Search results

1 – 10 of 151
Article
Publication date: 17 March 2022

Kamal Dhawan, John Tookey, Ali GhaffarianHoseini and Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini

A long-term collaborative public water infrastructure procurement contract in New Zealand adopts “Enterprise Alliance” delivery (strategy) with a Construction…

Abstract

Purpose

A long-term collaborative public water infrastructure procurement contract in New Zealand adopts “Enterprise Alliance” delivery (strategy) with a Construction Consolidation Centre (CCC) (operational) logistics solution. New Zealand's unique spatial, market, regulatory and economic circumstances present a research gap pertaining to the sustainability impacts of the combinatory implementation. The paper suggests a literature review-based research framework for examining these.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic literature review (SLR) discovers unique New Zealand attributes, and sustainability impacts of both the approaches overseas. Towards formulating a research framework, the paper discusses sustainability of construction and its New Zealand context, and research focus within the implemented model. Significant issues from SLR reveal Design, Logistics, Impacts and Spin-offs research domains. The paper suggests a research framework and examines an appropriate research design.

Findings

CCC implementation under a programme alliance is without precedent in New Zealand. Variance of New Zealand's unique attributes from North American and European characteristics behind successful implementation are likely to impact domestic outcomes. A research framework to test this hypothesis will enable investigating the relevance of the concepts to New Zealand settings and provide a contextual implementation datum. Implementation benchmarks will potentially influence public policy and enrich indigenous knowledge corpus, potentially transferrable to associated domains (urban planning, transportation and energy).

Originality/value

The paper attempts to define a research direction in the domain of applying supply chain management principles to the New Zealand's construction sector by investigating the employment of a CCC in a collaborative environment as an infrastructure project delivery vehicle with sustainability leanings.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Johnson Adafin, Suzanne Wilkinson, James O.B. Rotimi, Casimir MacGregor, John Tookey and Regan Potangaroa

This study aims to examine how innovation can be accelerated within the New Zealand (NZ) building industry to improve the productivity and efficiency of the industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how innovation can be accelerated within the New Zealand (NZ) building industry to improve the productivity and efficiency of the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a mixed philosophical approach combining interpretivism and post-positivism. Data for the study were obtained through a focus group of 50 practitioners that were selected using a stratified sampling procedure. All focus group data were audio-recorded, notes of the discussions were taken and then transcribed, de-identified and managed using NVivo software. Data analysis was undertaken using thematic analysis and inductive reasoning consistent with interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

The study findings revealed that the industry could benefit from the adoption of new and emerging technologies to improve its performance, especially its productivity and efficiency. Key drivers for the adoption of innovative practices included the adaptation of “local best practices” from case studies that would consist of stories of successful innovations that could foster confidence in future innovation. It was also identified that Government and industry should nurture innovation through collaborative contracts, policies and regulations. Further, it was highlighted that a culture of innovation needed to be developed to help nurture competencies and capability within the industry workforce.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an in-depth examination of the need for innovation from the point of view of building industry practitioners. This study provides a useful starting-off point for further research and for the creation of policies that could help to support and accelerate innovation within the NZ building industry.

Practical implications

NZ’s building industry productivity and efficiency have been sub-optimal relative to other industries. But using evidence from the experiences and knowledge of industry practitioners, strategies can be developed to accelerate innovation within the NZ building industry that could help reverse industry performance. Further, the research findings can help inform government policies to develop support mechanisms that could encourage innovation in the industry in NZ. In addition, it is anticipated that the findings will provide a useful set of guidance for other countries that have similar market and physical constraints as those encountered by NZ.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of empirical studies on innovation in the NZ building industry which the current study contributes to. By sharing industry practitioners’ experiences and knowledge of innovation, the paper seeks to counteract more technocratic and technological optimist accounts of innovation within the building industry. Further, the paper provides insights into how the NZ building industry can transform its performance through innovation.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Nan Zhao, Fei J. Ying and John Tookey

In the construction sector, the knowledge-based process outgrows its emphasis on technological aspects. Yet, there is a lack of applied studies showing how a procurement…

Abstract

Purpose

In the construction sector, the knowledge-based process outgrows its emphasis on technological aspects. Yet, there is a lack of applied studies showing how a procurement system (PS) could be selected in the digital age. In particular, there is a radical need to establish an innovative process to visualise novel PS decision. Therefore, this paper aims to present a knowledge visualised framework for aiding construction PS decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the construction of process innovation. The framework (process) is supported by four influential decision supporting methods (mean utility values, analytic hierarchy process, fuzzy set theory and Delphi method) and computer programming (Matlab).

