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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Jon Younger

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Charlotte Reid and Jon Young

Focuses on the needs of recent immigrant children in Canadiancities. Outlines the problems teachers face in the assessment, placementin classes and teaching of recent…

Abstract

Focuses on the needs of recent immigrant children in Canadian cities. Outlines the problems teachers face in the assessment, placement in classes and teaching of recent immigrant children in a Winnipeg area elementary school. Suggests that there should be specific policies relating to the education of these children taking into account the sociological realities of school life. The policies should provide a context and the resources to support school and classroom practices that enable teachers to define and operationalize sound educational experiences for immigrant children.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Jon Younger, René Sorensen, Christine Cleemann, Aaron Younger, Allan Freed and Sanne Moller

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a leading global company used action‐learning based leadership development to accelerate strategic culture change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a leading global company used action‐learning based leadership development to accelerate strategic culture change.

Design/methodology/approach

It describes the need for change, and the methodology and approach by which the initiative, Impact, generated significant benefits.

Findings

The initiative led to financial benefit, as well as measurable gains in customer centricity, collaboration, and innovation. It was also a powerful experience for participants in their journey as commercial leaders.

Originality/value

Impact was created using comprehensive customer feedback and its delivery involved key customers.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Jon Hampson and Richard Lamming

Purchasing has enjoyed a change of image in recent times. Once regarded as a peripheral, cost‐obsessed activity, it is now widely recognized as a potentially vital…

Abstract

Purchasing has enjoyed a change of image in recent times. Once regarded as a peripheral, cost‐obsessed activity, it is now widely recognized as a potentially vital strategic discipline. Yet the ways in which many efficiency and financially‐based measures are employed reflect the outdated idea that purchasing is an add‐on cost to a business. A new approach to measurement is required that supports and reflects purchasing's value‐adding contribution.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Jon Younger, Aaron Younger and Nate Thompson

The aim of this paper is to explore the importance and development of HR consulting and change management skills.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the importance and development of HR consulting and change management skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the results of a study of HR consulting and change management skills, and the practical application of consulting and change management skills through professional education combined with action learning in a major global corporation.

Findings

The HR professionals in the study, drawn from a wide range of organizations, industries and geographies, tend to have a much higher level of confidence in their consulting and change management skills than the line managers who participated in this research.

Originality/value

In addition to pointing out specific areas where consulting and change management skills need to be improved, the paper demonstrates the value of increased skills through a case example of the impact of improving HR professional consulting and change skills in a top European‐based and global energy company. Following the review of this initiative and its impact, the paper identifies specific practical steps and methods for increasing HR consulting and change management effectiveness.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Dave Ulrich, Justin Allen, Norm Smallwood, Wayne Brockbank and Jon Younger

Traditional views of organizational culture have one thing in common; they define culture from the inside out – who we are, what we do and how we do it. In this article…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional views of organizational culture have one thing in common; they define culture from the inside out – who we are, what we do and how we do it. In this article, the authors suggest that a more robust and practical approach to leveraging culture is to identify and shape culture from the outside in.

Design/methodology/approach

They define culture as “what we want to be known for by our best customers made real to our employees through systemic processes every day.” With a practical process, the article outlines four straightforward steps to create culture from the outside in. They are: clarify a compelling strategy to identify target customers; create a unity of identity; make that identity real for customers; and make that identity real for employees.

Findings

The paper reiterates that a more robust and impactful approach to leveraging culture is by defining and shaping it from the outside in. When leaders follow the four steps outlined above, they will define the right, customer‐centric culture. In a volatile world of speed and change, customers must be the foundation of organizational culture.

Originality/value

The authors conclude that in a volatile world of speed and change, organizations build winning cultures when their culture efforts begin with customers, then shift to employee behaviors and organizational processes.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Jon Younger

HR leaders face a range of challenges on assuming responsibility for the function in their organizations. This paper aims to argue that if managed well, the actions of HR…

Abstract

Purpose

HR leaders face a range of challenges on assuming responsibility for the function in their organizations. This paper aims to argue that if managed well, the actions of HR leaders over the first 90 days offer a significant opportunity to put the fundamentals for success in place; in turn, badly managed transitions can hurt the leader's effectiveness at building key relationships, defining the strategic agenda, assessing needs for improvement and developing the plan for creating value for the business.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the authors' experience with dozens of new heads of HR. It synthesizes this work to offer a practical framework for action and specific tips on how HR leaders can make the most of the first 90 days.

Findings

It is shown that as a new leader, one has a unique opportunity to shape a new agenda for the HR department.

Originality/value

The paper is written as if the authors are coaching the reader through this transition by asking the right questions that increase the chance of success.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Dave Ulrich, Jon Younger, Wayne Brockbank and Mike Ulrich

This article aims to describe partial results of the 2012 Global Human Resources Competency Study (HRCS), led by the RBL Group and the Ross School of Business, University…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to describe partial results of the 2012 Global Human Resources Competency Study (HRCS), led by the RBL Group and the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the past 25 years, this ongoing research project has provided the most global, comprehensive, and empirical identification of the competencies expected of HR professionals, and the impact of these competencies on both individual HR professional effectiveness and business performance.

Findings

This article points out a number of the key findings of the research – including the six fundamental competency domains that HR professionals must demonstrate to impact business performance – and identifies implications of the study findings for HR talent planning, assessment and development.

Originality/value

HRCS findings have influenced thousands of HR departments, from global giants to smaller organizations in every continent.

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

It has been a while since the question “What's a Human Resource Department for?” could have been dismissed with a brief, yet comprehensive, answer along the lines of: “Well, it's mainly concerned with administrative stuff – you know, payroll, paperwork, sorting out training courses, keeping a track of holidays and days off. That sort of thing.” Things have moved on apace since then – so what of the future?

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

This Food Standards Committee Report has been with us long enough to have received careful appraisal at the hand of the most interested parties — food law enforcement…

Abstract

This Food Standards Committee Report has been with us long enough to have received careful appraisal at the hand of the most interested parties — food law enforcement agencies and the meat trade. The purposes of the review was to consider the need for specific controls over the composition and descriptive labelling of minced meat products, but the main factor was the fat content, particularly the maximum suggested by the Associaton of Public Analysts, viz., a one‐quarter (25%) of the total product. For some years now, the courts have been asked to accept 25% fat as the maximum, based on a series of national surveys; above that level, the product was to be considered as not of the substance or quality demanded by the purchaser; a contention which has been upheld on appeal to the Divisional Court.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 85 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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