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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

John Rodwell

Whether a reference librarian needs a good subject background to provide a quality service, or can rely upon generic professional skills, is an old debate. However it is…

Abstract

Whether a reference librarian needs a good subject background to provide a quality service, or can rely upon generic professional skills, is an old debate. However it is sharpened once again by the emerging changes in reference services in the digital environment, in particular sophisticated end‐user access to information resources. Already in recent years subject expertise, which is not the same as subject knowledge, has been somewhat overshadowed in the recruitment and training of librarians by requirements for advanced technological and other, for example training, skills. However amongst the wide range of skills and knowledge required by current practice in reference, and especially for the future roles envisaged for librarians, are an understanding of specific client needs and information sources, which constitute the traditional strengths of subject specialists.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Abstract

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

John Rodwell, Rebecca Flower and Defne Demir

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether occupational social contexts differentiate the processing of changes in the employment relationship, as represented by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether occupational social contexts differentiate the processing of changes in the employment relationship, as represented by the psychological contract. Specifically, this study investigates the impact of the psychological contract and justice, with negative affectivity (NA), on medical practitioners or administrative staff in healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

Samples of 54 medical practitioners (30 percent) and 122 administrative staff (59 percent), primarily providing public services, responded to a cross-sectional survey. Data were analyzed using multiple regression analyses.

Findings

Among medical staff, psychological contract obligations were associated with lower commitment and psychological distress, whereas fulfillment was associated with higher commitment and job satisfaction, yet higher distress. Distributive justice was associated with lower distress, and NA was associated with higher distress. Among administration staff, fulfillment was associated with commitment and job satisfaction, and NA was associated with lower job satisfaction and higher distress. Essentially, reforms are likely to have more impact on less powerful occupations.

Practical implications

Psychological contract fulfillment is a key predictor of hospital employees’ commitment and satisfaction, placing clinicians, particularly, under pressure. To retain employees, hospitals must keep their promises. Further, occupational power activates the role of obligations, with practitioners having negative outcomes and holding the organization to account until the obligations are fulfilled.

Originality/value

This study highlights the differential nature of the psychological contract among healthcare employee groups, with differences depending on occupational power.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

John Rodwell and Julia Ellershaw

The purpose of this paper is to explore the currency underlying the employment relationship of allied health workers by investigating the mechanisms of their psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the currency underlying the employment relationship of allied health workers by investigating the mechanisms of their psychological contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

Path analyses were conducted on the survey responses from Australian allied health professionals (n=112; a 46 per cent response rate).

Findings

The analyses revealed that psychological contract promises decreased organizational citizenship behaviours relating to the organization (OCBO), while contract fulfilment increased commitment and reduced psychological distress. Contract breach reduced organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The results indicate that obligations may be the primary currency in their psychological contract, with career commitment forming a set of obligations by which employees determine their OCBO, highlighting the nature of the resources exchanged to be targeted to their perceived source, in this case organizational promises begetting discretionary contributions to the organization. Further, fulfilment may reduce uncertainty, which in turn can reduce strain and increase OCBO.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

John Rodwell, Julia Ellershaw and Rebecca Flower

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of three components of the psychological contract (i.e. obligations, fulfillment and breach) and the individual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of three components of the psychological contract (i.e. obligations, fulfillment and breach) and the individual characteristic negative affectivity (NA) onto three key outcomes, namely, job satisfaction, organizational identification and psychological distress.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were completed by 222 Australian nurses and midwives from a medium-sized metropolitan Australian hospital. The response rate for the study was 39 percent.

Findings

Structural equation modeling revealed that perceptions of psychological contract fulfillment were positively linked to organizational identification and job satisfaction, while psychological contract breach was negatively linked to these outcomes. NA was negatively linked to job satisfaction and positively linked to psychological distress. Psychological contract obligations were not associated with any of the employee outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Psychological contract fulfillment is an important driver of employee satisfaction and organizational identification and the findings highlight the importance of including NA in psychological contract research. The occupation and context, being in-demand employees, appeared to neutralize the impact of one dimension of the psychological contract, employer promises and obligations.

Practical implications

Explicitly managing employees’ psychological contracts by focussing on fulfilling realistic promises will enable managers to improve employee outcomes and facilitate employees embracing their organization.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to explore all three components of the psychological contract. These results may assist in the development of strategies to retain in-demand employees such as nurses, particularly highlighting the need to make and fulfill realistic promises.

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2008

John Rodwell and Linden Fairbairn

Many university libraries are adopting a faculty liaison librarian structure as an integral part of their organization and service delivery model. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Many university libraries are adopting a faculty liaison librarian structure as an integral part of their organization and service delivery model. This paper aims to examine, in a pragmatic way, the variations in the definition of the role of the faculty liaison librarian, the expectations of those librarians, their library managers and their clients and the impact of environmental factors. The faculty liaison librarian role is not entirely new, evolving from the traditional subject librarian and university special/branch library role. However the emerging role is characterized by a more outward‐looking perspective and complexity, emphasizing stronger involvement and partnership with the faculty and direct engagement in the University's teaching and research programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the literature and other sources on the rationale and role of library liaison, the current developments, drivers and expectations are discussed.