Findings

There are four stages of this framework: (1) uniform rating for decision alternatives; (2) group decision for determining the decision attribute; (3) determining the final choice; (4) reporting the cognitive computing process. Supported by individual and groups decision dynamics, this framework emphasises how the dashboard aided innovative approach enables the induction of understanding, cognitive computing for decision-making and how the information would precisely be represented, which are vital requirements of modern construction.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper presents two leverage points that support the modern PS decision. Firstly, this paper provides a holistic view of the decision supporting methods on the basis of how a suitable PS would be systematically sought. Based on the existing studies, this paper upgrades into a visualised knowledge decision supporting process. It helps the participants understand and improve their cognitive learning. Secondly, this framework allows the participants to have a view of the individual and group decisions. It sheds light on the development of the collaborative decision-making process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Fei J. Ying, Nan Zhao and John Tookey

Best value procurement (BVP) has been recognized for some time as offering significant opportunities to advance process excellence in the construction sector. As an…

Abstract

Purpose

Best value procurement (BVP) has been recognized for some time as offering significant opportunities to advance process excellence in the construction sector. As an innovative approach to strategic procurement, BVP has attracted attention from the New Zealand (NZ) Government. It has similarly been found that the most substantial benefit of this modified approach to procurement is in value creation and innovative organizational processes through identifying “best value.” Yet to date, there is a lack of robust evidence as to how BVP can exactly influence construction innovation. Accordingly, this paper aims to explore how to improve BVP implementation to promote construction innovation and what are the values to be achieved in BVP mega projects from the view of innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with 22 participants, including project managers, procurement specialists, engineers and general managers from three organization types, were conducted to explore BVP implementation in a range of mega construction projects in NZ.

Findings

Barriers to BVP implementation and value innovation have been identified in this paper. Data analysis suggested traditional mindset in the procurement process, market constraints, mistrusts and fuzzy definition of BVP are the challenges for BVP implementation; BVP cultivates organizational competition because of diverse collaboration models and value attitudes; and BVP considers more values from the whole supply chain. To promote innovative construction, existing BVP should consider adopting progressive enhancements toward updating procurement guidance, encouraging effective communications, collaborating and promoting changes in stakeholders’ mindset.

Practical implications

Identified barriers to BVP implementation set up a platform for framing guidance, which could provide an effective approach as it enables a better understanding of what BVP means to NZ and what needs to be overcome. Taking this into account, similar small size markets around the world would be able to consider the applicability of BVP for innovative improvements.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into value concepts in project procurement. It theoretically and practically possesses originality in linking BVP to innovative construction. The study of BVP and its application further reveals the importance of establishing a distinct regulation and fostering organizational competition from value aspects to achieve construction innovation.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Okechukwu Nwadigo, Nicola Naismith Naismith, Ali Ghaffarianhoseini, Amirhosein Ghaffarian Hoseini and John Tookey

A construction project is complex and requires dynamic modelling of a range of factors that deters time performance because of uncertainty and varying operating…

Abstract

Purpose

A construction project is complex and requires dynamic modelling of a range of factors that deters time performance because of uncertainty and varying operating conditions. In construction project systems, the system components are the interconnected stages, which are time-dependent. Within the project stages are the activities which are the subsystems of the system components, causing a challenge to the analysis of the complex system. The relationship of construction project time management (CTM) with the construction project time influencing factors (CTFs) and the adaptability of the time-varying system is a key part of project effectiveness. This study explores the relationship between CTM and CTF, including the potentials to add dynamical changes on every project stage.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposed a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) model to examine the relationship between CTM and CTF. The model investigates the time performance of a construction project that enhances decision-making. First, the paper establishes a model of probabilistic reasoning and directed acrylic graph (DAG). Second, the study tests the dynamic impact (IM) of CTM-CTF on the project stages over a specific time, including the adaptability of time performance during disruptive CTF events. In demonstrating the effectiveness of the model, the authors selected one-organisation-single-location road-improvement project as the case study. Next, the confirmation of the model internal validity relied on conditional probabilities and the project knowledge experts' selected from the case company.

