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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

John J. Oliver and Emma Parrett

This paper aims to provide an overview of the role that scenario planning can play in managing the uncertainty caused by changing and unpredictable competitive dynamics.

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1700

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the role that scenario planning can play in managing the uncertainty caused by changing and unpredictable competitive dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint reflects both the practical experience of strategic planners, combined with an academic insight into the advantages of using scenario planning as a management tool.

Findings

Firms can develop corporate level strategy and gain long-term certainty in their strategic approach by using scenario planning to strategize in a way that allows them to prepare for multiple futures, with multiple strategies.

Practical implications

Firms can manage environmental uncertainty and turbulence by being “mentally prepared” to address the future by evaluating the critical uncertainties driving turbulence and the strategic options relevant to a number of possible future outcomes.

Originality/value

A unique combination of practical experience fused with academic knowledge on harnessing the power of scenario planning to manage uncertainty and develop organizational strategy.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

John J. Oliver

This paper examines the role that corporate culture plays in shaping firm performance. It specifically examines how a corporate crisis event resulted in adaptive cultural…

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432

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the role that corporate culture plays in shaping firm performance. It specifically examines how a corporate crisis event resulted in adaptive cultural responses that may be inhibiting the level of firm innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research presents a longitudinal analysis of risk and innovation words contained in Barclays Plc corporate annual reports.

Findings

In the wake of corporate fraud and punitive charges, Barclays Plc introduced a number of new governance structures and a new code of conduct for employees. These initiatives moved the firm away from excessive risk taking, but may have also placed an emphasis on risk aversion at the expense of innovation.

Practical implications

The insight provided by this viewpoint and analysis may help CEOs and their management teams to better understand how changes in strategy, and or new corporate initiatives, create adaptive changes in culture. These changes, whilst making improvements in one area, may detract from performance in other parts of the firm.

Originality/value

This paper provides a highly original look at corporate culture and has employed an innovative methodology to underpin the analysis and subsequent viewpoint.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

John J. Oliver

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how two media firms, Sky Plc and Pearson Plc, adapted, reconfigured, and transformed their businesses to meet the demands of an…

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1286

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how two media firms, Sky Plc and Pearson Plc, adapted, reconfigured, and transformed their businesses to meet the demands of an operating environment characterized by inexorable changes in digital technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The over-arching vision, corporate strategies, and financial performance for both firms are examined over two business cycles.

Findings

These findings illustrate why firms need to create a portfolio business that takes advantage of the market opportunities created by innovative digital technologies, while off-setting the risks associated with digital disruption.

Practical implications

Business leaders should not dispense with the basic principles of good strategic business unit portfolio management in their attempts to take advantage of the market opportunities provided by a disruptive digital environment.

Originality/value

This paper provides a highly original insight into how two firms placed ambitious levels of growth at the heart of their corporate strategies to seize the market opportunities provided by an increasingly digital operating environment.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

John J. Oliver and Newton Velji

This paper aims to discuss the emerging theme of risk aversion in entrepreneurs following high levels of industry consolidation.

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211

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the emerging theme of risk aversion in entrepreneurs following high levels of industry consolidation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a viewpoint on the authors’ opinion and interpretation of industry consolidation.

Findings

The UK Independent TV Production Industry has experienced a remarkable degree of consolidation with corporate acquisitions and mergers changing the size, shape and revenue distribution among firms in the industry. In addition, entrepreneurs appear to be more risk averse in terms of entering the industry.

Practical implications

If the trend in entrepreneurs in the UK TV Production Industry being more risk averse continues, then the number of new startup firms will fall and that could put the future of the industry at jeopardy.

Originality/value

This paper presents an interesting observation on the impact of consolidation of the UK Independent TV Production Industry, in so far as, entrepreneurs appear to be becoming more risk averse.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

John J. Oliver

The purpose of this paper is to provide a strategic commentary on the interconnected areas of corporate strategy and employee performance by illustrating how two…

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2438

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a strategic commentary on the interconnected areas of corporate strategy and employee performance by illustrating how two organizations adapted and transformed their businesses to the demands of digitalization and new media.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal analysis (1995-2015) of employee productivity was calculated as operating income per employee for each firm and benchmarked against industry data.

