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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2012

Andrew Bruce, John Wills Lloyd and Michael J. Kennedy

Self-monitoring has become one of the most widely employed self-control procedures in special education for students with learning disabilities and emotional or behavioral…

Abstract

Self-monitoring has become one of the most widely employed self-control procedures in special education for students with learning disabilities and emotional or behavioral disorders. Although its success has been documented across age groups, settings, and diverse applications, researchers have continued to study the question of whether focusing self-monitoring on certain target behaviors – particularly attention to task or academic performance – will yield superior outcomes for students. We review 11 available studies that have examined this issue, classifying each study according to the ways in which the researchers had students monitor their own behavior. The results show only small differences among the different methods and indicate a need for teachers to continue exercising professional judgment in planning the use of self-monitoring.

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Classroom Behavior, Contexts, and Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-972-1

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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2012

James M. Kauffman, Andrew Bruce and John Wills Lloyd

We review the concept of response to intervention (RtI) as it is being applied to emotional and behavioral disorders (EDB) in the early part of the 21st century, examining…

Abstract

We review the concept of response to intervention (RtI) as it is being applied to emotional and behavioral disorders (EDB) in the early part of the 21st century, examining how it differs from and incorporates features of other approaches to addressing those problems, including pre-referral interventions, applied behavior analysis, functional behavioral assessment, curriculum-based measurement, positive behavioral interventions and supports, and special education. After discussing alternative concepts about how RtI might be applied to students with EBD, we note that our search of the literature revealed very few studies examining the application of RtI with students having EBD. We found both substantive and methodological problems in the studies we reviewed. For example, researchers did not describe adequately how students were selected for tiers, what dependent measures were chosen and why, what independent variables were manipulated, what criteria led to moving a child to a different tier, and how RtI addressed (or failed to address) the need for special education services. We conclude that, although some of the components of RtI have solid evidentiary bases, little evidence supports common claims of the benefits of RtI, especially as applied to students with EBD.

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Behavioral Disorders: Practice Concerns and Students with EBD
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-507-5

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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2012

Abstract

Details

Classroom Behavior, Contexts, and Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-972-1

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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2012

Abstract

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Behavioral Disorders: Practice Concerns and Students with EBD
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-507-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

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Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

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Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

John Young CBE

The problems of the Lloyd's insurance market over the past few years have been extensively reported. The market survived nevertheless and has since undergone extensive…

Abstract

The problems of the Lloyd's insurance market over the past few years have been extensively reported. The market survived nevertheless and has since undergone extensive restructuring to address the problems of the past. This has included a fundamental review of its regulatory framework. The new Financial Services and Markets Bill introduces oversight of Lloyd's by the Financial Services Authority (FSA), thus implementing the key recommendation of Lloyd's own review of its regulatory arrangements, published last year.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

G.C.G. Moore and Michael V. White

There is no exaggeration in the claim that abstract-deductive political economy in pre-Tractarian Oxford was driven by Richard Whately and hence centred at Oriel College…

Abstract

There is no exaggeration in the claim that abstract-deductive political economy in pre-Tractarian Oxford was driven by Richard Whately and hence centred at Oriel College. At this time Oriel was defined by a group of intellectuals now commonly referred to as the Oriel Noetics, of whom Whately was one, and the nature of Oxford political economy in the opening decades of the nineteenth century (including William F. Lloyd's contribution to it) cannot be understood outside the context of the intellectual tradition established by the Oriel Noetics. The Noetics were unconventional reformist clerics (one could not use the slippery mid-Victorian word ‘liberal’, as they were predominantly conservative Whigs or reform-minded Tories of the Pitt mould, in which order and tradition were maintained through moderate, but not radical, change); admired rational thought and absent-mindedly tested social conventions with their speech; were unafraid to question religious shibboleths if they deemed them bereft of scriptural foundation (such as Sabbatarianism); deployed logical processes to bolster their religious beliefs, which they held in an unsentimental fashion, and thereby to some extent practised that most contradictory of creeds, a logical faith; and, most importantly for this chapter, constructed a Christian Political Economy by dichotomising knowledge into a theological domain, in which they inferred from scriptural evidence that individuals should pursue the ends of attaining specific virtues (not utility!), and a scientific domain, in which they deduced scientific laws that would enable individuals to achieve the ends of attaining these virtues. They looked upon the rising Romantic Movement in general and the spiritualist yearnings of the Oxford Tractarians in particular with simple incomprehension, if not disgust. They deplored with equal measure the Evangelicals' enthusiasms, willing incogitency and lack of institutional anchor, yet sought to establish a broader national church that included dissenters (but not Catholics). They were most prominent in the 1810s and 1820s before colliding violently in the 1830s with, and being sidelined by, the Tractarians, many of whom they had, ironically enough, mentored and promoted.2

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English, Irish and Subversives among the Dismal Scientists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-061-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

John Booker

It is a measure of the problem of records control that branches of Lloyds Bank produce 30.5 million vouchers a month. On top of this is an array of wider documentation as…

Abstract

It is a measure of the problem of records control that branches of Lloyds Bank produce 30.5 million vouchers a month. On top of this is an array of wider documentation as defeating in bulk as it is complex in analysis. This paper follows the problem through the development of central control and assesses the place for the archivist in the management of documentary waste, and the benefit of his work for the historian.

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Records Management Journal, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2019

John Holland

Corporate financial communications concern public and private disclosure (Holland, 2005). This paper aims to explain how banks developed financial communications and how…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate financial communications concern public and private disclosure (Holland, 2005). This paper aims to explain how banks developed financial communications and how problems emerged in the global financial crisis. It explores policy responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Bank cases reveal construction and destruction of the social, knowledge and economic world of financial communications over two periods.

Findings

In the 1990s, learning about financial communications by a “dominant coalition” (Cyert, March, 1963) in bank top management was stimulated by gradual change. The management learnt how to accumulate social and cultural capital and developed “habitus” for disclosure (Bourdieu, 1986). From 2000, rapid change and secrecy factors accelerated bank internalisation of shareholder wealth maximising values, turning “habitus” in “market for information” (MFI) (Barker, 1998) into a “psychic prison” (Morgan,1986), creating riskier bank cultures (Schein, 2004) and constraining learning.

Research limitations/implications

The paper introduces sociological concepts to banking research and financial disclosures to increase the understanding about financial information and bank culture and about how regulation can avoid crises. Limitations reflect the small number of banks and range of qualitative data.

Practical implications

Regulators will have to make visible the change processes, new contexts and knowledge and connections to bank risk and performance through improved regulator action and bank public disclosure.

Social Implications

“Masking” and rituals (Andon and Free, 2012) restricted bank disclosure and weakened governance and market pressures on banks. These factors mediated bank failure and survival in 2008, as “psychic prisons” “fell apart”. Bank and MFI agents experienced a “cosmology episode” (Weick, 1988). Financial communications structures failed but were reconstructed by regulators.

Originality/value

The paper shows how citizens require transparency and contested accountability to democratise finance capitalism. Otherwise, problems will recur.

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Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Joanna Eley

The new Lloyd's Corporation building seems to be unique in terms of its exterior cleaning requirements as in so many other aspects. John Mitchell, Facilities Manager for…

Abstract

The new Lloyd's Corporation building seems to be unique in terms of its exterior cleaning requirements as in so many other aspects. John Mitchell, Facilities Manager for the 1986 Lloyd's building, is responsible for managing and maintaining a building unlike any other, and cannot look to colleagues for experience and advice.

Details

Facilities, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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