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Sandra A. Lawrence, Ashlea C. Troth, Peter J. Jordan and Amy L. Collins

Research in industrial and organizational psychology demonstrates that the regulation of negative emotions in response to both organizational stressors and interpersonal…

Abstract

Research in industrial and organizational psychology demonstrates that the regulation of negative emotions in response to both organizational stressors and interpersonal workplace interactions can result in functional and dysfunctional outcomes (Côté, 2005; Diefendorff, Richard, & Yang, 2008). Research on the regulation of negative emotions has additionally been conducted in social psychology, developmental psychology, neuropsychology, health psychology, and clinical psychology. A close reading of this broader literature, however, reveals that the conceptualization and use of the term “emotion regulation” varies within each research field as well as across these fields. The main focus of our chapter is to make sense of the term “emotion regulation” in the workplace by considering its use across a broad range of psychology disciplines. We then develop an overarching theoretical framework using disambiguating terminology to highlight what we argue are the important constructs involved in the process of intrapersonal emotion generation, emotional experience regulation, and emotional expression regulation in the workplace (e.g., emotional intelligence, emotion regulation strategies, emotion expression displays). We anticipate this chapter will enable researchers and industrial and organizational psychologists to identify the conditions under which functional regulation outcomes are more likely to occur and then build interventions around these findings.

Details

The Role of Individual Differences in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-711-7

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Article

John Thompson and John Forge

Last month, John Thompson and John Forge examined some of the oft‐quoted shortcomings of British management and concluded that too much senior executive time was devoted…

Abstract

Last month, John Thompson and John Forge examined some of the oft‐quoted shortcomings of British management and concluded that too much senior executive time was devoted to issues which have traditionally been the responsibility of middle‐managers. Here, they set out to identify further causes of mis‐spent time and the repercussions that are likely to follow if influence and authority are not re‐delineated from shopfloor to boardroom.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 77 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Article

Helen Walker, Lindsay Tulloch, Karen Boa, Gordon Ritchie and John Thompson

A major difficulty identified many years ago in psychiatric care is the shortage of appropriate instruments with which to carry out valid and reliable therapeutic…

Abstract

Purpose

A major difficulty identified many years ago in psychiatric care is the shortage of appropriate instruments with which to carry out valid and reliable therapeutic assessments which are behaviourally based and therefore appropriate for use in a variety of contexts. The aim of this project was to ascertain the utility of a forensic nursing risk assessment tool - Behavioural Status Index (BEST-Index). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-site cross-sectional survey was undertaken using mixed method design. Quantitative data was generated using BEST-Index to allow comparisons across three different levels of security (high, medium and low) in Scotland and Ireland. Qualitative data were gathered from patients and multi-disciplinary team (MDT) members using semi-structured interviews and questionnaire.

Findings

Measured over an 18-month period, there was a statistically significant improvement in behaviour, when comparing patients in high and medium secure hospitals. Two key themes emerged from patient and staff perspectives: “acceptance of the process” and “production and delivery of information”, respectively. The wider MDT acknowledge the value of nursing risk assessment, but require adequate information to enable them to interpret findings. Collaborating with patients to undertake risk assessments can enhance future care planning.

Research limitations/implications

Studies using cross-section can only provide information at fixed points in time.

Practical implications

The BEST-Index assessment tool is well established in clinical practice and has demonstrated good utility.

Originality/value

This project has served to highlight the unique contribution of BEST-Index to both staff and patients alike and confirm its robustness and versatility across differing levels of security in Scottish and Irish forensic mental health services.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article

Jonathan Matthew Scott, Kathryn Pavlovich, John L. Thompson and Andy Penaluna

Little is known about how experiential entrepreneurship education approaches contribute toward enhancing the engagement of students in the learning process. Using a…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about how experiential entrepreneurship education approaches contribute toward enhancing the engagement of students in the learning process. Using a purposive and convenience sample of individual student reflective journals, the purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate how the process of constructive misalignment enhances the level of student engagement through a team-based experiential entrepreneurship education assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from a purposive and convenience sample of reflective journals, an individual “performance assessment” element of three Masters-level courses (courses 1, 2 and 3) that included an “active” group business ideas generation presentation and a report. These texts were analyzed through content analysis that critically evaluates and summarizes the content of data and their messages.

Findings

While expected learning outcomes included teamwork and communication, the higher levels of active learning and student engagement related to innovation and generating a business idea was much more modest. Rather, the study finds that significant learning opportunities were apparent when students experienced unexpected aspects of constructive misalignment, such as linguistic–cultural challenges, nonparticipation and freeriding.

