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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Junye Wang, Xiaoxian Zhang, Anthony G. Bengough and John W. Crawford

The cell‐based method of domain decomposition was first introduced for complex 3D geometries. To further assess the method, the aim is to carry out flow simulation in…

Abstract

Purpose

The cell‐based method of domain decomposition was first introduced for complex 3D geometries. To further assess the method, the aim is to carry out flow simulation in rectangular ducts to compare the known analytical solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is not based on equal subvolumes but on equal numbers of active cells. The variables of the simulation are stored in ordered 1D arrays to replace the conventional 3D arrays, and the domain decomposition of the complex 3D problems therefore becomes 1D. Finally, the 3D results can be recovered using a coordinate matrix. Through the flow simulation in the rectangular ducts how the algorithm of the domain decompositions works was illustrated clearly, and the numerical solution was compared with the exact solutions.

Findings

The cell‐based method can find the subdomain interfaces successfully. The parallelization based on the algorithm does not cause additional errors. The numerical results agree well with the exact solutions. Furthermore, the results of the parallelization show again that domains of 3D geometries can be decomposed automatically without inducing load imbalances.

Practical implications

Although, the approach is illustrated with lattice Boltzmann method, it is also applicable to other numerical methods in fluid dynamics and molecular dynamics.

Originality/value

Unlike the existing methods, the cell‐based method performs the load balance first based on the total number of fluid cells and then decomposes the domain into a number of groups (or subdomains). Thus, the task of the cell‐based method is to recover the interface rather than to balance the load as in the traditional methods. This work has examined the celled‐based method for the flow in rectangular ducts. The benchmark test confirms that the cell‐based domain decomposition is reliable and convenient in comparison with the well‐known exact solutions.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

A. Savini

Gives introductory remarks about chapter 1 of this group of 31 papers, from ISEF 1999 Proceedings, in the methodologies for field analysis, in the electromagnetic…

1032

Abstract

Gives introductory remarks about chapter 1 of this group of 31 papers, from ISEF 1999 Proceedings, in the methodologies for field analysis, in the electromagnetic community. Observes that computer package implementation theory contributes to clarification. Discusses the areas covered by some of the papers ‐ such as artificial intelligence using fuzzy logic. Includes applications such as permanent magnets and looks at eddy current problems. States the finite element method is currently the most popular method used for field computation. Closes by pointing out the amalgam of topics.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

22367

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1929

THE PRESIDENT of the Library Association for 1929–30 will be Lord Balneil, the son of the Earl of Crawford, and it is difficult to think of a better choice. Lord Balneil…

Abstract

THE PRESIDENT of the Library Association for 1929–30 will be Lord Balneil, the son of the Earl of Crawford, and it is difficult to think of a better choice. Lord Balneil has an admirable bibliographical ancestry—if we may so put it—seeing that his grandfather, the 26th Earl of Crawford, was President in 1898; and the Haigh Hall Library at the family seat is one of the noble private libraries of England. Lord Balneil is the Chairman of the Appeal Committee for the endowment of the School of Librarianship and so has already identified himself in a practical manner with the cause of libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

JOHN C. CRAWFORD

The island of Arran is situated in the Firth of Clyde astride the Highland Boundary fault zone. It is 19 miles long by 10 miles wide. Although similar in size to the Isle…

Abstract

The island of Arran is situated in the Firth of Clyde astride the Highland Boundary fault zone. It is 19 miles long by 10 miles wide. Although similar in size to the Isle of Wight it has only a twenty‐fifth of that island's population. The number of inhabitants in 1981 (4743) is almost the same as in 1755 (4600). The island's population reached its highest level in 1821 (6541) and fell steadily for the rest of the century, reaching a figure similar to its present level in 1911.

Details

Library Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1907

THE enterprise of two London newspapers, the Tribune (for the second time) and the Daily Chronicle, in organizing exhibitions of books affords a convenient excuse for once…

Abstract

THE enterprise of two London newspapers, the Tribune (for the second time) and the Daily Chronicle, in organizing exhibitions of books affords a convenient excuse for once again bringing forward proposals for a more permanent exhibition. On many occasions during the past twenty years the writer has made suggestions for the establishment of a central book bazaar, to which every kind of book‐buyer could resort in order to see and handle the latest literature on every subject. An experiment on wrong lines was made by the Library Bureau about fifteen years ago, but here, as in the exhibitions above mentioned, the arrangement was radically bad. Visiting the Daily Chronicle show in company with other librarians, and taking careful note of the planning, one was struck by the inutility of having the books arranged by publishers and not by subjects. Not one visitor in a hundred cares twopence whether books on electricity, biography, history, travel, or even fairy tales, are issued by Longmans, Heinemann, Macmillan, Dent or any other firm. What everyone wants to see is all the recent and latest books on definite subjects collected together in one place. The arrangements at the Chronicle and Tribune shows are just a jumble of old and new books placed in show‐cases by publishers' names, similar to the abortive exhibition held years ago in Bloomsbury Street. What the book‐buyer wants is not a miscellaneous assemblage of books of all periods, from 1877 to date, arranged in an artistic show‐case and placed in charge of a polite youth who only knows his own books—and not too much about them—but a properly classified and arranged collection of the newest books only, which could be expounded by a few experts versed in literature and bibliography. What is the use of salesmen in an exhibition where books are not sold outright? If these exhibitions were strictly limited to the newest books only, there would be much less need for salesmen to be retained as amateur detectives. Another decided blemish on such an exhibition is the absence of a general catalogue. Imagine any exhibition on business lines in which visitors are expected to cart away a load of catalogues issued separately by the various exhibitors and all on entirely different plans of arrangement! The British publisher in nearly everything he does is one of the most hopeless Conservatives in existence. He will not try anything which has not been done by his grandfather or someone even more remote, so that publishing methods remain crystallized almost on eighteenth century lines. The proposal about to be made is perhaps far too revolutionary for the careful consideration of present‐day publishers, but it is made in the sincere hope that it may one day be realized. It has been made before without any definite details, but its general lines have been discussed among librarians for years past.

Details

New Library World, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1928

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so…

Abstract

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so, rising from the greater value placed upon the recreations of the people in recent decades. It has the name of the pleasure city of the north, a huge caravansary into which the large industrial cities empty themselves at the holiday seasons. But Blackpool is more than that; it is a town with a vibrating local life of its own; it has its intellectual side even if the casual visitor does not always see it as readily as he does the attractions of the front. A week can be spent profitably there even by the mere intellectualist.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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