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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Ammar Abdellatif Sammour, Weifeng Chen and John M.T. Balmer

This paper aims to study the corporate heritage brand traits and corporate heritage brand identity by concentrating on developing key dimensions for the corporate heritage…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the corporate heritage brand traits and corporate heritage brand identity by concentrating on developing key dimensions for the corporate heritage brand dimensions in the retailing industry in the UK. This study advances the corporate brand heritage theory and introduces the theory of corporate heritage brand identity, which is developed from the case study of John Lewis – one of the most respected and oldest retails in the UK established in 1864.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study has adopted a theory-building case study using qualitative data. It uses semi-structured interviews that were organised and managed by John Lewis Heritage Centre in Cookham. A total of 14 participants were involved in this study. We have used Nvivo.11 software to set the main themes and codes for this study framework.

Findings

This study identifies Balmer’s (2013) corporate heritage brand traits that are essential to be considered for the corporate heritage brands in the retailing industry to sustain their innovativeness and competitiveness. The findings of the case study informed the four dimensions of corporate heritage brand identity, which include price, quality, symbol and design. The findings are incorporated into a theoretical framework of corporate heritage brand identity traits.

Practical implications

The discussed traits of this study can help brand senior management to enhance their corporate heritage reputation and sustainability through maintaining these (four) traits over their brand, and inform their brand stakeholders about their brand heritage success.

Originality/value

This is one of the few attempts to develop a research framework of corporate heritage brand identity. This framework suggests four dimensions of corporate heritage brand identity traits including brand price, quality, design and symbol. This is one of the first attempts to study corporate heritage branding management traits in the retailing industry sector.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

P. Van Rensburg and D.A. Prülaid

This article develops an econometric valuation methodology that is applied to identifying value in South African red wines. It is found that quality, as simultaneously…

Abstract

This article develops an econometric valuation methodology that is applied to identifying value in South African red wines. It is found that quality, as simultaneously measured by Wine magazine and Platter star ratings, is the dominant factor in explaining the cross‐section of prices. However, together with a varietal dummy these factors are only able to explain about 40% of the variation in wine prices. This implies that there is considerable value that may be gleaned through informed bargain seeking using this tool. Indeed, at certain levels of value there is more than a 50% differential in price.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Trevor John Price

This research investigates the use of real-time online polling to enhance university teaching and learning.

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the use of real-time online polling to enhance university teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study and employing action research, this work shows how polling can improve professional practice, learner engagement and teaching performance.

Findings

Incorporating the right type of online real-time polling into lessons is a professional challenge and can be hard work for teachers but has overriding benefits.

Research limitations/implications

This research reports one lecturer's experiences within two UK universities, limited to location, variety of students and lecturer technical capability. The research implications are that online polling, especially in different learning environments, is needed. Previous research is outdated or limited to real-time polling for teaching and learning during physical classes. There are research opportunities therefore in the use of polling before, during and after class.

Practical implications

This research finds that the field of online polling needs to be seen as a modern teaching tool that now uses students' personal technology for easier use by students and teachers: it is more than the use of archaic “clickers” which were extra classroom items to be bought and maintained. Also, online polling, before, during and after classes, can be employed usefully and have validity within teachers' toolboxes. This paper shows how such polls can be successfully deployed.

Originality/value

Whilst there are previous reports of polling undertaken within teaching and learning events, this paper builds upon those experiences and boosts collective understanding about the use of polling as a way to improve professional practice and increase learning.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

Howard Johnson

A nostrum much quoted in traditional contract law courses is ‘caveat emptor’ (let the buyer beware). Buyers had to look after themselves and protect their own interests…

Abstract

A nostrum much quoted in traditional contract law courses is ‘caveat emptor’ (let the buyer beware). Buyers had to look after themselves and protect their own interests. The laissez‐faire philosophy which lay behind this maxim took the view that the operation of unrestrained market forces was the best method for protecting consumers as a whole. Emphasis was placed on free competition providing alternative choices as the best way of satisfying consumer wants. In reality, even in the mid‐19th century when this philosophy was dominant, the consumer was not left without the protection of the law. Freedom of contract notionally existed and much judicial rhetoric was expended on justifying it but in reality the courts were quite astute in protecting consumers in situations where they were the victims of fraud, trading malpractice or unequal contracts.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1911

“UNDER the clock at Charing Cross Station at 8.30 p.m.” So ran our instructions for Thursday, April 13th. The weather for a fortnight past had brought snow, a wind that…

Abstract

“UNDER the clock at Charing Cross Station at 8.30 p.m.” So ran our instructions for Thursday, April 13th. The weather for a fortnight past had brought snow, a wind that was nipping and eager, and weather prophets were not sanguine. One London periodical indeed had burst out with a quotation from Browning adapted to the circumstances:

