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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

John T. McCormick and Nancy Paterson

This paper explores the threat that transnational political corruption poses to both the world's development banking and commercial banking sectors.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the threat that transnational political corruption poses to both the world's development banking and commercial banking sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper was written from the perspective of someone who has served as a financial fraud prosecutor, an investigator for the World Bank, and currently as a banking supervisor and regulator. The paper uses three case studies to demonstrate how corrupt actors, using various fraudulent and corrupt schemes, steal funds from development banks, and then launder the illicit proceeds from these schemes into legitimate commercial banking systems around the world.

Findings

The paper describes the reputational and financial risks posed to the commercial and development banking sectors from transnational political corruption, and predicts that these risks will grow as more signatory nations to various anti‐corruption treaties and conventions criminalize the bribery of foreign public officials.

Research limitations/implications

Left unchecked, both commercial and development banks face growing political, legal, and economic risks from political corruption.

Practical implications

Drawing on the lessons learned from the case studies analyzed in the paper, the author offers a number of practical recommendations aimed at reducing the threat posed to commercial and development banks from public corruption.

Originality/value

The paper establishes a common threat posed by transnational political corruption to both the commercial and development banking sectors.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Steve Berkman, Nancy Z. Boswell, Franz H. Brüner, Mark Gough, John T. McCormick, Peter Egens Pedersen, Jose Ugaz and Stephen Zimmermann

The purpose of this paper is to offer anti‐corruption experts' personal assessments of the progress international organizations have made in fighting corruption.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer anti‐corruption experts' personal assessments of the progress international organizations have made in fighting corruption.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper contains a survey of the viewpoints of a number of anti‐corruption experts who themselves are current or former staff of international organizations, or who – from their positions within the private sector or in non‐governmental organizations – are able to offer a unique and distanced perspective on the key corruption‐related issues and challenges facing international organizations today.

Findings

It is agreed that international organizations today are at a cross‐roads in their individual and collective fight against corruption. International organizations must weather the corruption scandals that have recently plagued several organizations, and must confront the question of whether their staffs, boards, and member governments indeed have the ability, will, and commitment to fight corruption. To address these challenges, international organizations must adopt proactive investigative strategies when combating corruption, seek greater cooperation with each other, and must ensure that their respective investigation units have the necessary resources and independence to effectively detect, investigate, and prevent corruption.

Originality/value

The paper offers a realistic prognosis on the future of the anti‐corruption movement within and among international organizations.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2017

John W. Saye, Jada Kohlmeier, James B. Howell, Theresa M. McCormick, Robert C. Jones and Thomas A. Brush

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of scaffolded lesson study on the content knowledge, conceptions of curriculum, and classroom practice of 22…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of scaffolded lesson study on the content knowledge, conceptions of curriculum, and classroom practice of 22 elementary and secondary history teachers in four school districts.

Design/methodology/approach

Teachers, teacher educators, and historians collaborated to design and test research lessons grounded in a theory-based framework for problem-based historical inquiry (PBHI) practice. The authors sought to support consonance between the reform ideas of the formal, professional development, curriculum, and the curriculum as enacted in participants’ classrooms.

Findings

Project participation was associated with significant gains in content knowledge and the conceptualization and implementation of more challenging instruction consistent with the PBHI model and the standards of authentic intellectual work (AIW). Mean AIW instruction scores for research lessons were more than double the scores for participants’ non-lesson study lessons and indicated noteworthy progress in integrating the formal and enacted curricula. Evidence suggested that many teachers developed more nuanced understandings of historical phenomena, gained greater appreciation for the importance of authentic purpose in motivating student engagement in challenging learning, and began to reconsider what is required to facilitate complex learning and to refine their repertoire of learning strategies.