Findings

The study produced structural dependencies of CTM and CTF with probability observations at each stage. A predictive time performance analysis of the model at different scenarios evaluates the adaptability of CTM during CTF uncertain events. The case demonstration of the model application shows that CTFs have effects on CTM strategy, creating the observations to help time performance restorations after disruptions.

Research limitations/implications

Although the case company experts' panel confirms the internal validity of the results for managing time, the model used conditional probability table (CPT) and project state values from a project contract. A project-wide application then will require multi-case data and data-mining process for generating the CPTs.

Practical implications

The study developed a method for evaluating both quantitative and qualitative relationships between CTM and CTF, besides the knowledge to enhance CTM practice and research. In construction, the project team can use model observations to implement time performance restorations after a predictive or reactive disruption, which enhances decision-making.

Originality/value

The model used qualitative and qualitative data of a complex system to generate results, bounded by a range of probability distributions for CTM-CTF interconnections during time performance disruptions and restorations. The research explores the approach that can complement the mental CTM-CTF modeling of the project team. The CTM-CTF relationship model developed in this research is fundamental knowledge for future research, besides the valuable insight into CTF influence on CTM.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Fei Ying, John Tookey and Jeff Seadon

Construction logistics is an essential part of Construction Supply Chain Management for both project management and cost aspects. The quantum of money that is embodied in…

1717

Abstract

Purpose

Construction logistics is an essential part of Construction Supply Chain Management for both project management and cost aspects. The quantum of money that is embodied in the transportation of materials to site could be 39–58 per cent of total logistics costs and between 4 and 10 per cent of the product selling price for many firms. However, limited attention has been paid to measure the logistics performance at the operational level in the construction industry. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge about managing logistics costs by setting a key performance indicator (KPI) based on the number of vehicle movements to the construction site.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was adopted with on-site observations and interviews. Observations were performed from the start of construction until “hand-over” to the building owner. A selection of construction suppliers and subcontractors involved in the studied project were interviewed.

Findings

Data analysis of vehicle movements suggested that construction transportation costs can be monitored and managed. The identified number of vehicle movements as a KPI offers a significant step towards logistics performance management in construction projects.

Originality/value

This research paper demonstrates that framework of using vehicular movements meet the criterion of effective KPI and is able to detect rooms for improvements. The key findings shed valuable insight for industry practitioners in initiating the measurement and monitor “the invisible logistics costs and performance”. It provides a basis for benchmarking that enables comparison, learning and improvement and thereby continuous enhancement of best practice at the operational level, which may accelerate the slow SCM implementation in the construction industry.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Jeff Seadon and John E. Tookey

The New Zealand construction sector is similar to many other countries with a few large companies and many small and micro enterprises. It seeks to achieve a 20 per cent…

1085

Abstract

Purpose

The New Zealand construction sector is similar to many other countries with a few large companies and many small and micro enterprises. It seeks to achieve a 20 per cent increase in productivity by 2020 which requires a step change in how the sector operates and buy-in from key stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to provide a set of levers to improve productivity in the construction sector and develop an implementation schedule.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a systems approach taking account of the nature of the building sector and the whole life cycle of a building from design to end-of-life. Information gained from the post-construction phases informs the pre-construction and construction phases.

Findings

Productivity is an integrated model whereby increases in process efficiency are executed with quality materials and workmanship, in a manner that is affordable for both the client and contractor and sustainable over time. A series of interviews and workshops produced 10 nodal points and 19 crucial levers which were prioritised for implementation. Additionally, indicators were developed to monitor progress over time and provide information for further corrective action to the system.

Practical implications

The effect of using a few targeted levers in unison provided significantly more gains than individual applications. Modelling real world responses to process stimuli outlined in this paper is extremely valuable. This provided the opportunity for key construction stakeholders to estimate the effects of decision making during a project.

Originality/value

Previous studies identified factors affecting productivity. Piecemeal approaches to improve productivity have resulted in systemic failure. A whole of life approach provides valuable insights to improve productivity in the construction and pre-construction phases which have a flow-on effect through the life cycle. Importantly, this research proposes drivers, an implementation scheme and indicators that provide leverage on nodal points to improve productivity.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Okechukwu Bruno-Kizito Nwadigo, Nicola Naismith, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini and John Tookey

Dynamic planning and scheduling forms a widely adopted smart strategy for solving real-world problems in diverse business systems. This paper uses deductive content…

Abstract

Purpose

Dynamic planning and scheduling forms a widely adopted smart strategy for solving real-world problems in diverse business systems. This paper uses deductive content analysis to explore secondary data from previous studies in dynamic planning and scheduling to draw conclusions on its current status, forward action and research needs in construction management.

