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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1967

Before this great innovation assaults the long‐suffering British public in mind and matter, in the retailer's cash register and the spender's pocket, a brief comparison…

Abstract

Before this great innovation assaults the long‐suffering British public in mind and matter, in the retailer's cash register and the spender's pocket, a brief comparison between the present coinage and the promised decimal one might not be amiss. The £sd system has its faults and understandably is difficult for the foreigner, but no more so than the language and the weather. Like many things British it is so haphazard: why should there be 240 pennies to the pound? Why 12 pennies to the shilling? One thing, however, about this awkward currency is that it is amazingly well‐adapted to price variations at the lower level, and most commodities are in this range. Whether prices have adapted themselves to the flexibility of the coinage or the other way round is immaterial but the centuries have well and truly married the two. As a lowly coin such as the farthing has ceased to have commercial use with the falling value of money, it has disappeared and its place has been taken by the next larger, the halfpenny and then by the penny, and this must surely be the one great advantage of the £sd system.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 69 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Frances Devlin, Lea Currie and John Stratton

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether librarians at the University of Kansas are providing instruction through chat in order to develop best practices for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether librarians at the University of Kansas are providing instruction through chat in order to develop best practices for training purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed a sample of chat transcripts using the “ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education” to determine whether librarians were utilizing opportunities for instruction in the chat medium. Using this analysis, they selected the best examples of instructional techniques.

Findings

Students were open to receiving instruction through chat. Librarians who were most successful in providing assistance to students demonstrated persistency and approachability in their interactions.

Practical implications

The authors developed a list of top ten practices for instruction through chat which can be used for training purposes.

Originality/value

Librarians need to continue to develop instructional techniques to create more opportunities for teaching moments in chat. The paper raises awareness of the impact of librarians' demeanor in the online environment.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2017

Carl J. Couch

Abstract

Details

Carl J. Couch and The Iowa School
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-166-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Carl J. Couch and The Iowa School
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-166-9

Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2015

Katie James and Jody Clay-Warner

Research has not yet examined how paid labor performed at nontraditional hours may factor into women’s perceptions of the fairness of the division of household labor. Here…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has not yet examined how paid labor performed at nontraditional hours may factor into women’s perceptions of the fairness of the division of household labor. Here we specifically examine how being employed during nonstandard hours alters the relationship between the division of household labor and wives’ perceptions of the fairness of this division of labor.

Methodology/approach

We analyze data from the National Survey of Families and Households using multinomial logistic regression.

Findings

We find that over-work in household labor has a weaker effect on perceptions of unfairness for wives who work nonstandard hours than for wives who work standard hours. This interaction effect, however, is partially mediated by husbands’ time in feminine-type chores.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design does not allow us to draw causal conclusions. Future research would benefit by considering how movement in and out and nonstandard work affects perceptions of fairness of household labor.

Originality/value of the chapter

Our findings suggest that one way that the gender revolution has stalled is through women’s participation in the service economy since this participation is positively associated with their husbands’ hours in routine chores, which women particularly value. Thus, women may continue to perceive fairness in the home, despite objective inequality, because their husbands are spending more time in feminine-type chores, as necessitated by women’s participation in work at nonstandard times.

Details

Work and Family in the New Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-630-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Robert Prus

Although the particular policies that groups establish may serve to differentiate those groups from others in the broader community, policies are better envisioned as…

1470

Abstract

Although the particular policies that groups establish may serve to differentiate those groups from others in the broader community, policies are better envisioned as aspects of group life in the making than as structures or rules that define the character or operations of the groups under consideration. Addressing instances of policy as humanly engaged ventures, this statement attempts to demystify policy by (a) examining organizational directives in process terms, (b) explicitly incorporating people into the study of the policy‐making process. This paper also addresses policy in ways that (c) are more amenable to ethnographic research on actual instances of policy and (d) contribute to a sustained, comparative analysis of “policy in the making”.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Daniel Diermeier and Shobita Parthasarathy

Describes Myriad Genetics and its struggle to develop a genetic testing service while facing challenges from competitors and activist organizations. After Myriad's…

Abstract

Describes Myriad Genetics and its struggle to develop a genetic testing service while facing challenges from competitors and activist organizations. After Myriad's discovery of the BRCA gene, capable of genetic testing for breast cancer in women, Myriad needed to choose a strategy to provide this service to the public. With several major competitors offering similar services, intense media scrutiny, and a charged activist and political climate, a poor Myriad decision could have major repercussions.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Kenneth M. Eades, Martson Gould and Jennifer Hill

The student's task is to develop a comprehensive strategy for Briggs & Stratton, which is facing severe competition and margin pressures. A major component of the strategy…

Abstract

The student's task is to develop a comprehensive strategy for Briggs & Stratton, which is facing severe competition and margin pressures. A major component of the strategy to be considered is whether to implement economic value added (EVA) as a new performance measurement for management. The case is designed to serve as an introduction to how to compute and use EVA. It emphasizes the importance of performance evaluation as part of a larger strategic plan. A teaching note is available to registered faculty, as well as two video supplements to enhance student learning.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2008

Carolyn Webster-Stratton and M. Reid

Young children who are referred to mental health agencies because of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct problems (CP) frequently have comorbid diagnoses or…

Abstract

Young children who are referred to mental health agencies because of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct problems (CP) frequently have comorbid diagnoses or symptoms such as attention deficit disorder (ADD) with or without hyperactivity (ADHD), language/learning and developmental, or autism spectrum disorders. Research has shown that the Incredible Years Child Dinosaur programme offered to children with comorbid issues is successful at reducing behaviour problems and increasing social and emotional competence. This article examines ways in which this small group therapy programme is tailored to address the individual goals of each child so that the intervention is developmentally and therapeutically appropriate. It discusses group composition, as well as the importance of specific content and teaching methods for children with ADHD, academic and language delays and mild autism.

Corrigendum:

It has been brought to Emerald’s attention that the article “Adapting the Incredible Years child dinosaur social, emotional, and problem-solving intervention to address comorbid diagnoses” by Webster-Stratton, Carolyn and Reid, M. Jamila published in the Journal of Children’s Services, Vol. 3 No. 3, 2008, failed to disclose conflict of interests prior to publication. Author Carolyn Webster-Stratton disseminates the Incredible Years treatment and stands to gain from favourable reports. Because of this, she has voluntarily agreed to distance herself from certain critical research activities, including recruitment, consenting, primary data handling and data analyses. The authors apologise for not disclosing the information prior to publication. The University of Washington has approved these arrangements.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2008

Judy Hutchings, Tracey Bywater, Catrin Eames and Pam Martin

This article reports on three pragmatic randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to help children at risk of conduct disorder (CD): two involved the Incredible Years (IY) BASIC…

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Abstract

This article reports on three pragmatic randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to help children at risk of conduct disorder (CD): two involved the Incredible Years (IY) BASIC parent programme and the other concerned the IY teacher programme. All three interventions took place in regular service settings in North‐ and Mid‐Wales. In all three studies, staff from the provider agency delivered the programme and participated in RCT evaluations in which participants were randomly allocated to intervention or waitinglist control conditions. After a brief introduction to research into the prevention or treatment of CD, and the issues to be considered by services in selecting and delivering interventions, this article summarises the structure, content and evidence base of the IY programmes. The three Welsh studies are briefly described before exploring what factors contributed to service participation in the trials and the benefits and lessons learned in undertaking them.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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