on Healthcare Transparency represents a diverse yet conscilient group of practitioners, researchers, regulators, economists, and academics. Given the need for re‐envisioning healthcare to include more accountability, evidence of efficacy and transparency, this integrative medicine (ASIMP) working group is suitable to address the above purpose.

Findings

Substantial opportunity exists to reduce morbidity and mortality, suffering and excess death, unnecessary costs and risks. Greater transparency facilitates the transition to safer, more effective, more humane healthcare.

Research limitations/implications

This paper starts from a need to improve clinical outcomes and value for resources devoted. Best efforts of a national working group are presented. The implications of the report, when tested, will determine the enduring value of this work.

Practical implications

Consumers and business, administrators and practitioners can improve care at lower cost by increasing transparency. This will accelerate the diffusion of effective approaches that are not yet in widespread use despite replication of efficacy.

Originality/value

This is the first time an integrative approach has been compared with conventional healthcare models, particularly with regard to the role of transparency in healthcare management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Laszlo Zsolnai

Business activities considerably affect the fate and survival of natural ecosystems as well as the life conditions of present and future generations. Applying the…

Abstract

Business activities considerably affect the fate and survival of natural ecosystems as well as the life conditions of present and future generations. Applying the imperative of responsibility developed by Jonas states that business has a one way, non‐reciprocal duty caring for the beings which are affected by its functioning. To meet its global responsibilities business should become sustainable, pro‐social and future‐enhancing.

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Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Geoffrey C. Williams, Kathryn M. Markakis, Deborah Ossip‐Klein, Scott McIntosh, Scott Tripler and Tana Grady‐Weliky

To provide a rationale regarding the importance of physician behavior change counseling. To describe the double helix behavior change curriculum at the University of…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a rationale regarding the importance of physician behavior change counseling. To describe the double helix behavior change curriculum at the University of Rochester (UR). To provide initial evidence that the curriculum is effective.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence that physician use of the 5A's model is effective in changing important patient health behaviors is summarized. The behavior change curriculum is described. Initial evidence assessing knowledge, attitudes and skills for behavior change counseling is reviewed.

Findings

Physicians will be better prepared to intervene to improve their patients quality and quantity of life if they consistently counsel patients using a brief standard model (the 5A's) that integrates biological, psychological, and social aspects of disease and treatment. Past efforts in the UR's curriculum have demonstrated that students adopt broader “biopsychosocial values” when the curriculum supports their learning needs. Initial evidence demonstrates that double helix curriculum students learn this model well and are able to provide the counseling in a patient‐centered style.

Research limitations/implications

These results are limited by the observational design, and the reliance on student self‐reports and standardized patient observations of student behavior rather than change in patient behavior.

Practical implications

Strong evidence exists that physicians can be effective in providing behavior change counseling. Additional research is called for to create, implement, and fully evaluate behavior change counseling curricula for medical students.

Originality/value

An example of a behavior change curriculum is provided for medical educators, and initial evidence of its effectiveness is provided.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Christian Harpelund

Abstract

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Onboarding: Getting New Hires off to a Flying Start
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-582-5

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Vilma Zydziunaite, Daiva Lepaite, Päivi Åstedt-Kurki and Tarja Suominen

– The purpose of this paper is to characterize issues related to head nurses’ decision making when managing ethical dilemmas.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to characterize issues related to head nurses’ decision making when managing ethical dilemmas.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative descriptive, in which researchers stay close to the data. The data were collected in the format of unstructured written reflections. Inductive conventional latent qualitative content analysis was applied to the data.

Findings

The issues of head nurses’ management of decision making in ethical dilemmas relate to the following aspects: taking risks in deviating from the formalities, balancing power and humaneness, maintaining the professional hierarchy, managing resistance to change, managing with limited options, and experiencing the decline of nurse’s professional and/or human dignity.

Research limitations/implications

Reflections in written form were preferred to semi-structured interviews and the researchers were unable to contact the participants directly and to ask additional questions. All the reflections were produced in a language other than English.

Practical implications

The issues of head nurses’ management of decision making in ethical dilemmas reveal the gap between societal expectations and the opportunities to improve nursing leadership in health care organizations.

Social implications

The issues of head nurses’ decision making when managing ethical dilemmas are related to contexts that reflect the attitudes of society and health care system toward nursing management.

Originality/value

The study adds to the understanding of issues of the management of decision making in ethical dilemmas. It is an ongoing systematic process that encourages head nurses to learn from practice and manage the quality of care by empowering themselves and nurses to take responsibility for leadership.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Richard A. Gray

Plato and Aristotle would have found the modern effort to fuse ethics and ecology to be incomprehensible. Despite the fact that oikos—meaning house or household—is a Greek…

Abstract

Plato and Aristotle would have found the modern effort to fuse ethics and ecology to be incomprehensible. Despite the fact that oikos—meaning house or household—is a Greek word, Greek science did not entertain a concept of ecology. Nor did Greek philosophy regard nature as morally considerable. Etymology aside, the word ecology in anything like its modern sense of “biospheric house” did not appear in European thought until 1873 when Ernst Heinrich Haeckel, a German biologist and philosopher, used it, with the spelling “Oekologie,” in his The History of Creation. Furthermore, the words “ecology” and “ecological” always had exclusive reference, until quite recently, to a scientific discipline and not to a branch of philosophy. As with the Classical Greek philosophers, so it was also with modern thinkers. Ethics, they held, were concerned solely with interpersonal relations. They could not, therefore, recognize a duty to nature. That we do owe a duty to nature, however, is the carefully considered conclusion of most of the environmental ethicists.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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