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Article

John Sliter

Technologically, the Canadian securities industry has become extremely complex and this has presented a serious challenge to law enforcement agencies. The industry…

Abstract

Technologically, the Canadian securities industry has become extremely complex and this has presented a serious challenge to law enforcement agencies. The industry continues to make large investments in systems technology and electronic equipment in order to participate in an increasingly fast paced and global system. In addition, Canadian investment firms have been taken over by large banks which has done a great deal to further strengthen their global position. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) has come to the realisation that an effective enforcement strategy would have equally to invest in technology and to be prepared to undertake investigations of increased international dimension.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

John Sliter, Carl‐Denis Bouchard and Guy Bellemare

Examines how the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) successfully implemented a tailor‐made Human Resources (HR) management regime with fresh definitions of competences…

Abstract

Examines how the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) successfully implemented a tailor‐made Human Resources (HR) management regime with fresh definitions of competences for the new Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMETs). Explains that the intention was to increase competences for investigation of white‐collar crime in the wake of corporate scandals in the USA, and thus to restore investor confidence in Canada’s capital market. Details the IMET pilot project, including selection of personnel from the RCMP for the six IMETs. Concludes that the new HR regime clearly has the ability to change how people are managed in the investigation field.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

John Sliter

Focuses on the need to exploit modern technology to fight crime, remembering that information is only data until it is shared ‐ and it needs to be shared quickly and…

Abstract

Focuses on the need to exploit modern technology to fight crime, remembering that information is only data until it is shared ‐ and it needs to be shared quickly and globally. Describes the RECOL initiative of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; its objective is to give citizens a single entry point, via the Internet, to lodge a complaint about any fraud and have it directed efficiently to the appropriate agency, wherever that may be, for actioning. Speculates that this could be the model for the future if separate police forces can be made to talk to each other, and refers to the G8 stewardship of the RECOL project; all crime could be reported this way, using digital photography and facial recognition software. Allows that there are privacy concerns, however, especially in regard to recognition software.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

John Sliter

Based on a presentation at the 24th International Symposium on Economic Crime September, 2006, at the University of Cambridge, this paper aims to focus comment on the risk…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a presentation at the 24th International Symposium on Economic Crime September, 2006, at the University of Cambridge, this paper aims to focus comment on the risk to business generated from organized and economically motivated criminal enterprises to that of risk to reputation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is the considered views of someone who has over 28 years of experience with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police with over 20 of those years conducting white collar crime investigations and/or managing teams of investigators.

Findings

Law enforcement officers around the globe are being pushed to deliver and, with an increase in public resources, are pursuing corporate criminals with renewed enthusiasm. Shareholders have started choosing their investments based on social responsibility and ethical leadership. Western countries are experiencing the end of the baby boom and employees will soon be in big demand and able to pick where they want to work, thereby reasonably expecting to choose only the most socially responsible companies. This will not include those companies involved in corporate crime! It is asserted that the future does indeed look tougher for those employees, executives or companies who may get involved in corporate crime.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the risks to business presented by organized and economically motivated criminal enterprises.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

John Sliter

To provide a viewpoint and a stronger awareness of the increased involvement of criminal activities in the capital markets through organized crime and the need for…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a viewpoint and a stronger awareness of the increased involvement of criminal activities in the capital markets through organized crime and the need for integrated policing.

Design/methodology/approach

The writer has over 25 years of experience with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police with over 15 of those years conducting white collar crime investigations and/or managing teams of investigators.

Findings

Canada is having good success in using the concepts of integrated policing in the implementation of our Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMETs) to detect, investigate and prevent capital markets crime.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the need for integrated policing in order to facilitate and foster close working relationships with key stakeholders in the various levels of regulatory enforcement and disciplinary agencies in order to target those who commit some of the larger organized financial crimes.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

Benny S. Tabalujan

In recent times, there has been some disquiet within certain sectors of the Singapore business community over the role of auditors in detecting corporate fraud. The cause…

Abstract

In recent times, there has been some disquiet within certain sectors of the Singapore business community over the role of auditors in detecting corporate fraud. The cause of this concern can perhaps be attributed partly to the Barings collapse in February 1995 and the subsequent suggestions that the auditors of the Barings subsidiary in Singapore, Barings Futures Singapore Pte Ltd (BFS), may have been negligent in their audit work. More recently, in mid‐1996, a substantial locally listed company, Amcol Holdings Ltd (Amcol), was placed under judicial management amid rumours alleging possible misdeeds by senior executives and directors. The Amcol saga has, once again, focused some attention on the role of auditors and their duty to detect fraud in company accounts.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

Bao Cheng, Gongxing Guo, Jian Tian and Ahmed Shaalan

Using equity theory, this study aims to examine the role of customer incivility in effecting service sabotage among hotel employees by recognizing the mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

Using equity theory, this study aims to examine the role of customer incivility in effecting service sabotage among hotel employees by recognizing the mediating role of revenge motivation and the moderating effect of emotion regulation.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-wave, multi-source questionnaire survey was conducted with 291 employee–supervisor dyads at chain hotels in Shenzhen, China. Previously developed and validated measures for customer incivility, revenge motivation, emotion regulation and service sabotage were adopted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Customer incivility increased employees’ revenge motivation and service sabotage. Emotion regulation acted as a boundary condition for customer incivility’s direct effect on revenge motivation and its indirect effect on service sabotage through revenge motivation. Cognitive reappraisal mitigated the detrimental influence of customer incivility, whereas expressive suppression worsened its adverse effects.

