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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Timothy C. Weiskel

This article reviews areas of common concern between librarians on the one hand and scholars on the other as they each attempt to pursue their work in an era of electronic…

Abstract

This article reviews areas of common concern between librarians on the one hand and scholars on the other as they each attempt to pursue their work in an era of electronic information. The issues require the attention of both librarians and scholars, and it is argued that both communities need now to talk more extensively with one another in an effort to re‐think the fundamental role of the university library in the coming years. The function and importance of Integrated Scholarly Information Systems (ISIS) are discussed with examples to illustrate the ways in which scholars are likely to acquire and integrate electronic information in the future. The article concludes with reflections on two contradictory trends that are emerging in scholarly research with the expansion of electronic research systems.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Jon Drabenstott

Today's online catalogs typically access machine‐readable records for books, journal titles, and audio‐visual materials, and indicate their circulation status. In the…

Abstract

Today's online catalogs typically access machine‐readable records for books, journal titles, and audio‐visual materials, and indicate their circulation status. In the future, the database of these traditional records may be dwarfed by additional databases that will become part of the future electronic library. A few libraries are already experimenting with the addition of other text files to their catalogs. Broad‐band telecommunications networks and supporting technologies are being developed rapidly and will significantly affect the evolution of online catalogs. Growing applications of online catalogs, and network access to them, will require more sophisticated and powerful processing. Six prominent consultants—Joseph Becker, Gayla Kraetsch Hartsough, Raymond DeBuse, Jose‐Marie Griffiths, Rick Richmond, and Wilson Stahl—address these and related issues.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Jon Drabenstott, Marvin E. Pollard, Sara C. Heitshu, John Webb and Michael Madden

These studies provide a cross‐section of current library automation activity. They illustrate some of the forces acting on libraries, the growth and development of the…

Abstract

These studies provide a cross‐section of current library automation activity. They illustrate some of the forces acting on libraries, the growth and development of the library marketplace, and the increasing complexity and interrelationships of automated systems. Above all, they lead to an appreciation of just how daunting automation projects can be, and how profoundly these new systems are changing libraries. These contributors have administered projects in which many successes have been realized in often difficult, but not atypical, circumstances.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Jon Drabenstott, Wilson M. Stahl, James J. Michael, Rick Richmond, Gene Robinson and James E. Rush

Typically, library building projects are undertaken to accommodate a library's needs for the foreseeable twenty years or more. With major changes in information…

Abstract

Typically, library building projects are undertaken to accommodate a library's needs for the foreseeable twenty years or more. With major changes in information technologies occurring at intervals of less than five years, it should be assumed, within its twenty‐plus years of initial service, that a library building will have to accommodate a series of changes in order to support currently unknown technologies. Issues related to the development of library facilities that will meet current and future needs are discussed by three prominent consultants and representatives of two vendors: Wilson M. Stahl, James J. Michael (Data Research Associates), Rick Richmond, Gene Robinson (CLSI), and James E. Rush.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Jon Drabenstott

Automation represents one of the greatest changes a library can undergo. An automation plan must not only produce an optimum system, but prepare the staff, institution and…

Abstract

Automation represents one of the greatest changes a library can undergo. An automation plan must not only produce an optimum system, but prepare the staff, institution and clientele for far‐reaching change. This change can be accommodated by a functional model consisting of three phases: 1) organization and overview, 2) project expansion, and 3) project consolidation and preparationof the system plan. An educational program is the centerpiece of the process.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Jon Drabenstott

Five prominent consultants‐Richard Boss, Susan Baerg Epstein, Rob McGee, Joseph Matthews, and James E. Rush—discuss the three most common mistakes made by librarians…

Abstract

Five prominent consultants‐Richard Boss, Susan Baerg Epstein, Rob McGee, Joseph Matthews, and James E. Rush—discuss the three most common mistakes made by librarians involved in automation. These mistakes are costly in terms of time, money, and functional success. They are made repeatedly; all are avoidable.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Jon Drabenstott

Five prominent consultants look into the future, projecting technological advancements that, in some cases, will enhance current library systems, and in many cases will…

Abstract

Five prominent consultants look into the future, projecting technological advancements that, in some cases, will enhance current library systems, and in many cases will cause them to become obsolete. Major trends include advances in mainframe and microcomputing technology, the development of inexpensive local area networks and telecommunications gateways, and the advent of (mass) optical storage.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Jon Drabenstott

Five prominent consultants‐Richard Boss, Susan Baerg Epstein, Rob McGee, Joseph Matthews, and James E. Rush—discuss the most common mistakes vendors make in implementing…

Abstract

Five prominent consultants‐Richard Boss, Susan Baerg Epstein, Rob McGee, Joseph Matthews, and James E. Rush—discuss the most common mistakes vendors make in implementing automated systems. Basic problems relate to identification of library needs; communications; delivery dates; inadequate systems; and systems support. Suggestions are made for correcting these problems.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Jon Drabenstott

A successful automation project combines a sound financial plan with convincing arguments, thoughtful strategies, and sensitive treatment of potential supporters. A…

Abstract

A successful automation project combines a sound financial plan with convincing arguments, thoughtful strategies, and sensitive treatment of potential supporters. A proposal that details costs and returns is as essential to raising funds as a well‐ conceived technical plan. Sources of financial support include governing bodies, foundations, granting agencies, businesses, and individuals. Creative alternatives for financing library automation are mentioned.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Jon Drabenstott

Five consultants address the challenge of projecting automation costs. The various cost‐components of automation are identified, as are the factors that contribute most to…

Abstract

Five consultants address the challenge of projecting automation costs. The various cost‐components of automation are identified, as are the factors that contribute most to cost miscalculation. Rules‐of‐thumb for projecting costs, and the risk associated with their use, are reviewed. The importance of life‐cycle planning is stressed.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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