Findings

Both firm’s corporate objectives and strategies were focused on ambitious levels of growth and the opportunities provided by an increasingly digital environment. However, the firms had transformed their businesses in different ways with distinct employee productivity performance outcomes.

Practical implications

This paper provides case studies of strategic transformation and argues that HR management strategies and practices need to be continually evaluated to assess their employee productivity in an uncertain digital operating environment.

Originality/value

This paper provides a longitudinal analysis of how media firms, Sky Plc and Pearson Plc, adapted, reconfigured and transformed their businesses to meet the demands of an operating environment characterized by inexorable changes in digital technologies. It presents data and conclusions on how the management of “human resources” had delivered different employee productivity outcomes over the long term.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2020

Paul Clemens Murschetz, Afshin Omidi, John J. Oliver, Mahyar Kamali Saraji and Sameera Javed

Dynamic capabilities (DCs) help media firms adapt to rapidly changing environments. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive literature review of studies of…

Abstract

Purpose

Dynamic capabilities (DCs) help media firms adapt to rapidly changing environments. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive literature review of studies of DCs in strategic management research with a view to understanding its implications for the management of media organizations. Essentially, it fertilizes on the idea that the concept of DC is useful and vital for answering various critical questions regarding the challenges that media organizations are currently facing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study builds on a systematic literature reviewing design as the research methodology. It aims to identify, critically evaluate, and integrate factors, dimensions, and findings on studies of DCs in strategic management research and builds knowledge transfers to the field of strategic management research in the media industry.

Findings

The study shows that the DC framework helps media firms effectively respond to changing environments. The conceptual DC framework has implications for media strategy practice. Results indicate a considerable growth in the number of papers published related to the DCs in media organizations from 2003 to 2018.

Originality/value

The study qualifies the relevance and validity of the DC framework in strategic management research for the field of strategic media management. It explores a research agenda in this domain by precisely explaining the significant trends in the theory of DC to shape managerial strategies in the media industry.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

John Oliver

CEO turnover and chronic corporate underperformance are examined through the lens of Transgenerational Response.

Abstract

Purpose

CEO turnover and chronic corporate underperformance are examined through the lens of Transgenerational Response.

Design/methodology/approach

The criteria for investigating Transgenerational Response in corporations consisted of identifying a Critical Corporate Incident, the number of corporate generations and the resultant corporate financial performance.

Findings

The evidence presented in the case studies illustrates how a Critical Corporate Incident has produced the consequential effect of chronic financial performance in the years following the incident.

Research limitations/implications

These case studies have not presented the “actual” adaptive responses, inherited attitudes and behaviours that have subsequently embedded themselves in a new corporate culture, post the Critical Corporate Incident, to the detriment of the long-term health and performance of each firm.

Practical implications

Examining CEO turnover and chronic corporate underperformance through the lens of Transgenerational Response means that business leaders can identify how a historic event has affected the performance of their firm in subsequent generations. With this knowledge in hand, they will be able to examine the inherited attitudes and behaviours, organizational policies, strategy and adaptive cultural routines that have combined to consolidate the firms chronic under performance.

Originality/value

This is a highly original, evidence based, idea that has the potential to reshape our current understanding of CEO turnover and underperforming firms. It will help business leaders identify how a historic event has affected the performance of a firm in subsequent generations.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

John J. Oliver

This paper provides further evidence on a thought-provoking idea, Transgenerational Response, which was previously presented in this journal. It argues that a corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides further evidence on a thought-provoking idea, Transgenerational Response, which was previously presented in this journal. It argues that a corporate crisis event can create dysfunctional adaptive attitudes and behaviors which subsequently become embedded in the corporate culture of a firm to the detriment of its long-term performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method approach consisting of longitudinal content analysis of innovation and risk words in corporate annual reports and quantitative financial analysis divided the data into ‘what happened before the crisis event’ and ‘what happen after the crisis event’.