Findings

The study finds that dynamic external and internal environments of universities are driving the evolution of library liaison, so the role description is still fluid. However, the breadth and weight of expectations is now such that the effectiveness and sustainability of the role has to be addressed.

Practical implications

While a dynamic, broader and more intensive role for the faculty liaison librarian is emerging, more thinking is needed about the extent of that role and its sustainability. What, for example, are the priorities for the faculty liaison librarian? What traditional activities can, and may, have to be abandoned? These considerations are necessary not only to guide the librarians, but also to help define the attributes and skills required for the position and to determine the institutional support it requires.

Originality/value

This is a contemporary critique of the well‐established, but diverse library service – the faculty liaison librarian structure.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

John J. Rodwell, Andrew J. Noblet and Amanda F. Allisey

The purpose of this paper is to examine the efficacy of the demand‐control‐support model, augmented with employee perceptions of organisational justice and degree of met…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the efficacy of the demand‐control‐support model, augmented with employee perceptions of organisational justice and degree of met expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 128 public sector employees working in a large state police force operating under many of the elements of new public management. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted using four indicators of occupational strain: employee wellbeing, job satisfaction, organisational commitment and intent to quit.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that the demand‐control‐support model has great utility in identifying those aspects of the work environment associated with employee strain. Job control and social support at work in particular were the most consistent predictors. In contrast, the expectation and justice variables failed to make significant contributions to the model in all but one analysis providing no support for the “injustice as stressor” perspective.

Research limitations/implications

Although a cross‐sectional design was utilized, these results highlight the value of applying the parsimonious demand‐control‐support model to a wider set of outcomes, especially in a public sector environment.

Practical implications

The results emphasize the importance of the relatively neglected “softer” work characteristics support and control. In order to combat the ill‐effects of organisational reforms and prompt a shift towards the public value approach, managers operating under elements of new public management should ensure that adequate social support at work is available and that employee control is commensurate with their demands.

Originality/value

This study examined an augmented demand‐control‐support model and identified that whilst perceptions of justice can influence employee attitudes and wellbeing, the demand, control, and support variables remain the most influential factors with regard to public sector employee attitudes and wellbeing.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Andrew Noblet, John Rodwell and John McWilliams

This paper reports on the results of a study aimed at identifying the relative influence of generic and job‐specific stressors experienced by a cohort of Australian…

Abstract

This paper reports on the results of a study aimed at identifying the relative influence of generic and job‐specific stressors experienced by a cohort of Australian managers. The results of a regression analysis revealed that both the generic components of the job strain model (JSM) and job‐specific stressors were predictive of the strain experienced by participants. However, when looking at the total amount of variance that is explained by the predictor variables, the combined influence of job demand, job control and social support contributed 98 per cent of the explained variance in job satisfaction and 90 per cent of the variance in psychological health. The large amount of variance explained by the JSM suggests that this model provides an accurate account of the work characteristics that contribute to the strain experienced by managers and no augmentation is needed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Denise M. Jepsen and John J. Rodwell

This paper aims to widen knowledge of and explore how convergent interviewing can be used to identify key issues within an organization.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to widen knowledge of and explore how convergent interviewing can be used to identify key issues within an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces the convergent interviewing technique and describes the method of selecting the interview subjects. The construction of a round of interviews is explained. The content of the interviews is described and the particular probing nature of the questions demanded by the convergent interview process is explained. The ways to analyze the full set of interviews for groupings or categories is also described. The case study example of a broad research question about influences on work behaviors in a local government council is used to illustrate the convergent interviewing technique.

Findings

The key issues revealed by using the technique can be subsequently used for a variety of research and consulting purposes and settings. Convergent interviewing is an effective research method, which conserves resources.

Originality/value

Convergent interviewing enables researchers to determine the most important and/or key issues within a population rather than a full list of issues in an organization or barriers to change in a particular organizational context.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

John J. Rodwell, Jeremy Lam and Maureen Fastenau

Organisations with low absenteeism and low turnover can be distinguished from organisations with high absenteeism and turnover through the identification and…

Abstract

Organisations with low absenteeism and low turnover can be distinguished from organisations with high absenteeism and turnover through the identification and implementation of sophisticated and strategic best practices such as benchmarking relative cost position, developing a corporate ethic, valuing the negotiation of an enterprise agreement, and not having a written OH&S policy. Several of the remaining 16 practices identified in the literature as best practices, including benchmarking customer service, having a policy addressing recruitment, selection and promotion, were shown to be standard industry practice in the AFI. The findings suggest that benchmarking allows organisations to identify and replicate the innovations of competitors, but competitive advantage requires innovation rather than replication.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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