Search results

1 – 3 of 3
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Jonas Ekow Yankah, Divine Tuinese Novieto, Emmanuel Davies and Kofi Owusu Adjei

This study was conducted to identify, summarise, analyse and categorise mobile device applications (Apps), relevant to the construction industry and to explore their uses and…

1309

Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted to identify, summarise, analyse and categorise mobile device applications (Apps), relevant to the construction industry and to explore their uses and exposure levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method involved reviewing literature and searching for Apps. The construction Apps were found by developing key phrases. These key phrases were used to develop search strategies, which were then used to find the construction Apps. The Apps found were categorised based on the similarity of their uses.

Findings

The 136 Apps identified were summarised, analysed, and categorised into 11 groups of distinct construction operations and tasks. The “Design and Drawing Apps”, “Measurement and Estimation Apps”, “Management Apps”, “All Round Apps” and “Construction Site Apps” recorded 29, 28, 26, 21 and 11 numbers of Apps, respectively. The Autodesk Sketchbook, GPS Field Area Measure, MagicPlan, Measure and TSheets were the top five in terms of the number of downloads. These Apps in terms of their exposure levels in the construction industry record 4.76%, 2.38%, 0.52%, 0.48% and 0.42%, respectively.

Originality/value

This paper provides a catalogue of the continuum of construction Apps for a wide variety of construction operations/activities which are available for construction professionals and provide guidance on their uses to assist in selecting appropriate Apps for specified operation/tasks/activities in the construction industry. Construction professionals may benefit from increased productivity, efficiency and ease of working.

Details

Frontiers in Engineering and Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-2499

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2024

Jonas Ekow Yankah, Kofi Owusu Adjei and Chris Kurbom Tieru

Robotics and automation are successful in construction, health and safety, but costs and expertise hinder their use in developing nations. This study examined mobile apps as a…

Abstract

Purpose

Robotics and automation are successful in construction, health and safety, but costs and expertise hinder their use in developing nations. This study examined mobile apps as a more accessible and affordable alternative.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study explored the use of mobile apps in construction, health and safety management. It used a literature review to identify their availability, accessibility, and capabilities. The study consisted of four five stages: searching for relevant apps, selecting them based on versatility, examining their specific functions, removing untested apps and discussing their functions based on empirical studies.

Findings

A comprehensive literature review identified 35 mobile apps that are relevant to health and safety management during construction. After rigorous analysis, eight apps were selected for further study based on their relevance, user friendliness and compliance with safety standards. These apps collectively serve 28 distinct functions, including first-aid training and administration, safety compliance and danger awareness, safety education and training, hazard detection and warnings.

Practical implications

This study suggests that mobile apps can provide a cost-effective and readily accessible alternative to robotics and automation in health and safety management in construction. Further research is needed to accurately assess the efficacy of these apps in real-world conditions.

Originality/value

This study explored the use of apps in health and safety management, highlighting their diverse capabilities and providing a framework for project managers, contractors and safety officers to select suitable apps.

Details

Frontiers in Engineering and Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-2499

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2023

George Harrison Coffie, Divine Tuinese Novieto and Jonas Ekow Yankah

This study aims to investigate stakeholders' perception of the most prevalent unethical practices in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate stakeholders' perception of the most prevalent unethical practices in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Data used for this study came from a cross-sectional survey (questionnaire), which was administered to 273 stakeholders in the construction industry using convenience sampling technique. The data were analyzed using statistical software package SPSSv17 to determine the most prevalent unethical practices. The ranking factor was calculated based on relative importance index (RII) value.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that corruption was perceived by major stakeholders as the most prevalent unethical behavior (RII = 0.82) followed by bribery (RII = 0.79). Political interference and kickback came third (RII = 0.77) and fourth (RII = 0.74), respectively. However, the least prevalent unethical behaviors were extortion (RII = 0.56), workplace violence (RII = 0.57), alcohol abuse (RII = 0.59) and harassment (RII = 0.59). The findings suggest that when the various groupings were taken into consideration separately, the differences in their perceptions were obvious.

Research limitations/implications

Data for this study were collected from construction stakeholders in Ghana who were conveniently sampled. As a result, in reference to the sampling framework which focused on major stakeholders in only two regions of Ghana does not sufficiently ensure full generalization of the results.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide significant information for construction organizations and practitioners regarding unethical practices, which are most prevalent in the Ghanaian construction industry. Construction organizations and practitioners seeking to mitigate the negative effect of unethical practices on their performance should focus on educating construction workers on how to avoid corrupt practices and report same to the authorities. Also, ethics training programs must be instituted for staff coupled with constant and random inspection and checking of ethical compliance, verbal promotion and praise for ethical conduct and in some cases increase in employees pay.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to have accessed the views of broader stakeholders, i.e. consultants, contractors, professionals, suppliers, regulators, clients and construction workers in the construction industry regarding the most prevalent unethical practices in the Ghanaian construction industry in one study. This study, therefore, enriches the current literature by providing additional dimension to the understanding of unethical practices in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3