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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

John McDonagh

This research paper aims to review the development of corporate real estate asset management (CREAM) in New Zealand since 1992.

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Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to review the development of corporate real estate asset management (CREAM) in New Zealand since 1992.

Design/methodology/approach

The first research into CREAM in New Zealand was carried out by Wei Kium Teoh. Lincoln University staff and post graduate students have subsequently undertaken several CREAM research projects involving surveys of organizations in New Zealand. These were spread over a 14 year time period and led to the opportunity to carry out a time series analysis of the development of CREAM practice in New Zealand.

Findings

Substantial improvement in some aspects of CREAM practice was observed, for example, in the qualifications of those responsible for CREAM and the development of strategic plans for those assets. However, other aspects of CREAM have remained remarkably stable or plateaued, for example the percentage of organizations with a separate real estate unit, reporting levels to management and the allocation of real estate costs.

Research limitations/implications

Both academic and industry attention in New Zealand can now be focused on those areas of CREAM development that appear to be lagging or otherwise warranting further research due to inconsistent results across the different studies.

Originality/value

CREAM research in a New Zealand context is limited. This paper collates and interprets much of that research with the added benefit of hindsight and trend analysis. The similarities in the findings with research carried out in other countries means international developments in CREAM are likely to be also applicable in a New Zealand context.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

John McDonagh and Timothy Hayward

The outsourcing of non‐core business activities has recently mushroomed throughout the worldas organisations seek reduced cost and strategic business advantage in an…

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Abstract

The outsourcing of non‐core business activities has recently mushroomed throughout the world as organisations seek reduced cost and strategic business advantage in an increasingly competitive marketplace. A component of this overall trend has been a dramatic increase in the extent to which real estate asset management functions of non‐property investment organisations have been taken over by ‘external service providers’. This study is the first in New Zealand to examine current practice and emergent trends and to identify outsourcing issues and problems in detail. Via a survey of 457 organisations, the reasons behind the trend to outsourcing are identified, as are the types of services outsourced; the basis of selection of service providers; the skills and attributes required of real estate professionals; and the success or otherwise of outsourcing experiences.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

John McDonagh and Gary Nichols

The purpose of this research is to investigate the strength of the link between overall business strategy and supporting property strategies in New Zealand organizations.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the strength of the link between overall business strategy and supporting property strategies in New Zealand organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Most organizations develop strategic business plans as a foundation and focus for decision‐making. These business plans ideally take account of the existing and potential operating environment and the strengths and weaknesses of the individual organization. An organization's management of its property assets can be either a strength, or a weakness, but does this aspect figure prominently in many organizations' strategic business plans? This research utilized e‐mail surveys of 313 organisations in New Zealand to determine the strength of the linkage between their overall business strategy and their property strategy.

Findings

Nearly all organizations surveyed had a clearly defined overall business strategy but many did not put corresponding effort into real estate strategies. Even amongst those organizations with a property strategy, significant weaknesses were found in the linkage between this strategy and overall business strategy.

Research limitations/implications

Further work can now be undertaken to measure the performance of organisations that have a strong connection between overall strategy and property strategy compared to those that do not. This may determine whether a strong connection does in fact correlate with business performance. If so, both academic and industry attention in New Zealand can then be focused on determining why some organizations' consideration of property as part of their overall business strategy is either non existent or ineffectual.

Originality/value

Corporate Real Estate Asset Management (CREAM) research in a New Zealand context is limited. This paper examines relationships that earlier literature has determined are important, in a New Zealand context. It highlights differences in the way New Zealand organizations operated and provides a basis for further research that should lead to improved organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

John McDonagh

This paper aims to determine trends in office building electricity use in New Zealand.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine trends in office building electricity use in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The research examined Property Council of New Zealand annual operating expense survey data for the period 1990‐2008 and identified trends in both electricity expense and consumption per square metre.

Findings

Electricity consumption was surprisingly stable over the study period and electricity expenditure per square metre decreased in real terms until very recently. There were some significant differences in the level of consumption between different quality buildings and different locations but the trends were the same.

Research limitations/implications

The findings revealed major problems in the accuracy and extent of electricity use data collected.

Social implications

Globally the built environment has been assessed as accounting for 40 per cent of energy consumption. While New Zealand generates most of its electricity from sustainable hydroelectric sources, there are limited opportunities to expand such generation. As a result, the NZ government has been promoting energy efficiency as a means to reduce growth in electricity demand. Efficiency policies relating to office buildings have recently been proposed, but few benchmark figures are available on which to base such policies.

Originality/value

Little research of this nature has occurred in New Zealand previously and it is necessary to establish benchmarks against which improvements in the sustainability of buildings can be measured. It is also important to identify problems in data collection so that benchmarks are robust.

Details

Property Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Clive M.J. Warren

381

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

25

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

32

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

99

Abstract

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Richard A. Gray

In his apocalyptic book on the environment and public policy, Timothy C. Weiskel warned of the consequences of humanity's intrusion into the biological and geo‐chemical…

Abstract

In his apocalyptic book on the environment and public policy, Timothy C. Weiskel warned of the consequences of humanity's intrusion into the biological and geo‐chemical processes of the natural world. He said that our intrusions have been massive and thorough; that they now threaten to transform ecosystemic parameters; and that unless responsible public policy directs itself toward moderating our current destructive impact on the environment, we will face ecosystemic collapse and human catastrophe “on a vastly greater scale than has ever been recorded in human history.”

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

John Conolly and Paul Ashton

This paper aims to describe a novel collaboration between a worker and a former service user in developing two support groups – an art group and an “alcoholics anonymous…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a novel collaboration between a worker and a former service user in developing two support groups – an art group and an “alcoholics anonymous group” self help group – at a central London “Wet” hostel for the homeless. The paper seeks to explore the issues raised for both workers in this experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a jointly written case study of innovative and reflective practice. It begins with an overview of policy frameworks and research that promote and advocate inclusion practice; then gives an account of the origins and development of the collaboration initiative; and concludes with reflections from each of the participants on what they have gained from the experience.

Findings

The main challenge for professionals lies in the need for “self‐reflective” practice and to challenge their own personal investments in the maintenance of their professional role and status. For ex‐service users, the challenge is to overcome low self‐confidence, the safety of the all‐too‐familiar “service user” role, and to realise that, despite real obstacles, a productive, useful contribution can be made to society. This can therefore be seen as a journey for both parties.

Social implications

Working with multiple exclusion homelessness can leave professionals feeling isolated and deskilled, leading people with complex needs to be further excluded from services that feel that they do not fit their criteria. Tackling these issues requires time for reflection on the personal issues raised.

Originality/value

The paper provides unique learning and insight into the development and running of support groups, resulting from the novel collaboration between a worker and a former service user.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

1 – 10 of 182