Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Richard Corgel, John Geron and John Riley

The impact of recent corporate scandals has been serious and far‐reaching. The popular news coverage has been unequalled by any other business issue. The result is that…

1424

Abstract

The impact of recent corporate scandals has been serious and far‐reaching. The popular news coverage has been unequalled by any other business issue. The result is that the investment community has lost its trust in corporate governance and financial reporting systems that less than two years ago were the envy of the world. Shareholders are insisting on changes that include enhancements to corporate governance, adherence to ethical standards and strict accountability. In response, the government, the investment community and the public in general have focused greater scrutiny on the corporate financial reporting function.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1980

Having become increasingly aware of the insufficiency of background data available to executives involved in Personnel Management, and Resourcing, recruitment specialists…

Abstract

Having become increasingly aware of the insufficiency of background data available to executives involved in Personnel Management, and Resourcing, recruitment specialists Riley Advertising decided to take the lead in redressing the balance within this crucial area. Riley decided to commission a research programme from Markintell Limited, which in essence would provide a new service to Personnel Management and give them a valuable databank which will grow in scope as subsequent edition of Markintell's reports are published.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 80 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1946

The recent debate in the House of Lords showed that the official plans for milk of better quality, set out in the White Paper three years ago, are only slowly being put…

Abstract

The recent debate in the House of Lords showed that the official plans for milk of better quality, set out in the White Paper three years ago, are only slowly being put into effect. A more active policy was, however, promised by Lord Ammon when labour and plant made it possible. Farmers have come to accept the view that a safe milk supply depends both upon the improvement of animal health and on the heat‐treatment of milk. Some recent figures issued in the Monthly Bulletin of the Ministry of Health show what the pasteurisation of milk has already achieved in reducing the number of deaths among young children from abdominal tuberculosis, a form of the disease which is generally due to tubercle bacillus of bovine origin. In 1921, in the administrative county of London, 136 out of every 1,000,000 children died from this disease. In 1944 the corresponding figure was six. In rural areas the rate in 1921 was 252 and in 1944 still sixty, or ten times the London rate. The London figures for 1944 show a reduction to one‐twenty‐third of the 1921 rate, while for rural areas the reduction is only about one‐quarter. These figures suggest a high degree of correspondence between the increase of pasteurisation and the decrease of mortality from abdominal tuberculosis. In 1944 99 per cent. of London milk supplies was pasteurised; and though more milk has been treated in rural areas and in urban areas outside London during the past twenty years, nothing like the London standard has yet been generally reached. Large towns such as London are at one disadvantage in regard to milk safety in that they receive their supplies in bulk, and samples, before pasteurisation, show a high degree of infection. To this extent rural areas might be expected to have better figures. That they do not would appear to be proof of the greater safety provided by pasteurisation. In the House of Lords debate Lord Rothschild estimated the annual casualties from raw milk contaminated by bovine tuberculosis germs as between 7,000 and 8,000. The case for speedier progress with the provision of pasteurisation plant will be generally endorsed. This development under the auspices of the Ministry of Health needs to be supported by a vigorous effort by the Ministry of Agriculture to build up the health of dairy herds. The problems involved in establishing clean areas, beginning with isolated districts and extending them gradually until in ten or fifteen years' time the whole country is clear of tuberculosis and contagious abortion, were recently discussed in these columns. The Milk Marketing Board, the producers' organisation, has now declared its support for a national drive to clean up the dairy herds; and the Government are assured of general support when a comprehensive plan for ensuring safety in milk is put forward.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

25

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

John Crawford and Sarah Riley

This paper considers the assessment and enhancement of student feedback within a University Library context. It examines the assessment of the overall experience of the…

327

Abstract

This paper considers the assessment and enhancement of student feedback within a University Library context. It examines the assessment of the overall experience of the student of the university as a whole and the role that the library plays in that. Lessons can be learned from the article about the role of the information service in supporting the mission of the parent organisation.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1908

In the continuation of the work previously described, experiments were conducted, according to the general plan already described, to determine the effects of benzoic acid…

