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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

David C. Bell, John S. Atkinson and Victoria Mosier

Describes how HIV and AIDS are carried and spread, particularly for high‐risk groups, but adds that it is not only behavioural but also those behaviours in conjunction…

Abstract

Describes how HIV and AIDS are carried and spread, particularly for high‐risk groups, but adds that it is not only behavioural but also those behaviours in conjunction with others. Employs figures and tables for added explanation and emphasis. Chronicles some individual case studies showing different “risk” behaviours and types of “unsafe” practices. Makes clear that the use of varied types of education are of major importance in the fight against ignorance and nonchalance in the battle against AIDS.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Dirk H.R. Spennemann and John S. Atkinson

This paper details a longitudinal study into the e‐mail habits of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research investigating the…

Abstract

This paper details a longitudinal study into the e‐mail habits of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research investigating the factors and barriers that can influence the successfully adoption of technology into the learning environment. The findings from this study illustrate that e‐mail applications are very popular in terms of both useage as well as the high level of confidence that students exhibit. The survey identified two main areas that need to be addressed, namely the disadvantage of rural students in accessing e‐mail and second that male students tend not to be as frequent users of e‐mail compared to their female counterparts.

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Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Dirk H.R. Spennemann and John S. Atkinson

This paper details a longitudinal study into the data management practices of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research…

Abstract

This paper details a longitudinal study into the data management practices of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research investigating the factors and barriers that can influence the successful adoption of technology into the learning environment. The findings suggest that students are exhibiting poor data management skills and lack the understanding to recover from data loss situations.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2021

Sam M. Mwando, Amin Issa and Verinjaerako Kangotue

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perception of university staff and students in implementing flexible working arrangements (FWA) to increase space efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perception of university staff and students in implementing flexible working arrangements (FWA) to increase space efficiency, lower overheads and improve productivity at the Namibia University of Science and Technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected using questionnaires, interviews and document searches. A total of 253 university staff (academic and support) and students were surveyed to solicit their perceptions on the extent to which FWA could be implemented to ensure space optimisation, minimise property related costs and improve employee productivity.

Findings

The study confirms that the successful implementation of FWA needs coordinated institutional policy to effectively support and cater to university staff’s different needs while meeting those of the university. Implementing FWA may reduce demand on utilities resulting in lower overheads for the institution. Based on the findings, the study is inconclusive on whether FWA improves or reduces staff productivity.

Practical implications

In the era of austerity measures in institutions of higher education (IHE), with rapid advances in communication information technologies, FWA are not only a possibility but inevitable to ensure optimal use of space, lower operating costs and improved work productivity. This study provides a cursory understanding of the possibility to implementing FWA in higher education.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the FWA body of knowledge from the perspective of both academic, non-academic staff and students in IHE.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

John S. Atkinson, Dirk H.R. Spenneman and David Cornforth

To provide administrators at an Australian university with data on the feasibility of redirecting under‐utilised computer laboratories facilities into a distributed high…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide administrators at an Australian university with data on the feasibility of redirecting under‐utilised computer laboratories facilities into a distributed high performance computing facility.

Design/methodology/approach

The individual log‐in records for each computer located in the computer laboratories at the university were investigated. The log‐in data were investigated over a 24‐hour/seven day a week period between June 2001 and August 2003. The data were analysed in terms of student access to the computer facilities during “normal” business hours, weekend times, and the semester breaks.

Findings

The computer laboratories were hugely under‐utilised, with less than 10 per cent of all log‐ins occurring during off peak times (7 pm‐8 am). Similarly, only weekends were likewise under‐utilised. This strongly suggests that this spare computer capacity could be used for alternate means during these times.

Research limitations/implications

Future research needs to determine whether the needs of the general computer laboratory user who requires a stable and secure system can coexist with the users of a high performance computer facility where different software and differently configured computer systems are required.

Practical implications

This research has the potential for universities to utilise more effectively their computer laboratory resources by allocating under‐utilised resources into other projects, such as to a high performance computing facility (HPCF). The cost of these re‐allocated resources would be a fraction of the cost compared to a scenario in which a separate dedicated HPCF had to be provided.

Originality/value

This paper suggests an alternate utilisation of the spare computing laboratory resources available at many universities.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Chris Hendry and Andrew Pettigrew

In the United States in the last few years there has developed a notion of “strategic human resource management” (HRM). As with other high‐sounding phrases in the…

Abstract

In the United States in the last few years there has developed a notion of “strategic human resource management” (HRM). As with other high‐sounding phrases in the management of people, first reactions are likely to divide between “let's have some of it” to “it won't work here”, with the latter possibly predominating. Where American pragmatism inclines towards trying new things to see if they work, British pragmatism tends to mean sticking with the actual and the evidently possible. Nevertheless, reviewing ideas which run ahead of practice can, on occasion, be useful in suggesting new possibilities. This article will review the implications of “strategic HRM” and ask whether it has any relevance to some of the issues which currently exercise personnel managers in the UK — notably, decentralising the personnel function and increasing workforce flexibility.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Richard A. Gray

A history of twentieth‐century censorship. Shakespeare's company staged the first production of The Merchant of Venice sometime between 30 July 1596 and 22 July 1598. From…

Abstract

A history of twentieth‐century censorship. Shakespeare's company staged the first production of The Merchant of Venice sometime between 30 July 1596 and 22 July 1598. From the day of that presentation, it is probable that the play has annoyed, perhaps even offended, many who have seen or read it, the source of the offense being the disparaging portrait of a major character, Shylock. On the stage for many years, there have been radically discrepant interpretations of the Jewish usurer. Since the day of Sir Henry Irving, actors and directors have often chosen to present Shylock in a way that transforms the role from that which Elizabethan playgoers may have seen and heard, or may have thought they had seen and heard, to the complex, ambivalent personality depicted in all productions since Irving first projected Shylock as a tragic hero.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2007

Gordon Dadswell

The article briefly covers the establishment of the Workers’ Educational Association in both England and Australia. The development of the Workers’ Educational Association…

Abstract

The article briefly covers the establishment of the Workers’ Educational Association in both England and Australia. The development of the Workers’ Educational Association of Victoria is discussed in the context of the work of Atkinson. The idealism paradigm as exemplified in the writings of Atkinson is described and the relationship between the paradigm and adult ducation is made explicit. The development of realism is then discussed including the role of Hancock where his conceptualisation of social class is made explicit. Next the reaction by Badger to the concept enunciated by Hancock and applied to adult education is described. The article concludes by discussing the role of Badger in seeking to remove the WEAV as a major provider of adult education in Victoria.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1970

M.R. Denning, Fenton Atkinson and L.J. Megaw

May 6, 1970 Docks — “De‐casualisation scheme” — Timber loaded on lorries after storage in dock area on removal from ship — Piling of timber at importer's yard “in vicinity…

Abstract

May 6, 1970 Docks — “De‐casualisation scheme” — Timber loaded on lorries after storage in dock area on removal from ship — Piling of timber at importer's yard “in vicinity of” Cardiff dock estates — Whether “dock work” — Whether timber still “cargo” — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) Act, 1946 (9 & 10 Geo. VI, c. 22), s. 6 — Docks and Harbours Act, 1966 (c. 28), ss. 51(3), 58 — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) (Amendment) Order, 1967 (S.I. 1967, No. 1252), Sch. 2, cl. 1 (3) proviso, App. 1.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Nirit Weiss-Blatt

Abstract

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The Techlash and Tech Crisis Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-086-0

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