Originality/value

Building on Biggs’ (2003) model of constructive alignment in course design and delivery/assessment, this paper elucidates various unexpected and surprising aspects. It suggests that constructive misalignment could provide major learning opportunities for students and is thus more likely in these team contexts where entrepreneurship students experience constructive misalignment. Educators should, therefore, continue to design experiential entrepreneurship courses and their performance assessments through team-based approaches that achieve higher levels of engagement as well as more active learning.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

John Thompson and Bob Doherty

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the diverse world of social enterprise.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the diverse world of social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper profiles 11 different social enterprises from around the world. These range from a profit‐achieving business in a very competitive industry, but one with strong social principles, through a profitable workers' co‐operative to ones needing to find financial sustainability if they are to continue their social aspirations. The paper discusses a number of key issues in defining an organisation as a social enterprise and highlights the central issue of measuring success and impact.

Findings

In some of the enterprises the important contribution of a pivotal social entrepreneur is apparent. The need to create and add value for customers and clients is always apparent, as is the need to find effective routes to market. It can be concluded that whilst certain beliefs and principles are routinely evident, social enterprises most certainly cannot be described as “one‐size‐fits‐all”.

Originality/value

The paper presents a collection of social enterprise stories.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 33 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article

John L. Thompson

Reinforces the need for organisations to seek appropriate measures of corporate and competitive performance. Develops a cause‐manifestations‐outcomes model to embrace the…

Abstract

Reinforces the need for organisations to seek appropriate measures of corporate and competitive performance. Develops a cause‐manifestations‐outcomes model to embrace the relevant issues and possible measures. Discusses the relative value of various financial, stakeholder, admiration, reputation and corporate logic approaches. Concludes with a holistic framework from which organisations can select an appropriate and comprehensive set of measures.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

John Meehan, Karon Meehan and Adam Richards

To develop a model that bridges the gap between CSR definitions and strategy and offers guidance to managers on how to connect socially committed organisations with the…

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a model that bridges the gap between CSR definitions and strategy and offers guidance to managers on how to connect socially committed organisations with the growing numbers of ethically aware consumers to simultaneously achieve economic and social objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a critical evaluation of the theoretical foundations of corporate responsibility (CR) and proposes a new strategic approach to CR, which seeks to overcome the limitations of normative definitions. To address this perceived issue, the authors propose a new processual model of CR, which they refer to as the 3C‐SR model.

Findings

The 3C‐SR model can offer practical guidelines to managers on how to connect with the growing numbers of ethically aware consumers to simultaneously achieve economic and social objectives. It is argued that many of the redefinitions of CR for a contemporary audience are normative exhortations (“calls to arms”) that fail to provide managers with the conceptual resources to move from “ought” to “how”.

Originality/value

The 3C‐SR model offers a novel approach to CR in so far as it addresses strategy, operations and markets in a single framework.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 33 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article

John D. Thompson

As an American participant in ‘Management and Financing of Hospital Services’, the DRG Convention held in London on llth‐13th December, 1986, I had looked forward to the…

Abstract

As an American participant in ‘Management and Financing of Hospital Services’, the DRG Convention held in London on llth‐13th December, 1986, I had looked forward to the presentations with a great deal of happy anticipation. That may seem a strange attitude unless one recognises that the life of a ‘DRG expert’ in the USA today is not necessarily a happy one. Like it or not, we are viewed as policemen. Much of the continuous, carping and often self‐serving criticism levelled against us can be described as woeful pleas from a band of corsairs; not very bloodthirsty ones mind you, but rapacious nonetheless.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

John L. Thompson

Discusses the terms entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, emphasises the economic and social importance of entrepreneurs and summarises key research findings to produce a…

Abstract

Discusses the terms entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, emphasises the economic and social importance of entrepreneurs and summarises key research findings to produce a model of outcomes and capital created by entrepreneurs. Shows how entrepreneurs can be found in many walks of life, not just business, and explains that they are responsible for creating social and artistic capital as well as financial wealth. Concludes with reflections on the challenges faced, in part by educationalists, in trying to develop both more entrepreneurs and more enterprise in organisations.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Two articles in this issue concern the thorny question of legal controls over industry — namely those involving employee welfare and protection. First, David Harvey…

Abstract

Two articles in this issue concern the thorny question of legal controls over industry — namely those involving employee welfare and protection. First, David Harvey reports that management disgruntlement over the rising tide of legislation is by no means confined to Britain.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 77 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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