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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

John A. Piper, Barry Muir, Allister Stewart and John Willetts

Effective strategic analysis of existing and potential services requires a framework which is relevant and understandable to both clinicians and senior managers. Our work…

Abstract

Effective strategic analysis of existing and potential services requires a framework which is relevant and understandable to both clinicians and senior managers. Our work with NHS trusts has developed a framework based on analysis of services into four principal service streams ‐ emergency general hospital, non‐emergency general hospital, specialist general hospital and tertiary. Relating service streams to clinical specialties provides a matrix which can provide a basis for an initial analysis of the current and prospective clinical services portfolio, allowing drilling down into the detail and back up to the overall picture. Portfolio effectiveness is assessed by considering overall viability consisting of three interrelated elements ‐ clinical, market and financial viability. The inter‐relationship of service streams, clinical specialties and viability allows the trust board and key clinicians to share insights into the current and potential systemic linkages between these three elements and to develop a vision of future strategic direction.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1901

The Sanitary Committee of a certain County Council, strong with the strength of recent creation, have lately been animated by a desire to distinguish themselves in some…

Abstract

The Sanitary Committee of a certain County Council, strong with the strength of recent creation, have lately been animated by a desire to distinguish themselves in some way, and, proceeding along the lines of least resistance, they appear to have selected the Public Analyst as the most suitable object for attack. The charge against this unfortunate official was not that he is incompetent, or that he had been in any way negligent of his duties as prescribed by Act of Parliament, but simply and solely that he has the temerity to reside in London, which city is distant by a certain number of miles from the much favoured district controlled by the County Council aforesaid. The committee were favoured in their deliberations by the assistance of no less an authority than the “Principal” of a local “Technical School”;—and who could be more capable than he to express an opinion upon so simple a matter? This eminent exponent of scientific truths, after due and proper consideration, is reported to have delivered himself of the opinion that “scientifically it would be desirable that the analyst should reside in the district, as the delay occasioned by the sending of samples of water to London is liable to produce a misleading effect upon an analysis.” Apparently appalled by the contemplation of such possibilities, and strengthened by another expression of opinion to the effect that there were as “good men” in the district as in London, the committee resolved to recommend the County Council to determine the existing arrangement with the Public Analyst, and to appoint a “local analyst for all purposes.” Thus, the only objection which could be urged to the employment of a Public Analyst resident in London was the ridiculous one that the composition of a sample of water was likely to seriously alter during the period of its transit to London, and this contention becomes still more absurd when it is remembered that the examination of water samples is no part of the official duty of a Public Analyst. The employment of local scientific talent may be very proper when the object to be attained is simply the more or less imperfect instruction of the rising generation in the rudiments of what passes in this country for “technical education”; but the work of the Public Analyst is serious and responsible, and cannot be lightly undertaken by every person who may be acquainted with some of the uses of a test‐tube. The worthy members of this committee may find to their cost, as other committees have found before them, that persons possessing the requisite knowledge and experience are not necessarily indigenous to their district. Supposing that the County Council adopts the recommendation, the aspirations of the committee may even then be strangled in their infancy, as the Local Government Board will want to know all about the matter, and the committee will have to give serious and valid reasons in support of their case.

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British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1970

IN December, 1964, Messrs. A. G. Sheppard Fidler and Associates, of Epsom, were commissioned by the Epsom and Ewell Borough Council to prepare a project design for a new…

Abstract

IN December, 1964, Messrs. A. G. Sheppard Fidler and Associates, of Epsom, were commissioned by the Epsom and Ewell Borough Council to prepare a project design for a new building on a six‐acre site in Ewell, to house:—

Details

New Library World, vol. 71 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1923

The popular misconception which exists respecting the duties of a Public Analyst is well illustrated by the remarks attributed recently to a borough coroner.

Abstract

The popular misconception which exists respecting the duties of a Public Analyst is well illustrated by the remarks attributed recently to a borough coroner.

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British Food Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Joel Barnes

The purpose of this paper is to outline the structures of collegial governance in Australian universities between 1945 and the “Dawkins reforms” of the late 1980s. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the structures of collegial governance in Australian universities between 1945 and the “Dawkins reforms” of the late 1980s. It describes the historical contours of collegial governance in practice, the changes it underwent, and the structural limits within which it was able to operate.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based upon the writings of academics and university administrators from the period, with more fine-grained exemplification provided by archival and other evidence from Faculties of Arts and their equivalents in newer universities.

Findings

Elements of hierarchy and lateral organisation coexisted in the pre-Dawkins university in ways not generally made explicit in the existing literature. This mixture was sustained by ideals about academic freedom.

Research limitations/implications

By historicising “collegiality” the research problematises polemical uses of the term, either for or against. It also seeks to clarify the distinctiveness of contemporary structures—especially for those with no first-hand experience of the pre-Dawkins university—by demonstrating historical difference without resort to nostalgia.

