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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

John R. Vincent and Peter Hillman

Describes how John Brown Engineering and Constructors has set up project workshops for all involved parties to work together in a partnership environment. Reviews an…

Abstract

Describes how John Brown Engineering and Constructors has set up project workshops for all involved parties to work together in a partnership environment. Reviews an approach combining the partnering style and the TQM philosophy. Contends that the design of the project workshop is crucial and it is important that it takes a holistic view of the problems identified. Concludes that competitive advantage will go to those who learn better ways to work together, and then rationally deploy this knowledge to the benefit of all. Partnering is teamwork between companies ‐ project workshops provide the chance to try it out, to train in it, and to excel.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Dave Muddiman, Shiraz Durrani, John Pateman, Martin Dutch, Rebecca Linley and John Vincent

The executive summary of the report of an 18‐month research project on public library policy and social exclusion based at Leeds Metropolitan University and conducted in…

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Abstract

The executive summary of the report of an 18‐month research project on public library policy and social exclusion based at Leeds Metropolitan University and conducted in partnership with the London Borough of Merton (Libraries), Sheffield Libraries, Archives and Information Services, and John Vincent, an independent consultant. Briefly describes the background to the research and gives a summary of the study findings and the main conclusions and recommendations. The study examines the context of social exclusion and the nature of the problems facing public libraries and other public institutions in tackling disadvantage.

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New Library World, vol. 102 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

John Vincent

This chapter considers the current state of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ+) librarianship in the United Kingdom. It begins with a question…

Abstract

This chapter considers the current state of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ+) librarianship in the United Kingdom. It begins with a question: at the time of writing, there seems to be more of a focus on LGBTQ+ issues in museums and archives than there is in libraries. Why is this so? To answer this, the chapter focuses briefly on the wider social setting; looks at current library provision; discusses what “queer librarianship” might involve; considers whether LGBTQ+ library staff’s and LGBTQ+ library users’ voices are heard; and then looks at the question of mainstreaming provision, and considers whether this would be a positive step forward.

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LGBTQ+ Librarianship in the 21st Century: Emerging Directions of Advocacy and Community Engagement in Diverse Information Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-474-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1965

Daniel Hay

WRITING on ‘The Personality of John Scotus’ Fr. Vincent Fochtmann, O.F.M., says:

Abstract

WRITING on ‘The Personality of John Scotus’ Fr. Vincent Fochtmann, O.F.M., says:

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Library Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

John Lyne, Michelle Hill, Patricia Burke and Martina Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to examine an audit that was performed of all patients referred to a liaison psychiatry inpatient consultation service which sought to…

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637

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine an audit that was performed of all patients referred to a liaison psychiatry inpatient consultation service which sought to establish a baseline for demographics, type of referral, and management of referrals, with a view to introducing improved evidence‐based treatments. It also aims to examine timeliness of response to referrals benchmarked against published standards.

Design/methodology/approach

All inpatient referrals to a liaison psychiatry service were recorded over a six‐month period, including demographics, diagnosis, management and timeliness of response to referrals. The data were retrospectively analysed and compared against international standards.

Findings

A total of 172 referrals were received in the six months. Commonest referral reasons included assessments regarding depressive disorders (23.8 per cent), delirium/other cognitive disorders (19.2 per cent), alcohol‐related disorders (18.6 per cent), anxiety disorders (14.5 per cent), and risk management (12.2 per cent). Evidence‐based practices were not utilised effectively for a number of different types of presentations. A total of 40.1 per cent of referrals were seen on the same day, 75.4 per cent by the end of the next day, and 93.4 per cent by the end of the following day.

Practical implications

Use of a hospital protocol for management of delirium may improve outcomes for these patients. Evidence‐based techniques, such as brief intervention therapies, may be beneficial for referrals involving alcohol dependence. Referrals were seen reasonably quickly, but there is room for improvement when compared with published standards.

Originality/value

This paper provides valuable information for those involved in management of liaison psychiatry consultation services, providing ideas for development and implementation of evidence based practices.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

John S. Hill and John Vincent

In 2005 Manchester United was taken over by US businessman Malcolm Glazer, in part because of the club's brand name prominence in the global sport of soccer. This paper…

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Abstract

In 2005 Manchester United was taken over by US businessman Malcolm Glazer, in part because of the club's brand name prominence in the global sport of soccer. This paper examines how Manchester United rose to a pre-eminent position in world football through its on-field performances and its off-the-field management strategies. It shows how the club took its storied history into world markets to take full advantage of globalisation, the opportunities extended through the English Premier League's reputation and developments in global media technologies. Astute management of club resources is identified as the major factor in global brand management.

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

John Vincent

– The purpose of this paper is to highlight work with older people being undertaken by public libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight work with older people being undertaken by public libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on responses from libraries working with older people, outlining their approaches, and also on the report, “Library services for older people – good practice guide”.

Findings

There is a large and varied programme of work being delivered by public libraries and their partner organisations. However, much of it is “under the radar”, so, when spending cuts are made, the knock-on effects are often not recognised.

Practical implications

Highlights examples of work that other library services could replicate. Also highlights work that potential partner organisations may not know about, and therefore can use this paper as a “way in” to libraries. Stresses the importance of recognising the wide range of people under the umbrella term, “older people”.

Social implications

This paper aims to draw attention to a key area of work which may not be well known outside libraries themselves, with the potential to bring other partners and funders on board.

Originality/value

The paper draws together examples of different initiatives developed by public libraries, all of which have an enormous impact on the older people (and their families) involved.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1966

IF we count the University of Strathclyde School of Librarianship as a “new” school—rather than simply an old school transferred from a College of Commerce to a…

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Abstract

IF we count the University of Strathclyde School of Librarianship as a “new” school—rather than simply an old school transferred from a College of Commerce to a university—then four “new” schools were established between 1963 and 1964, three of the four in universities and the other closely linked with a university, though remaining independent. All four schools have their special features but I consider the more significant of Belfast's features to be its right, from the outset, to conduct all its own examinations for graduates and non‐graduates. Queen's was also the first British university to provide non‐graduates with courses in librarianship. (Strathclyde is the second.) All successful students are eligible for admission to the Register of Chartered Librarians (ALA) after they have completed the prescribed period of practical experience.

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Christine Redman and John Terence Vincent

The purpose of this study is to examine questioning opportunities afforded by interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by highlighting pedagogical decisions enacted by teachers to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine questioning opportunities afforded by interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by highlighting pedagogical decisions enacted by teachers to ensure that they work with the wider affordances of the device.

Design/methodology/approach

Three primary/elementary teachers participated in a study designed to identify the types of questions that teachers could enable, sustain and afford with an IWB. The teachers selected lessons to be videotaped. Pre- and post-lessons interviews were held with each teacher. Pre-lesson interviews sought the intent of the lesson and intended use of the IWB. Post-lesson interviews included teachers reviewing videotapes of the lessons and teachers reflecting on, reviewing and explaining significant and key events. They provided their reasons and justification behind their informed choices.

Findings

Teachers enacted a framework that demonstrated their commitment to developing communities of learners. They sought strategic ways to utilise the IWB in dialogically focussed classrooms. Teachers used IWBs to sustain conversations that raise and resolve their learners’ questions, to present challenges to the group.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a small number of participants, but is fine-grained in analysis. The recorded lessons have only occurred in mathematics classes. Lesson sequences are short, and a longer sequence, over eight weeks, would have also been illuminating.

Originality/value

The study is unique in showing the shift in power and ownership between interactions among the teacher, students and the IWB.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Graham Willett

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Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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