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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Jon Christensen and Amit Bandyopadhyay

A novel approach is used to reverse engineer polymeric parts in a low cost, non‐destructive manner. Solids created from polymers with an index of refraction matching that…

1064

Abstract

A novel approach is used to reverse engineer polymeric parts in a low cost, non‐destructive manner. Solids created from polymers with an index of refraction matching that of an immersion liquid are reverse engineered using a CCD camera. Serial images are taken as the part is immersed into the liquid or taken out of the liquid. The images are then used to create digital solid models from the polymeric physical model. The concept of the process, the hardware as a proof‐of‐concept demonstration, and results to understand the accuracy and limitations of the process are described.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Julia Christensen Hughes and Jonathan D. Christensen

Purpose: This chapter considers talent management in ‘situ’, at a time of unprecedented disruption, and identifies implications for practice and study.Methodology/approach

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter considers talent management in ‘situ’, at a time of unprecedented disruption, and identifies implications for practice and study.

Methodology/approach: We compare normative advice from the talent management literature with publicly available accounts of talent management strategies employed during the Covid-19 pandemic. We also include perceptions of employees from publicly available reviews (Glassdoor, 2020a), and a brief personal account.

Findings: Hospitality and tourism organisations are encountering unprecedented pressures for change, primarily due to Covid-19 as well as the sustainability and social justice movements. We identify three organisational responses to the pandemic – closing/contracting operations, consolidating around areas of strength, and creatively pivoting in new directions. Innovations in talent management were found to vary accordingly, including: humane downsizing and pay cuts; training and development (for managers and front-line employees, including in emotional intelligence, resilience, and delivering service excellence online); new talent acquisition, through new programmes, structures, roles, and partnerships; an enhanced employee value proposition, including safe and fun work environments, as well as improved pay and benefits; commitments to social equity and sustainability; courageous, creative, and resilient leadership; and effective communication. Despite these innovations, employee reviews suggest that top performing organisations continue to fall short on work–life balance, un-social working hours, inadequate compensation, and poor-quality managers.

Practical implications: Ever increasing business complexity requires skilled senior managers in multiple domains, and empowered, decentralised unit-level managerial and owner competence (with skills in emotional intelligence, collaboration, and negotiation). Front-line employees, capable of delivering excellence in customer service (despite disrupted circumstances), are more essential than ever. Successful enterprises, both now and in the future, will undoubtedly be those that prioritise talent, throughout all levels of organisation.

Research limitations/implications: Future research should undertake a more comprehensive investigation of talent management strategies employed (including from small business owners), as well as employee perceptions of their effectiveness (considering socio-economic differences as well as gender and race). Research is also needed with respect to the perceived value of organisational commitments to sustainability and social justice initiatives.

Originality/value: This chapter uniquely considers talent management at a time of crisis. Methodologically, it uses publicly available data of employee perceptions of their employers.

Details

Talent Management Innovations in the International Hospitality Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-307-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

J. Mueller, D. Williams, A. Higgins and M. Tou

In New Zealand, as in many other developed countries around the world, news is made not just by those many organizations with superb performance records, but also by the…

1910

Abstract

In New Zealand, as in many other developed countries around the world, news is made not just by those many organizations with superb performance records, but also by the few whose achievements fall far short of donor expectations and public perceptions. One of the core competencies of NPOs should be the ability to build strong donor relationships (Lewis, 1998), to create a sustainable income model which allows the organization to focus on their operational efforts. Funding uncertainties affect the ability to operate, to motivate and to plan for the future. Research (Mueller et al., 2004) was undertaken to determine how the relationship between NPOs and donors can be improved. This work focused on the identification of areas where NPOs need support to improve their governance and management functions. Both donors and NPOs were investigated, and the results were used to speculate in which areas external support would be most helpful and where donor/NPO perceptions differ. NPOs and donors indicated that they are aware that NPOs require both governance and managerial support. Both the NPOs and the donors indicated that an objective evaluation system would be valuable to them as evidence of credibility. Such a system would also help to guide the internal assessment process. These findings led to the development of the Looking Glass Evaluation Tool (LGET) which measures an organization along the following dimensions: effective management, strategic planning, advocacy, legal framework, governance and fundraising. The dimensions were derived partly from the work of Lester Salamon from the Nathan Cummings Foundation, New York. The LGET questions an organization about its levels of understanding, planning and implementation of governance and managerial functions and provides a snapshot of the organization’s structural effectiveness. The tool does not test the outcomes of the organization’s work; but speculates that an organization with poor internal structure will be less likely to perform sustainably, especially in the area of creating strong donor relationships. The tool is completed through a guided self‐assessment process, which is then reviewed with the organization to assure a clear understanding of the review objectives. From this snapshot of performance in a wide range of areas, organizations can focus resources on specific parts of their work for improvement. The LGET has been trialled in its prototype form in a number of NPOs in New Zealand, including a Maori charitable trust and has been favorably received.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Ana Krahmer

The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) supports newspaper preservation and access for any title in Texas, from any date, any location and representing any community…

1220

Abstract

Purpose

The Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP) supports newspaper preservation and access for any title in Texas, from any date, any location and representing any community. As an active member of the Texas Press Association, TDNP also supports large-scale preservation of born-digital newspaper PDF issues for member publishers. This paper aims to explore how the early days of TDNP built a strong foundation of collaboration and support for large-scale preservation projects, including support for preserving a state press association PDF newspaper collection.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a case study of a collaborative endeavor to create a large-scale, statewide digital newspaper preservation hub in Texas. This paper details how individual partnerships led to new and larger partnerships. Figures and tables represent numbers of partner institutions served, numbers of newspapers preserved and screenshots of how these items appear within collections on the digital repository environment of The Portal to Texas History. This paper concludes with recommendations for groups interested in developing their own collaborative projects.

Findings

As a case study, the data explored include numbers of partnering institutions, materials contributed by partnering institutions and how these numbers help to forward the TDNP agenda.

Practical Implications

The final recommendations are lessons learned through collaboration, and the implications are real-world advice from the partners developed through the TDNP.

Originality/value

Hosting over 3.25 million pages of newspapers, the TDNP has become an enormous hub of newspaper preservation in Texas, and it is unique in the numbers of partners it supports and the numbers of pages it is able to host for free access via The Portal to Texas History. This paper is intended to help other groups across the world build their own collaborative preservation efforts, and it offers pragmatic advice derived from hands-on experience.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Abstract

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The Emergence of the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-994-7

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The Emergence of the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-994-7

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Details

Evidence-Based Innovation Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-635-8

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Details

Evidence-Based Innovation Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-635-8

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Details

Evidence-Based Innovation Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-635-8

Abstract

Details

Evidence-Based Innovation Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-635-8

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