Originality/value

“Collegiality” is a common concept in education and organisation studies, as well as in critiques of the contemporary corporate university. However, the concept has received little sustained historical investigation. A clearer history of collegial governance is valuable both in its own right and as a conceptually clarifying resource for contemporary analyses of collegiality and managerialism.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Robert B. Ellis and David S. Waller

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the early days of marketing education by observing the first “Marketing” subject in Australia, which was taught at the University…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the early days of marketing education by observing the first “Marketing” subject in Australia, which was taught at the University of Melbourne, and comparing elements of the early subject to the introductory Marketing subject of today.

Design/methodology/approach

The information used for this study was obtained from material in the University of Melbourne Archives, including calendar entries, subject descriptions, and university announcements, as well as from interviews and correspondence with various people including those in academic and administrative positions, and former students.

Findings

The origins of university-level marketing education in Australia can be seen to have been shaped by several influences, including: the external environment of the country at that time; the areas of interest of academic staff; the availability of teaching material – textbooks, academic articles, appropriate case studies, academic research papers, etc.; the academic staff and teaching materials from the USA; and the extent to which the supporting technology of marketing had changed.

Practical implications

By observing the development in marketing education over the years, from its beginnings in Australia at the University of Melbourne, this paper shows changes in the content which assists in the understanding of what has led to how marketing is taught in Australasian universities and colleges today.

Originality/value

Marketing education research usually focusses on what is happening at the moment, so the value of this study is that it is one of the few that looks at marketing education from a historical perspective.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

John W. Kirriemuir and Peter Willett

Clustering the output of a multi‐database online search enables a user to obtain an overview of the information that has been retrieved without the need to inspect any…

Abstract

Clustering the output of a multi‐database online search enables a user to obtain an overview of the information that has been retrieved without the need to inspect any documents that contain only redundant information. In this paper we describe a classification scheme that characterises the degree of relationship between pairs of documents in database search‐outputs and then report the application of a range of clustering methods and similarity coefficients to 20 such outputs. These experiments demonstrate that clustering is capable of grouping documents that are identical to, or closely‐related to, other documents in the search‐output on the basis of their term similarities.

Details

Program, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

JOHN E. BURNETT, DAVID COOPER, MICHAEL F. LYNCH, PETER WILLETT and MAUREEN WYCHERLEY

A study has been made of the effect of controlled variations in indexing vocabulary size on retrieval performance using the Cranfield 200 and 1400 test collections. The…

Abstract

A study has been made of the effect of controlled variations in indexing vocabulary size on retrieval performance using the Cranfield 200 and 1400 test collections. The vocabularies considered are sets of variable‐length character strings chosen from the fronts of document and query terms so as to occur with approximate equifrequency. Sets containing between 120 and 720 members were tested both using an application of the Cluster Hypothesis and in a series of linear associative retrieval experiments. The effectiveness of the smaller sets is low but the larger ones exhibit retrieval characteristics comparable to those of words.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Thomas Willett

The purpose of this paper is to discuss implications of the global crisis for economic and financial research and policy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss implications of the global crisis for economic and financial research and policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews many recent studies on the crisis and offers the author's views on some of the most important lessons to be drawn from the crisis

Findings

The review counters views that the crisis reflected a basic failure of economics, but agrees that it undercuts some particular theories and approaches to economics. More attention needs to be given to imperfections in the operation of both markets and governments, drawing on insights from behavioral and neuro economics and finance and political economy analysis and recognizing the importance of limited information and uncertainty about correct models. The creation of perverse incentive structures explain a large part of the financial excesses that led to the crisis. Financial considerations need to be integrated much more closely with macroeconomic analysis and financial risk analysis needs to pay more attention to economic considerations. Useful insights can be drawn from many different theories and approaches and we should not expect any one theory to have all the answers. The excesses observed in the advanced economies do not imply that there are not enormous benefits to be gained from further financial liberalization in emerging market economies, but they do show that great care must be taken in establishing strong supervision of such liberalizations and highlight many of the dangers to look out for.

Originality/value

The paper offers a guide to the literature for those interested in learning more about the causes and effects of the crisis and policy responses and offers a number of suggestions for fruitful research topics and policy strategies.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

John Hollis

Examines a re‐engineering programme undertaken by Littlewoods chain stores in an attempt to improve the company’s image and financial results. Describes the problems faced…

Abstract

Examines a re‐engineering programme undertaken by Littlewoods chain stores in an attempt to improve the company’s image and financial results. Describes the problems faced by the organization and the measures taken to improve the situation: key strategies were identified and senior staff were designated specific tasks. Outlines the key points in the process; the re‐engineering of the supply chain, the involvement of all staff and the two‐way communication system and openness of management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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