Findings

Case studies for AIG and Yahoo illustrate how a crisis event produced chronic financial performance and adaptive cultural responses that include a fall in innovation and an increased emphasis on risk in the years following the incident.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not make claims of generalisability of the findings. However, it does provide a platform for future researchers to develop this line of reasoning and perhaps extend it to consider why some organizations demonstrate greater levels of resilience when faced with a crisis.

Practical implications

Identifying a Transgenerational Response means that business leaders can identify how a historic event has affected the performance and cultural dynamics of their firm over time. As such, it will be easier to manage the inherited cultural attitudes and behaviours that have combined to consolidate a firms chronic underperformance.

Originality/value

This highly original, evidence-based idea, has the potential to reshape our current understanding of corporate turnarounds, CEO turnover, underperformance and adaptive cultural change.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

John J. Oliver

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841

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Bettina Friedrich and Oliver John Mason

Football exercise as an intervention for people with severe mental health problems has seen an increasing interest in the past years. To date, there is, however, no…

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5082

Abstract

Purpose

Football exercise as an intervention for people with severe mental health problems has seen an increasing interest in the past years. To date, there is, however, no comprehensive review of the empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of these interventions. In this review, the authors have comprised the research findings from the peer-review literature as well as the theoretical approaches to football exercise as an adjunct treatment. This overview will be informative to everybody who is planning to develop a football intervention for this population as well as to the people who are preparing evaluation studies that measure the effectiveness of such interventions. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identified research papers in the peer-review literature that feature empirical findings on “football interventions” that aim at improving mental and/or physical well-being in participants with mental health problems. The authors are using the term “football intervention” here in the sense that the participants actively took part in football exercise, so the authors excluded studies in which the participants only watched football or used football as a metaphor to discuss mental health problems. In a table, the authors indicate the definition of the target group, targeted outcomes, measured outcomes, form and frequency of the intervention as well as the research method(s).

Findings

The authors identified 16 studies on 15 projects. The majority of studies were qualitative and had positive findings in which the participants reported increased well-being and connectedness, elevation of symptoms and improved physical well-being. The outcomes of the quantitative studies, however, were mixed with some results suggesting that not all intended goals were achieved. There seems to be a need for more quantitative studies to triangulate the qualitative findings. Interestingly, most interventions take place in the UK. Many studies fail to give detailed methodological information and often the aims of the interventions are vague or not stated at all.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the heterogeneity of the studies and relative scarcity of evaluation projects on football interventions for people with mental health problems, the authors could not conduct an in-depth systematic review. Furthermore, the information on methods was often unsatisfying and despite efforts to get more detailed input from the authors of cited papers, those gaps could not always be filled. Instead of coming up with a crystal-clear summary of whether and how football interventions work for everybody, topics were identified that need to be addressed in the planning of interventions, in evaluation studies, in implementation efforts and in the theoretical discourse.

Practical implications

This paper constitutes a helpful overview for everybody who is interested in the theoretical background of football interventions for people with mental health problems, for people who are planning to develop respective interventions, for researchers who engage in evaluation projects that look into the effectiveness of football interventions (or similar exercise interventions) as well as for the people who are interested in how football interventions can be implemented. This paper is likely to make a contribution to the advancement of alternative exercise interventions that aim at improving mental, physical and social health in people with mental health problems.

Social implications

This paper will help putting the topic of football interventions (and similar, alternative exercise interventions) further up on the public health agenda by providing an overview of the empirical evidence at hand and by specifying advantages of the approach as well as pointing out actions that need to be taken to make football a recognised, evidence based and viable option for adjunct mental health treatment that is attractive to potential participants as well as funders as well as to the potential participants.

Originality/value

There is no comprehensive summary to date that provides a (reasonably) systematic overview of empirical findings for football interventions for people with MH problems. Furthermore, the literature on the theoretical background of these interventions has been somewhat patchy and heterogonous. This paper aims at filling both these gaps and identifies the issues that need to be covered in the planning of respective interventions and evaluations. This paper will be useful to everybody who is developing football interventions (or similar alternative adjunct exercise interventions), who is conducting evaluation research in this area and who is interested in the implementation of football interventions.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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