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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1908

THE catalogue, as a library appliance of importance, has had more attention devoted to it than, perhaps, any other method or factor of librarianship. Its construction…

Abstract

THE catalogue, as a library appliance of importance, has had more attention devoted to it than, perhaps, any other method or factor of librarianship. Its construction, materials, rules for compilation and other aspects have all been considered at great length, and in every conceivable manner, so that little remains for exposition save some points in the policy of the catalogue, and its effects on progress and methods. In the early days of the municipal library movement, when methods were somewhat crude, and hedged round with restrictions of many kinds, the catalogue, even in the primitive form it then assumed, was the only key to the book‐wealth of a library, and as such its value was duly recognized. As time went on, and the vogue of the printed catalogue was consolidated, its importance as an appliance became more and more established, and when the first Newcastle catalogue appeared and received such an unusual amount of journalistic notice, the idea of the printed catalogue as the indispensable library tool was enormously enhanced from that time till quite recently. One undoubted result of this devotion to the catalogue has been to stereotype methods to a great extent, leading in the end to stagnation, and there are places even now where every department of the library is made to revolve round the catalogue. Whether it is altogether wise to subordinate everything in library work to the cult of the catalogue has been questioned by several librarians during the past few years, and it is because there is so much to be said against this policy that the following reflections are submitted.

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New Library World, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Jing Jian Xiao and Chunsheng Tao

The purpose of this literature review paper is to define consumer finance, describe the scope of consumer finance and discuss its future research directions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this literature review paper is to define consumer finance, describe the scope of consumer finance and discuss its future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, consumer finance is used as a synonym of household finance. Consumers refer to individuals and families. After defining the term “consumer finance,” we conducted a critical review of consumer finance as an interdisciplinary research field in terms of money managing, insuring, borrowing and saving/investing. Future research directions are also discussed.

Findings

This paper discusses similarities and differences among several terms such as consumer finance, household finance, personal finance, family finance and behavioral finance. The paper also reviewed key studies on consumer financial behavior around four key financial functions, namely, money management, insurance, loan and saving/investment and several nontraditional topics such as fintech and financial capability/literacy. The paper also introduced several datasets of consumer finance commonly used in the United States and China.

Originality/value

This paper clarified several similar terms related to consumer finance and sorted out the diverse literature of consumer finance in multiple disciplines such as economics, finance and consumer science, which provide a foundation for generating more fruitful research in consumer finance in the future.

Details

China Finance Review International, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1398

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Janice M. Bogstad

Almost all libraries collect fiction. Of course the nature, scope, and organization of the collection varies with the type of library and its clientele. In this column…

Abstract

Almost all libraries collect fiction. Of course the nature, scope, and organization of the collection varies with the type of library and its clientele. In this column scholars, fans, and just plain readers of diverse fiction formats, types, and genres will explore their specialty with a view to the collection building needs of various types of libraries. In addition to lists of “good reads,” authors not to be missed, rising stars, and rediscovered geniuses, columnists will cover major critics, bibliographies, relevant journals and organizations, publishers, and trends. Each column will include a genre overview, a discussion of access to published works, and a core collection of recommended books and authors. Janice M. Bogstad leads off with a discussion of science fiction. In the next issue of Collection Building, Ian will focus her discussion on the growing body of feminist science fiction with an article entitled, “Redressing an Interval Balance: Women and Science Fiction, 1965–1983.” Issues to follow will feature Kathleen Heim on thrillers, and Rhea Rubin reviewing short story collection building. Should you care to suggest an area or aspect of fiction collection building for discussion or try your hand as a columnist contact the column editor through Neal‐Schuman Publishers.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Susan Proctor and John Campbell

Primary care in the NHS changed substantially during the 1990s. In recent years, structural changes, most notably the introduction of primary care groups as an…

Abstract

Primary care in the NHS changed substantially during the 1990s. In recent years, structural changes, most notably the introduction of primary care groups as an administrative centre for planning, have added impetus to the need for adopting meaningful measures of quality of the primary care service. This qualitative study reports the views of a sample of general practitioners, primary care nurses, and practice managers on the development and refinement of current performance indicators. Seven themes were identified as key areas for development of indicators of performance: patient experience, clinical activity, service development and innovation, access, health promotion, cost effectiveness, and quality of life outcomes. These themes are incorporated into a dynamic framework for development where improved outcomes (including quality of life measures) are seen as central to the evaluation of quality, and inter‐professional collaboration in the delivery and evaluation of quality of the new primary care is called for.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