Originality/value

Evidence from the first year of this project offers hope for the potential of collaborative communities of practice to facilitate a shared professional knowledge base of wise practice that brings the formal, intended, and enacted curriculum into greater alignment. These results also emphasize the evolutionary process of conceptual change.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

James Rettig

It all began a very long time ago, sometime before 1876, that annus mirabilis of librarianship during which the American Library Association was founded, Library Journal

Abstract

It all began a very long time ago, sometime before 1876, that annus mirabilis of librarianship during which the American Library Association was founded, Library Journal debuted, and Samuel Green published in its pages the first article about reference librarianship. And it continues today. In April 1994, an unidentified library school student from the State University of New York at Buffalo queried the participants of the LIBREFL listserv, asking them, “Can you give a summary of the ‘hot’ library reference issues of the week? I'm working on a project for my Reference course, and would like to find out what is REALLY vital to refernce (sic) librarians out there today.” I was tempted to reply that all of that week's “hot” issues were identified in Green's 1876 article. In that article describing the phenomenon we today call reference service, Green touched on issues such as the librarian's obligation to provide information without injecting personal values, the inability of any librarian to know everything, the need sometimes to refer a patron to another information agency, SDI services, the value of proactive rather than passive service, the challenges of the reference interview, and, of course, what has come to be called the “information versus instruction debate.”

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1920

In an able article upon Sir WILLIAM MCCORMICK's Report on five years' work of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research. The Daily Telegraph observes that “five…

Abstract

In an able article upon Sir WILLIAM MCCORMICK's Report on five years' work of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research. The Daily Telegraph observes that “five years ago, when a twelvemonth of the war had compelled us to realise that winning it would be the hardest task ever laid upon the nation, a beginning was made with organised encouragement and assistance of research by the State. It had long been realised only too well by scientific workers that Great Britain was singular among the leading civilised countries in its obstinate neglect of this vital interest of a modern State; and the course of the war very rapidly brought all of us, and not only the savants, to a recognition of the fact that our principal enemy was foremost of all the Powers in the care which it had given to that interest. The army of technical experts mobilised by Germany for the scientific war was far larger and better equipped than our own. In setting‐out to remedy this state of things, the Government was looking, necessarily, far ahead of the war, which was likely to be ended one way or another long before the benefits of a Department of Scientific and Industrial Research could begin to materialise. Now, five years after the inception of the scheme by the Committee of the Privy Council, it is beginning to bear fruit; but the real harvest is in the not immediate future still. Sir WILLIAM MCCORMICK'S Report, however, as summarised yesterday in our columns, shows in its review of those five years’ work how well the foundations have been laid, and how excellent are the prospects of useful development along the lines now clearly marked out for the activity of the Department. Backwardness in the application of scientific research to industry has cost us dear in many ways. It is a reproach which is now in a fair way to be lifted from us altogether, thanks to that general awakening of the national intelligence of which the new Department was only one result; for its work would be of little avail without the active co‐operation of the industrial world. That is, as the Report brings clearly out, being given; and it will be given in increasing measure as time reveals the inestimable value of what can be done by combined enterprise, directed and fostered by the State. This is only one branch of the Department's work; but it is in this connection, perhaps, that the practical utility of it will be most generally appreciated. Eighteen associations of industrial firms have now been established, each association undertaking co‐operative scientific investigation of the problems of its particular industry; five more are about to be set up and to receive their licenses from the Board of Trade. Ten of the associations are actually at work, and the 2,300 firms organised in them have raised, in the first year, an aggregate income of nearly £40,000 to add to the contribution made by the Department out of the million fund granted by Parliament for the encouragement of such associations. That this expenditure on co‐operative research will be returned many limes over is not open to doubt; the value of it is written on every page of the history of Germany's colossal industrial development in the decades before the war, and it is, indeed, in great part the explanation of that development.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 22 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 12 no. 4/5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

John De Nobile, John McCormick and Katherine Hoekman

– This paper reports two related studies of relationships between organizational communication and occupational stress of staff members in Catholic primary schools.

1983

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports two related studies of relationships between organizational communication and occupational stress of staff members in Catholic primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from both studies were obtained using survey questionnaires. Participants were staff members of Catholic diocesan primary schools in New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory and Queensland, Australia. Research hypotheses were tested using correlation and multiple regression analyses.

Findings

Ten organizational communication factors and four occupational stress domains were identified. Several organizational communication variables were found to be predictors of occupational stress in four identified domains.

Practical implications

The findings provide implications for school administrators in relation to staff member access to formal communication channels, openness and approachability of principals, and support giving between school administration and staff, as well as among staff.

Originality/value

The studies used a conceptual framework of organizational communication that is unique and comprehensive. The paper contributes new knowledge in an area that has received little attention, namely, communication in schools.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

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