Search results

1 – 10 of over 8000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1987

John E. Elliott and Joanna V. Scott

This article examines relationships between capitalism and democracy as perceived by contending perspectives within the liberal capitalist‐liberal democratic tradition(s)…

Abstract

This article examines relationships between capitalism and democracy as perceived by contending perspectives within the liberal capitalist‐liberal democratic tradition(s). Bentham and the Mills are taken as initiating both this tradition and the core elements of the debate within it. Pre‐Benthamite theories are first reviewed. Then, after discussion of Bentham and James Mill and of John Stuart Mill, Mill's late nineteenth and early twentieth century successors are examined. We then go on to consider hypotheses concerning the “exceptional” quality of relationships between capitalism and democracy in the United States. The penultimate section of the article adumbrates the main contours of mid‐twentieth century pluralist‐elitist theories. We conclude with a summary.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 14 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Abstract

Details

Histories of Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-997-9

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

John Mills, Keith Gibbs and Mike Todd

Presents an outline of a highly‐tailored management development process for the entire marketing group of Lloyds Bank’s Insurance Services Division (LBIS) in which…

Downloads
634

Abstract

Presents an outline of a highly‐tailored management development process for the entire marketing group of Lloyds Bank’s Insurance Services Division (LBIS) in which learning projects were a key feature. Discusses objectives of the projects for the directors, middle managers and junior managers involved, the areas and topics covered and the learning benefits achieved, both on a personal and an organizational level.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Including a Symposium on Mary Morgan: Curiosity, Imagination, and Surprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-423-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

David Ellerman and Tej Gonza

This paper collects together quotations and extracts from 19th and 20th century thinkers who were little-known for being supporters of workplace democracy.

Abstract

This paper collects together quotations and extracts from 19th and 20th century thinkers who were little-known for being supporters of workplace democracy.

Details

Journal of Participation and Employee Ownership, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-7641

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1982

“Communism has never concealed the fact that it rejects all absolute concepts of morality. It scoffs at any consideration of “good” and “evil” as indisputable categories…

Abstract

“Communism has never concealed the fact that it rejects all absolute concepts of morality. It scoffs at any consideration of “good” and “evil” as indisputable categories. Communism considers morality to be relative, to be a class matter… It has infected the whole world with the belief in the relativity of good and evil.” Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, Warning to the West, 1975.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

P. Bruce Buchan

This article examines the locus of power in the large corporation (The East India Company) over a 125 year period and the career paths of two of its dominant players…

Abstract

This article examines the locus of power in the large corporation (The East India Company) over a 125 year period and the career paths of two of its dominant players (Laurence Sulivan and James Mill). Sulivan embodies the character of such modern powerful leaders as Jack Welch and Lee Iacocca. Mill represents the modern power broker associated with the “technostructure”. What gave rise to the technostructure? What were the qualities of Sulivan and Mill which allowed them to dominate the organization? These are two of the questions investigated.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1948

Under this heading are published monthly news of recent professional appointments, industrial developments and business changes, etc.

Abstract

Under this heading are published monthly news of recent professional appointments, industrial developments and business changes, etc.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

John Offer

The Poor Law Report of 1834 occupies an important, perhaps pre‐eminent place in attempts to understand changes in the distribution of power, social relations, and social…

Abstract

The Poor Law Report of 1834 occupies an important, perhaps pre‐eminent place in attempts to understand changes in the distribution of power, social relations, and social provision in the nineteenth century. Few other documents have set in progress such a multitide of far‐reaching changes. This is true even though the Poor Law Amendment Act of the same year, very closely related to the Report, diluted considerably its recommendations for policy ‐ as the Checklands say in the Introduction to their edition of the Report, “The Government, with the understandable intention of making things easier for itself and harder for its opponents, produced a Bill that was much less explicit than the Report” (1974, p. 42). The innovations flowing from the Report included: a specialist body at central level in London (the Poor Law Commissioners, given extensive powers to set in being general rules covering poor re‐lief); nationwide units of “local government”, the union, bringing into control as boards of guardians many new people, who gained their position through elections; more systematic construction of workhouses, which often dwarfed the other buildings in their towns or villages; and a circumscribing of the power in the hands of the Justices of the Peace, stalwarts of a less formal, more paternalistic and discretionary attitude to poor relief.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2006

Roberto Romani

In the first of the eleven essays making up this book, Bevir and Trentmann state the perspective unifying them. Against the rise of a “neo-liberal discourse” idealizing…

Abstract

In the first of the eleven essays making up this book, Bevir and Trentmann state the perspective unifying them. Against the rise of a “neo-liberal discourse” idealizing the market as a beneficial coordinating mechanism, Bevir and Trentmann point to the embeddedness of markets.1 In particular, they assert their cultural embeddedness, arguing that “how precisely any particular state or market operates will depend on how it is governed by a host of beliefs, discourses, practices, and institutions” (p. 10). The first goal of the volume is to provide historical case studies illustrating the richness of past conceptualizations of the relationship between society, markets, and the state (p. 2). The second goal is to reconsider the role played by “agency” in the history of capitalism.2 The editors argue against Karl Polanyi that liberals have not always been in favour of markets irrespective of social and environmental concerns, and that peasants and rural elites have not always defended traditional forms of social coordination. The general point is conveyed by the following passage: “The question was, for all these groups, not simply one of support or resistance to markets but about how markets should be embedded within social and political contexts. Social groups and intellectual traditions that were ambivalent about markets also helped to shape the contours and dynamics of capitalist societies” (p. 4). In other words, liberal market economies “arose as embedded within the context of particular types of civil society, which were themselves a contingent product of European history” (pp. 7–8).

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-349-5

1 – 10 of over 8000