Practical implications

Managers should monitor and deter the emergence of uncivil behaviors, provide psychological support for employees experiencing customer incivility and encourage these employees to use cognitive reappraisal rather than expressive suppression as an emotion regulation strategy.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, no prior research has investigated the customer incivility–service sabotage relationship in the hotel industry. This study sheds light on how customer incivility can motivate service sabotage among hotel employees. Furthermore, the authors used equity theory rather than the commonly adopted resources perspective to offer new insights into the customer incivility–service sabotage relationship.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Hana Medler-Liraz

Although studies have emphasized the need to explore the negative consequences of customer incivility, scant attention has been paid to positive factors that can mitigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Although studies have emphasized the need to explore the negative consequences of customer incivility, scant attention has been paid to positive factors that can mitigate its negative effects on employees’ service performance. The purpose of this study is to extend research on customer incivility and its association with rapport and tipping through the prism of conservation of resources theory. It also examines the role of agreeableness as a personal resource in coping with instances of incivility.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 502 Israeli restaurant servers took part in this study.

Findings

Agreeableness significantly moderated the relationship between customer incivility and rapport: agreeable hospitality employees who served customers manifesting low/medium incivility reported better rapport than disagreeable hospitality employees. However, this effect was not significant for high incivility. Further, agreeable hospitality employees who served customers with low/medium incivility reported higher tips than disagreeable hospitality employees. Surprisingly, the findings also suggested that when employees served customers exhibiting high incivility, the tips were lower for servers high on agreeableness than for servers low on agreeableness.

Originality/value

This study broadens the frontiers of research on customer incivility and provides insights into the critical financial and emotional costs hospitality employees and service organizations incur when encountering incivility. The findings also contribute to the scant research on the potential moderators that may enable employees to handle customer interactions more constructively in the case of incivility within the hospitality industry. Agreeableness appeared to alleviate the negative effects of customer incivility on rapport and tipping but only seemed to be an effective resource up to a certain level of customer incivility.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part

Shani Pindek and Paul E. Spector

Contextual factors play a vital role in employee mistreatment. This chapter deals with the definition and scope of contextual factors, including a distinction between the…

Abstract

Contextual factors play a vital role in employee mistreatment. This chapter deals with the definition and scope of contextual factors, including a distinction between the objective environment and its idiosyncratic perception by employees. Several mechanisms are offered to explain the effects of context on mistreatment, including the stressor–strain framework, interaction with personal characteristics, and also mistreatment acting as a stressor. The framework suggested in this chapter uses levels of analysis, and proposes that the objective environment (group level variables) is perceived at the individual level, which consequently leads to both perpetrated and received mistreatment. Those same objective environment variables also have a direct effect on mistreatment, as well as a moderating role in the relationship between individually perceived context and mistreatment. Furthermore, there is some evidence that mistreatment acts as a contextual variable in and of itself, with perpetrators, victims, and bystanders perceiving mistreatment in their workplace and reporting higher levels of stressors and strains. Finally, we outline the need for more longitudinal, multi-level studies to clearly discern the role of context in employee mistreatment.

Details

Mistreatment in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-117-0

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Book part

Arieh Riskin, Peter Bamberger, Amir Erez and Aya Zeiger

Incivility is widespread in the workplace and has been shown to have significant affective and behavioral consequences. However, the authors still have a limited…

Abstract

Incivility is widespread in the workplace and has been shown to have significant affective and behavioral consequences. However, the authors still have a limited understanding as to whether, how and when discrete incivility events impact team performance. Adopting a resource depletion perspective and focusing on the cognitive implications of such events, the authors introduce a multi-level model linking the adverse effects of such events on team members’ working memory – the “workbench” of the cognitive system where most planning, analyses, and management of goals occur – to team effectiveness. The model which the authors develop proposes that that uncivil interpersonal behavior in general, and rudeness – a central manifestation of incivility – in particular, may place a significant drain on individuals’ working memory capacity, affecting team effectiveness via its effects on individual performance and coordination-related team emergent states and action-phase processes. In the context of this model, the authors offer an overarching framework for making sense of disparate findings regarding how, why and when incivility affects performance outcomes at multiple levels. More specifically, the authors use this framework to: (a) suggest how individual-level cognitive impairment and weakened coordinative team processes may mediate these incivility-based effects, and (b) explain how event, context, and individual difference factors moderators may attenuate or exacerbate these cognition-mediated effects.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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