Details

New Library World, vol. 13 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Lin Sun, Mingxian Qi and Michael R. Reed

Many grain exporting/importing countries implement temporary trade policies to intervene in grain trade volume during food crises. The purpose of this paper is to analyze…

Abstract

Purpose

Many grain exporting/importing countries implement temporary trade policies to intervene in grain trade volume during food crises. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of Chinese soybean trade policies on the domestic soybean market during the food crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

A Markov switching error correction model is constructed for the empirical analysis. Market integration, market equilibrium and market stability are compared among three regimes: the normal state, crisis state and post-crisis state. In order to reduce the disturbance from external markets factors on the results, the US soybean market is selected as a control group in that it did not use any soybean intervention trade policies during the food crisis.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that China’s temporary soybean trade policies lead to a decrease in market integration between domestic and international soybean markets and a reduction in domestic soybean market stability.

Originality/value

It is the first time that China’s soybean market is selected as a sample and case on this issue. The regime shifting non-linear model could be more applicable because there exists a non-linear transmission relationship between grains markets during food crises. The results imply that China’s temporary soybean trade policies do not improve market integration and stability. China should reconsider implementing soybean trade intervening policies to protect the domestic market and safeguard food security.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Sandra C. Buttigieg, Wilfried von Eiff, Patrick Farrugia and Maximilian C. von Eiff

Point-of-care testing (POCT) at the Emergency Department (ED) attains better objectives in patient care while aiming to achieve early diagnosis for faster medical…

Abstract

Purpose

Point-of-care testing (POCT) at the Emergency Department (ED) attains better objectives in patient care while aiming to achieve early diagnosis for faster medical decision-making. This study assesses and compares the benefits of POCT in the ED in Germany and Malta, while considering differences in their health systems.

Methodology/approach

This chapter utilizes multiple case study approach using Six Sigma. The German case study assesses the use of POCT in acute coronary syndrome patients, compared to the central lab setting. The Maltese case study is a pilot study of the use of medical ultrasonography as a POCT to detect abdominal free fluid in post-blunt trauma.

Findings

This study provides clear examples of the effectiveness of POCT in life-threatening conditions, as compared to the use of traditional central lab or the medical imaging department. Therapeutic quality in the ED and patient outcomes directly depend upon turnaround time, particularly for life-threatening conditions. Faster turnaround time not only saves lives but reduces morbidity, which in the long-term is a critical cost driver for hospitals.

Originality/value

The application of Six Sigma and the international comparison of POCT as best practice for life-threatening conditions in the ED.

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1966

Most countries seek to impose control on the chemical treatment of both human and animal food. Some, such as the U.S.A., attempt it by highly detailed regulations, in…

Abstract

Most countries seek to impose control on the chemical treatment of both human and animal food. Some, such as the U.S.A., attempt it by highly detailed regulations, in terms most orthodox and almost psychically specific, which seem most complicated compared with our own simplified food ordinances; other countries, such as many of the newer states, treading cautiously in their virgin fields of law‐making, pass broad, enabling laws, leaving details to be filled in later. Although the object is the same in all countries, it is nothing short of amazing how the pattern of legislation manages to be so divergent, and applied for reasons that are not always apparent. In published regulations and laws, there would seem to be less intent on making a country's food exports conform to the legislative requirements of importing countries than in prescribing standards for its home products; the end results have produced food law chaos, rarely seen in other branches of law. A notable exception, the only one, to these irregular developments, and with particular reference to food additive control, are the common decrees and directives of the European Economic Community, representing the six Common Market countries. Its Council prescribes quality standards for individual foods, specific purity standards for preservatives and other additives which may be used for human consumption, and although this standardisation is only beginning, it deserves study, especially the manner in which the community regulations are enforced.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 68 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

John Hogan and Tom Lucke

The purpose of this article is to reveal several issues surrounding old style twentieth century pricing traps that need to be overcome in the twenty‐firt century global

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to reveal several issues surrounding old style twentieth century pricing traps that need to be overcome in the twenty‐firt century global economy and expanding internet marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The information on which this article is based derives from the authors' experience and expertise advising and supporting companies of all sizes over many years. There is further evidence from surveys done by a professional association.

Findings

Pricing is vital component to revenue and profit success and needs to be a functional lever for every company.

Practical implications

Whether introducing new products/services or upgrades to existing products/services, better revenue/profit margins can be accomplished by establishing a viable and value‐based pricing strategy.

Original/value

Pricing strategy is an essential element for doing business successfully in the global marketplace.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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