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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

John J. De Nobile and John McCormick

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between biographical variables of gender, age experience and employment position and occupational stress of staff…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between biographical variables of gender, age experience and employment position and occupational stress of staff members in Catholic primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 356 staff members from Catholic primary schools in New South Wales, Australia. Research hypotheses were tested using multivariate analysis and comparison of means.

Findings

Age, gender and position are found to be related to three out of the four identified domains of occupational stress as well as overall occupational stress. In addition, male staff experience higher levels of general occupational stress than their female colleague overall.

Practical implications

The findings hold implications for school systems and school administrators in relation to teacher retention, schools as organizations and gender issues. Further research regarding stress of teacher's aides is also recommended.

Originality/value

The paper includes non‐teaching staff and investigates the role of employment position as a biographical variable.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

John De Nobile, John McCormick and Katherine Hoekman

– This paper reports two related studies of relationships between organizational communication and occupational stress of staff members in Catholic primary schools.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports two related studies of relationships between organizational communication and occupational stress of staff members in Catholic primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from both studies were obtained using survey questionnaires. Participants were staff members of Catholic diocesan primary schools in New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory and Queensland, Australia. Research hypotheses were tested using correlation and multiple regression analyses.

Findings

Ten organizational communication factors and four occupational stress domains were identified. Several organizational communication variables were found to be predictors of occupational stress in four identified domains.

Practical implications

The findings provide implications for school administrators in relation to staff member access to formal communication channels, openness and approachability of principals, and support giving between school administration and staff, as well as among staff.

Originality/value

The studies used a conceptual framework of organizational communication that is unique and comprehensive. The paper contributes new knowledge in an area that has received little attention, namely, communication in schools.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

John McCormick and Paul L. Ayres

The purpose of this research was to study teachers' self‐efficacy and occupational stress in the context of a large‐scale curriculum reform in New South Wales, Australia…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to study teachers' self‐efficacy and occupational stress in the context of a large‐scale curriculum reform in New South Wales, Australia. The study aims to follow up and replicate a study carried out approximately one year earlier.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework, primarily based on social cognitive theory and the teachers' attribution of responsibility for stress model and consistent with the earlier study, was used to guide the research. Data were gathered using a self‐report questionnaire. Analysis was carried out using structural equation modelling, based on results of the earlier study, and partial correlation analysis.

Findings

A more parsimonious model of the related phenomena than had been established by the earlier study was confirmed, suggesting that the context of the educational reform was different one year later, particularly in terms of perceived social support and occupational stress specifically associated with the changes. The important result from the earlier study was replicated – understanding what was required by the reform was negatively associated with teachers' self‐efficacy for the new type of teaching and self‐efficacy for using technology with the new curriculum.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into teachers' cognitions associated with a major curriculum reform. Results have implications for system administrators and reforming curriculum bodies.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

John McCormick and Kerry Barnett

It may be argued that some shared psychological mechanisms (attribution) and structures (schemas) are likely to play a role in how individuals perceive stress. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

It may be argued that some shared psychological mechanisms (attribution) and structures (schemas) are likely to play a role in how individuals perceive stress. This paper seeks to propose and test some hypothesised relationships between stress attribution domains and burnout dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants were 416 classroom teachers in 38 randomly selected high schools in New South Wales, Australia. Two established instruments, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the Teachers' Attribution of Responsibility for Stress Scale were employed in a postal survey. Data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and multilevel modelling.

Findings

Most variance was at the individual level, supporting the view that the stress and burnout were overwhelmingly psychological phenomena. Findings suggest the centrality of stress attributed to student misbehaviour in predicting each of the three dimensions of burnout: depersonalisation, emotional exhaustion, and personal accomplishment. Occupational stress attributed to personal failings also negatively predicted personal accomplishment.

Practical implications

The principal implication for practice is that greater emphasis should be placed on effective management of student behaviour when assisting teachers at risk of burnout.