Abstract

In the continuation of the work previously described, experiments were conducted, according to the general plan already described, to determine the effects of benzoic acid and benzoates upon health and digestion. This investigation is of special importance because of the opinion held by many manufacturers, food officials, and consumers that benzoic acid and benzoates are probably the least harmful of the preservative substances employed. It is believed that for this reason there has been a very large increase in the use of these preservatives in the United States in the last few years, with a corresponding decrease in the amount of other preservative substances employed. It has also been claimed that there can be no reasonable objection to the use of benzoic acid by reason of its natural occurrence in many food products, either in traces or in considerable quantities. Among the products cited the cranberry occupies the most prominent position because of the notable amount of benzoic acid it contains. These considerations, however, had no determining influence on the choice of this substance for the experimental work, inasmuch as it was included in the original scheme which was prepared before the experimental work on preservatives previously reported was begun.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 10 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2018

Khalid Arar and Izhar Oplatka

It is widely accepted that educational leaders and teachers need to manage and regulate their emotions continually, mainly because schooling and teaching processes expose…

Abstract

Purpose

It is widely accepted that educational leaders and teachers need to manage and regulate their emotions continually, mainly because schooling and teaching processes expose many emotions. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to trace the ways Israeli assistant principals, both Arab and Jewish, manage their emotions at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on semi-structured interviews with 15 assistant principals, it was found that they are required to manage their emotions in accordance with entrenched emotion rules in the culture and society.

Findings

Most of the Jewish female APs tend to display warmth and empathy toward teachers in order to better understand their personal needs and professional performances. In contrast, Arab APs suppressed or fabricated emotional expression in their discourse with teachers and parents, in order to maintain a professional façade and retain the internal cohesion of the school. Both groups of APs believed their emotion regulation results in higher level of harmony in the school. Empirical and practical suggestions are put forward.

Originality/value

The paper is original and contributes to the theoretical and practical knowledge.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1922

In order to ensure that only tea which is pure and fit for human food shall pass into the country, all consignments are examined on importation. In the first place this…

Abstract

In order to ensure that only tea which is pure and fit for human food shall pass into the country, all consignments are examined on importation. In the first place this examination is made by tea inspectors trained in the Laboratory and approved by the Treasury under the provisions of the Sale of Food and Drugs Act, 1875.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1903

The final report of the Butter Regulations Committee has now been published and it is earnestly to be hoped that Regulations based on the Committee's Recommendations will…

Abstract

The final report of the Butter Regulations Committee has now been published and it is earnestly to be hoped that Regulations based on the Committee's Recommendations will at once be framed and issued by the Board of Agriculture. It will be remembered that in an Interim Report the Committee recommended the adoption of a limit of 16 per cent. for the proportion of water in butter, and that, acting on this recommendation, the Board of Agriculture drew up and issued the “Sale of Butter Regulations, 1902,” under the powers conferred on the Board by Section 4 of the Food Act of 1899. In the present Report the Committee deal with the other matters referred to them, namely, as to what Regulations, if any, might with advantage be made for determining what deficiency in any of the normal constituents of butter, or what addition of extraneous matter other than water, should raise a presumption until the contrary is proved that the butter is not “genuine.” The Committee are to be congratulated on the result of their labours—labours which have obviously been both arduous and lengthy. The questions which have had to be dealt with are intricate and difficult, and they are, moreover, of a highly technical nature. The Committee have evidently worked with the earnest desire to arrive at conclusions which, when applied, would afford as great a measure of protection—as it is possible to give by means of legislative enactments—to the consumer and to the honest producer. The thorough investigation which has been made could result only in the conclusions at which the Committee have arrived, namely, that, in regard to the administration of the Food Acts, (1) an analytical limit should be imposed which limit should determine what degree of deficiency in those constituents which specially characterise butter should raise a presumption that the butter is not “genuine”; (2) that the use of 10 per cent. of a chemically‐recognisable oil in the manufacture of margarine be made compulsory; (3) that steps should be taken to obtain international co‐operation; and finally, that the System of Control, as explained by various witnesses, commends itself to the Committee.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 5 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

John Riley

Questions the approaches used for evaluating the success of community‐policing in the USA. Finds that reliance on crime and arrest statistics is not adequate. One of the…

Abstract

Questions the approaches used for evaluating the success of community‐policing in the USA. Finds that reliance on crime and arrest statistics is not adequate. One of the new measures “knowledge of organizational personnel”, is examined reporting on the interest in and acceptance of the community‐policing philosophy among police officers working in a pilot programe in Anchorage, Alaska. Findings suggest that police officers took satisfaction in some aspects of the work but were frustrated and uncertain about others. Support for the programme is linked to three issues: desire for professional development, a desire for knowledge of area covered and an interest in creative and proactive problem solving.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000