John S. Campbell and James Robinson

The TRIXEL algorithm and theory are presented for colour‐fill contouring. The algorithm is simple, efficient, easily implemented and it readily adapts to parallel…

Abstract

The TRIXEL algorithm and theory are presented for colour‐fill contouring. The algorithm is simple, efficient, easily implemented and it readily adapts to parallel processing. Examples are given and a Fortran 77 source listing is included.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Bruce G. Carruthers

In the past several years, economic sociology has grown into a new speciality within sociology. Numerous edited volumes, survey articles and handbooks herald its arrival…

Abstract

In the past several years, economic sociology has grown into a new speciality within sociology. Numerous edited volumes, survey articles and handbooks herald its arrival and mark out its place in the sociological firmament (see, e.g. Granovetter and Swedberg, 1992; Swedberg, 1991; Smelser and Swedberg, 1994). Although classic social theorists like Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and Georg Simmel frequently pondered the structure and conditions of industrial society and the problems its emergence generated, it was not until neoclassical economists recently began to study nonmarket social phenomena that sociologists reacted by taking up the market as an object of study.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

James C. Robinson, John S. Campbell and Denis Kelliher

An algorithm is presented for the tracking of interior points in a shape evolving unstructured FE mesh. Evolution of the boundary shape may be associated with a governing…

Abstract

An algorithm is presented for the tracking of interior points in a shape evolving unstructured FE mesh. Evolution of the boundary shape may be associated with a governing equation, as in moving boundary problems, or may be prescribed, as in structural shape optimisation. In the latter SSO case the point tracking algorithm may be used in conjunction with a FD approximation to determine geometric sensitivities: in this case the boundary deformation is a small perturbation. For meshes undergoing gross deformations of the boundary an incremental method is used. Reversibility tests are undertaken to assess the robustness and accuracy of the algorithm and examples are given to illustrate the general utility of the method.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Tony Chalcraft

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2015

Bernard Harris, Roderick Floud and Sok Chul Hong

In The Changing Body (Cambridge University Press and NBER, 2011), we presented a series of estimates showing the number of calories available for human consumption in…

Abstract

In The Changing Body (Cambridge University Press and NBER, 2011), we presented a series of estimates showing the number of calories available for human consumption in England and Wales at various points in time between 1700 and 1909/1913. We now seek to correct an error in our original figures and to compare the corrected figures with those published by a range of other authors. We also include new estimates showing the calorific value of meat and grains imported from Ireland. Disagreements with other authors reflect differences over a number of issues, including the amount of land under cultivation, the extraction and wastage rates for cereals and pulses and the number of animals supplying meat and dairy products. We consider recent attempts to achieve a compromise between these estimates and challenge claims that there was a dramatic reduction in either food availability or the average height of birth cohorts in the late-eighteenth century.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-782-6

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2013

Michael A. Katovich

In this chapter I attempt to merge Athens’ conception of domination as a complex interactionist concept with Goffman’s notion of demeanor and deference as lynchpins of…

Abstract

In this chapter I attempt to merge Athens’ conception of domination as a complex interactionist concept with Goffman’s notion of demeanor and deference as lynchpins of dramaturgical analysis. I ground the merger in an analysis of metaphorical duel between a superordinate and subordinate in the TV show Mad Men. The examination of this metaphorical dual also implies a connection between a radical interactionism as defined by Athens and a radical dramaturgy informed by Athens’ conception of domination. In particular, I propose an examination of civil domination within institutionalized settings in which use of shared pasts and concomitant acts of demeanor and deference enhance the construction of domination between superordinates and subordinates. The fictional representation of a metaphorical duel in the television show Mad Men depicts a struggle for control in which the superordinate demands that a willful subordinate sign a contract which will bind the subordinate to a particular place for an extended period of time. The examination of events leading to signing reveals a complex weave of social acts that combines the force of domination with the artistry of demeanor and deference.

Details

Radical Interactionism on the Rise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-785-6

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