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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Michael F. Schwartz and John S. Quarterman

Explains the necessity for measurement of Internet growth so thatcapacity, commercial potential, etc. may be planned and assessed. Arguesthat this cannot be measured…

Abstract

Explains the necessity for measurement of Internet growth so that capacity, commercial potential, etc. may be planned and assessed. Argues that this cannot be measured merely by packet counts and user registrations. Presents detailed analysis of over 13,000 sites, worldwide. Develops a mathematical model which can be used to predict growth, by individual countries and globally. Offers further topics for future research.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Joe Ryan

Identifies key activities that network users can perform in orderto use the network effectively. Offers recommended reading, frombeginner to expert user status. Explains…

Abstract

Identifies key activities that network users can perform in order to use the network effectively. Offers recommended reading, from beginner to expert user status. Explains some commonly used terms (e.g. Turbo Gopher with Veronica!). Lists useful Internet resources.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Larry Gainor and Erin Foster

Network resources have become widely used by libraries in recent years. More than ever before, librarians are expected to become familiar with such tools as electronic…

Abstract

Network resources have become widely used by libraries in recent years. More than ever before, librarians are expected to become familiar with such tools as electronic mail, file transfer protocol (ftp), and Internet‐accessible online catalogs. Many online professionals consider Usenet to be the world's largest computer network and an essential resource to academics, yet it has received little attention from the library community. This article will provide a brief description of Usenet and discuss how it may be applied to library settings.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Michel Bauwens

‘If you're not on the net, you're not in the know’, stated The Economist in its 1992 year‐end review of conspiracies and networks. While it is true that the Internet is a…

Abstract

‘If you're not on the net, you're not in the know’, stated The Economist in its 1992 year‐end review of conspiracies and networks. While it is true that the Internet is a wonderful resource, i.e. an ocean of information waiting to be tapped, and while it is also true that the information is freely available, not everybody has access to it. If you're working for the academic community or some research institution, you probably only need to ask your local system administrator.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 45 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Jeris F. Cassel and Sherry K. Little

A national multi‐gigabit‐per‐second research and education network known as the National Research and Education Network is to be established by 1996, according to the…

Abstract

A national multi‐gigabit‐per‐second research and education network known as the National Research and Education Network is to be established by 1996, according to the High‐Performance Computing Act of 1991 (P.L. 102–194) passed in December 1991. Commonly known as the NREN and referred to as the “information highway,” this electronic network is expected to provide scientific, educational, and economic benefits for the United States and to serve as the basis for an all‐encompassing National Information Infrastructure available to all citizens. The idea of the NREN began in the late 1960s in the Department of Defense and its Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) with the development of ARPANet, the first packet‐switching network. This evolved into the Internet, or Interim NREN, after the National Science Foundation (NSF) linked its national supercomputing centers with the NSFNet. The NSFNet is to be the technological backbone for the NREN, which will continue the networking begun by the Internet. Initially, the NREN is intended to interconnect researchers and resources of research institutions, educational institutions, industry, and government in every state.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Michael J. Kovacs and Diane K. Kovacs

E‐mail based electronic conferences (e‐conferences) and journals (e‐journals) are an increasingly popular means of communication for scholars who have access to the…

Abstract

E‐mail based electronic conferences (e‐conferences) and journals (e‐journals) are an increasingly popular means of communication for scholars who have access to the academic networks BITNET or Internet. This article explains the technology that allows e‐conferences to form and proliferate, presents preliminary research on scholars' use of the networks, and then examines general issues informing and moderating e‐conferences.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Jack Kessler

The French are becoming world leaders in networked information. The keyto this development is the immediate access to the general publicprovided by their national Minitel…

324

Abstract

The French are becoming world leaders in networked information. The key to this development is the immediate access to the general public provided by their national Minitel system. New networked libraries are being built, existing libraries are going online, and the crisis‐ridden French publishing industry is looking to networked information for its salvation. The French approach to networking offers interesting lessons for the Internet, not least because the French approach may ultimately be considered more attractive than the Internet′s for developing networked information in Asia and elsewhere

Details

Internet Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Martin Dillon, Erik Jul, Mark Burge and Carol Hickey

Reports on a project to: first, provide an empirical analysis oftextual information on the Internet; second, to test the suitability ofcataloguing rules and record formats…

Abstract

Reports on a project to: first, provide an empirical analysis of textual information on the Internet; second, to test the suitability of cataloguing rules and record formats governing the creation of machine‐readable cataloguing records; and third, develop recommendations that would assist the efforts of standards bodies and others interested in systematically cataloguing or otherwise describing and providing access to electronic information objects available through remote network access. Provides summary tables regarding the growth of the Internet and its traffic, together with file types. Concludes: first, that machine readable cataloguing records should be created; second, the effectiveness of records created for providing description and access information should be monitored; and third, cataloguing rules and formats should be extended to include interactive network systems and services.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Michael Lougee

Computer conferencing is a form of computer‐mediated communication that facilitates continuing coherent discussions among many persons on multiple, and often complex…

Abstract

Computer conferencing is a form of computer‐mediated communication that facilitates continuing coherent discussions among many persons on multiple, and often complex, topics. This article discusses the use of electronic conferencing, along with the benefits and results, at EDUCOM'89, where it was experimentally applied at a large face‐to‐face conference.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Roy Tennant

The Internet computer network is not yet an intuitive or an easily understood environment in which to work. Therefore, new network users in higher education need basic…

Abstract

The Internet computer network is not yet an intuitive or an easily understood environment in which to work. Therefore, new network users in higher education need basic instruction on what the Internet offers and how it can be utilized. Basic training can include an overview of the major academic networks, how to use the networks, how to discover networked information resources, and where to get more information. A conceptual framework of the various operating systems and programs that they will need to connect to a networked information resource may help users understand which command is appropriate and when it is appropriate. Academic librarians are uniquely qualified to offer this instruction because networked information resources are merely another “format” of information and because librarians are skilled at presenting complex information in a straightforward manner.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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