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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Barry O'Mahony

The purpose of this paper is to reveal insights into the relationship between migrant communities and the hospitality industry by examining the case study of Irish…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal insights into the relationship between migrant communities and the hospitality industry by examining the case study of Irish migrants into nineteenth century Victoria in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides examples of the pattern of engagement with the hospitality industry as well as individual and family stories that highlight how hotel‐keeping and the service of alcohol in Melbourne and regional Victoria in the mid‐to‐late 1800s, was a key element in social improvement and mobility of Irish migrants at that time.

Findings

Although the relationship between the English and the Irish in the nineteenth century could be classified as difficult, the tensions that characterised Anglo‐Irish relations in a European context were remarkably absent in colonial Australia. This paper describes how conditions in the colonies when the majority of Irish migrants arrived allowed them to use the hospitality industry to improve their social standing and to consolidate their position in Australian society.

Research limitations/implications

Migration presents an interesting interface between host communities and guest migrants, which go to the heart of hospitality. In addition, this case study suggests there are some interesting avenues to be followed by exploring cases of other migrant communities both in their relationships with hosts, but also in the opportunities offered by the hospitality industry for opportunities denied to migrants in wider community.

Practical implications

The opportunities offered to migrants in the hospitality industry can provide a useful means of engagement for migrants into host communities through employment, and more importantly through the cultural interface allowed through hospitality enterprises whereby the migrant as guest acts as host to host community members in hospitality entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The paper has value to both practitioners and academics because it provides an example of migrant experiences and the opportunities presented by the hospitality industry for employment, entrepreneurship and ultimately community integration.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Moss E. Norman, Michael Hart and Gerald Mason

The purpose of our chapter is to contribute to the current literature on sport and the environment by introducing an ethic of sustainability embedded in the historical and…

Abstract

The purpose of our chapter is to contribute to the current literature on sport and the environment by introducing an ethic of sustainability embedded in the historical and ongoing place-based physical cultures of Fisher River Cree Nation (Ochékwi Sipi).

Using an Indigenous-centered, community-based research design, we conducted four sharing circles with a total of 13 Elders from Fisher River Cree Nation. Sharing circles are a culturally safe discussion format for Elders to share their experiences and perspectives, which is significant in that Elders serve as critical links in the intergenerational communication of Cree place-based knowledge.

The key finding of this research is presented, centering around the more-than-human ethic that emerges from the place-specific stories of movement and physical culture shared by the Elders.

Based on the stories of the Elders we show how intimate and deeply embodied knowledges are formed over the course of generations of living with, learning from, and moving across Land. The knowledge gathered from this research presents an alternative to the dominant Western worldview and may serve as a critical link in struggles for environmental and social sustainability.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Vanessa Ann Quintal and David H. Wong

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Abstract

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Li‐teh Sun

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the…

Abstract

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the American preemptive invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq and the subsequent prisoner abuse, such an existence seems to be farther and farther away from reality. The purpose of this work is to stop this dangerous trend by promoting justice, love, and peace through a change of the paradigm that is inconsistent with justice, love, and peace. The strong paradigm that created the strong nation like the U.S. and the strong man like George W. Bush have been the culprit, rather than the contributor, of the above three universal ideals. Thus, rather than justice, love, and peace, the strong paradigm resulted in in justice, hatred, and violence. In order to remove these three and related evils, what the world needs in the beginning of the third millenium is the weak paradigm. Through the acceptance of the latter paradigm, the golden mean or middle paradigm can be formulated, which is a synergy of the weak and the strong paradigm. In order to understand properly the meaning of these paradigms, however, some digression appears necessary.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2009

John Miles

Advocacy, while a known phrase, is not fully understood, writes John Miles, a trustee and founder member of the Older People's Advocacy Alliance (OPAAL) UK. In this…

Abstract

Advocacy, while a known phrase, is not fully understood, writes John Miles, a trustee and founder member of the Older People's Advocacy Alliance (OPAAL) UK. In this article, John reviews the position of advocacy with older people as the government pursues its transformation of social care.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1970

Daniel Hay

‘DID YOU KNOW old John Simpson?’ I have lost count of the number of times I have been asked this question about my predecessor over the past thirty‐six years. Inevitably…

Abstract

‘DID YOU KNOW old John Simpson?’ I have lost count of the number of times I have been asked this question about my predecessor over the past thirty‐six years. Inevitably my interlocutor follows up his question with the statement, ‘He was a terror; you either took what he gave you out of a selection of two or three books, or did without’.

Details

Library Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 24 June 2009

Vivien Caughley

Hannah King occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross‐cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the…

Abstract

Hannah King occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross‐cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the only woman from the first 1814 Missionary settlement of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) in New Zealand to remain in New Zealand for the rest of her life, yet she does not have an entry in the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, and is rarely indexed in either New Zealand’s general historical works or even works more specifically related to the Missionary era. John and Hannah King were one of three artisan missionary couples who sailed with the Revd Samuel Marsden on his ship, the missionary brig ‘Active’, from Port Jackson, Australia to Rangihoua, in the Bay of Islands, in late 1814. Marsden’s 1814 Christmas Day service on the beach at Rangihoua is recognised as the beginning of missionary activity and planned European settlement on New Zealand soil.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Ellen McClung and Toby Eines

Within the past ten years Canada has experienced a renewed interest in its architectural past. Whether part of an international trend toward architectural conservation…

Abstract

Within the past ten years Canada has experienced a renewed interest in its architectural past. Whether part of an international trend toward architectural conservation (witness European Architectural Heritage Year, 1976), or part of a general reappraisal of all things Canadian and the development of a sense of nationalism, or the realization, painful as it may be, that the character of the urban landscape is quickly losing its familiar character, this renewed interest in our architectural heritage has surfaced, and is manifesting its presence in many ways. To any who would doubt the existence of a Canadian architectural heritage, or would quarrel with its worth, one has only to turn to Alan Gowans' prefatory remarks to his Building Canada: An Architectural History of Canadian Life:

Details

Collection Building, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Jaya Berk, Sonja Olsen, Jody Atkinson and Joanne Comerford

This paper seeks to examine the development of a pilot program for using podcasting as a tool in the provision of information literacy in an academic library. It aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the development of a pilot program for using podcasting as a tool in the provision of information literacy in an academic library. It aims to discuss the implementation process and the issues encountered in developing a podcasting series at the Curtin University Library.

Design/methodology/approach

The possibilities for using podcasts to deliver library information literacy in an academic library are discussed in reference to current literature and trends. The method for creating a podcasting series, including the equipment, software, RSS feed, legal issues and cost and staffing implications, is outlined along with the parameters used by the Curtin University Library in the development of a pilot series.

Findings

The paper finds that podcasts offer libraries a new method of delivering information literacy to their clients. It is possible to create a podcasting series with minimal expense and the simple production method enables many libraries to take advantage of this new technology. The podcasting series at Curtin has proven to be popular with downloads increasing steadily over the course of the semester. There have been over 9,000 downloads of the audio files to the end of November 2006. By taking advantage of this ubiquitous technology libraries can communicate with their clientele in a new and exciting way.

Originality/value

The paper outlines how to create a podcasting series for information literacy in an academic library environment, and provides recommendations for other libraries wishing to create their own podcasting series.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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