Design/methodology/approach

We searched academic databases using planning and scheduling keywords without a periodic setting. This research collected secondary data from the database to draw an objective comparison of categories and conclusions about how the data relates to planning and scheduling to avoid the subjective responses from questionnaires and interviews. Then, applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, we selected one hundred and four articles. Finally, the study used a seven-step deductive content analysis to develop the categorisation matrix and sub-themes for describing the dynamic planning and scheduling categories. We used deductive analysis because of the secondary data and categories comparison. Using the event types represented in a quadrant mapping, we delve into where, when, application and benefits of the classes.

Findings

The content analysis showed that all the accounts and descriptions of dynamic planning and scheduling are identifiable in an extensive research database. The content analysis reveals the need for multi-hybrid (4D BIM-Agent based-discrete event-discrete rate-system dynamics) simulation modelling and optimisation method for proffering solutions to scheduling and planning problems, its current status, tools and obstacles.

Originality/value

This research reveals the deductive content analysis talent in construction research. It also draws direction, focuses and raises a question on dynamic planning and scheduling research concerning the five-integrated model, an opportunity for their integration, models combined attributes and insight into its solution viability in construction.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Dat Tien Doan, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Nicola Naismith, Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini, Tongrui Zhang and John Tookey

Green building information modelling (BIM) has been highlighted as an essential topic owing to its potential benefits. However, both Green Star and BIM are still in their…

Abstract

Purpose

Green building information modelling (BIM) has been highlighted as an essential topic owing to its potential benefits. However, both Green Star and BIM are still in their earlier stages in New Zealand. This paper aims to examine and evaluate the benefits, barriers/challenges and solutions for the integration of Green Star and BIM in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a total of 77 responses collected from construction professionals in New Zealand using questionnaires were analysed through descriptive and statistical tests.

Findings

Building performance modelling used for Green Star assessment can be implemented using BIM; this was highlighted as the most significant benefit of the integration. Whereas, the most significant barrier preventing the integration of Green Star and BIM was the fact they are two completely separate processes. Regarding the solutions for the integration, showcasing BIM-Green Star benchmark projects was considered as the most effective solution amongst a range of eight provided.

Originality/value

The research provided insights into Green Star–BIM integration in New Zealand. By evaluating the significance of the benefits, barriers/challenges and solutions for the integration, this research could be used as a guideline for Green Star and BIM development by New Zealand Green Building Council (NZGBC), the Government and construction practitioners in New Zealand. Specifically, the results here could be valuable inputs for Green Star manuals and the New Zealand BIM handbook.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Dat Tien Doan, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Nicola Naismith, Amirhosein Ghaffarianhoseini, Tongrui Zhang and John Tookey

This research aims to explore the perspectives of the key actors in the New Zealand construction industry towards BIM adoption. Specifically, four themes are examined…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the perspectives of the key actors in the New Zealand construction industry towards BIM adoption. Specifically, four themes are examined, including what BIM is; BIM knowledge and understanding; benefits of BIM adoption; and challenges/barriers to BIM adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach using 21 semi-structured interviews with industry experts was adopted.

Findings

The results raise a question concerning whether the New Zealand construction industry needs a unique definition of BIM to achieve a clear and consistent understanding amongst construction practitioners. It was found out that most of the construction practitioners in New Zealand are not well aware of BIM, especially the contractors, QSs, supply chain companies and the SMEs. Fourteen potential benefits and ten barriers/challenges to BIM adoption were identified. Individually, time-saving was considered as the most benefit of BIM adoption while BIM understanding was suggested as the most significant barrier by all the interviewees.

Originality/value

The research provides valuable insights into BIM understanding as well as recommendations regarding BIM adoption in New Zealand. The results could be considered baseline information for the companies and government to have effective strategies towards BIM adoption. Furthermore, it confirms that characteristics such as benefits and barriers to BIM adoption amongst different countries could be similar. Therefore, it could be useful to analyse the studies, strategies and practices of the pioneer countries in BIM adoption for the implementation.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

1 – 10 of 151