Originality/value

This original study provides new insights into attribution schemas to assist understanding teachers' perceptions and reporting of their occupational stress and burnout in an education system.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

John McCormick, Paul L. Ayres and Bernice Beechey

The main research aim was to investigate relationships among teachers' occupational stress, coping, teacher self‐efficacy and relevant teachers' perceptions of curriculum…

Abstract

Purpose

The main research aim was to investigate relationships among teachers' occupational stress, coping, teacher self‐efficacy and relevant teachers' perceptions of curriculum changes in a major educational reform.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework that included the attribution of responsibility for stress model, aspects of social cognitive theory and perceptions of the changes to the HSC, was used to guide the study. Multilevel variance decomposition and structural equation modelling were employed.

Findings

Stress attributions to personal and organizational domains were associated with the teachers' perceived stress from implementation of the new curriculum. Furthermore, results suggested that these teachers may have coped with stress associated with the changes using palliative strategies rather than direct problem solving. Teachers' greater understanding of what the curriculum changes entailed was associated with lower teacher self‐efficacy.

Practical implications

Emphasises that curriculum reform cannot be carried out in a vacuum, and that teachers' mental models or schemata of the education system within which they work are likely to influence their interpretations of the reform and its implementation. Analyses provide insights into teachers' cognition in relation to stress and self‐efficacy during curriculum change.

Originality/value

The nature of the reform, which was the focus of this study, is relatively rare, for both the magnitude of the curriculum change and the size of the education system (750,000 students) involved.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

John J. De Nobile and John McCormick

This study's purpose is to examine the relationships between the biographical characteristics gender, age, years of experience and employment position, and job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study's purpose is to examine the relationships between the biographical characteristics gender, age, years of experience and employment position, and job satisfaction of staff members in Catholic primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 356 staff members from Catholic primary schools. Research hypotheses were tested using multivariate analysis and comparison of means.

Findings

Age, gender and position were related to a number of facets of job satisfaction as well as overall job satisfaction. No significant relationships were identified for years of experience.

Practical implications

The findings hold implications for Catholic diocesan school systems and school administrators in relation to teacher retention and for further research regarding teacher's aides.

Originality/value

This study includes non‐teaching staff and investigates the role of employment position as a biographical variable.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

John McCormick and Kerry Barnett

The purpose of this paper was to posit and test hypotheses concerned with relationships between teachers' demographics, locus of control and career stages.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to posit and test hypotheses concerned with relationships between teachers' demographics, locus of control and career stages.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample consisting of 416 Australian non‐executive high school teachers was gathered from 40 randomly selected high schools. Multilevel regression analysis reflecting the nested nature of the sample of teachers within schools, and allowing for testing for school effects, was employed.

Findings

The paper finds that significant gender and years of teaching experience differences were identified for a number of career stages. There were positive relationships between years of teaching experience and later career stages. A number of multilevel models relating locus of control and demographic variables to career stage were developed and are reported.

Originality/value

The paper shows that teachers' generalized beliefs about personal control may be related to career stages and school practices should nurture beliefs in personal control, rather than dependence on powerful others in the school setting.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2016

Aparna Krishnan, Kerry Barnett, John McCormick and Geoffrey Newcombe

The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate independent school Boards as teams using a social cognitive perspective. Specifically, the study investigated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate independent school Boards as teams using a social cognitive perspective. Specifically, the study investigated Board processes and the nature of relationships between Board member self-efficacy, Board collective efficacy and performance of independent school Boards in New South Wales, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study design that used qualitative research methods was employed. An expert steering group provided advice on the categorization of governance structures. A stratified purposeful sample of eight independent school Boards within the Sydney metropolitan area, New South Wales Australia participated. Data were collected from individual, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with the Head of school, Board Chair and two Board members from each school. The interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using qualitative data analysis procedures suggested in the literature.

Findings

The findings provide evidence that for independent school Board members in this study, self-efficacy and collective efficacy beliefs were related to perceptions of Board performance. Board member self-efficacy and Board collective efficacy appeared to be linked. Self-efficacy beliefs were primarily based on mastery experiences. Collective efficacy (at the individual level) primarily was based on members’ perceptions of Board past performance.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into individual Board member beliefs likely to shape processes associated with independent school Board performance in New South Wales, Australia. The study is one of only a few that have adopted an empirical and descriptive approach, rather than only providing normative direction and imperatives.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration , vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

John T. McCormick and Nancy Paterson

This paper explores the threat that transnational political corruption poses to both the world's development banking and commercial banking sectors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the threat that transnational political corruption poses to both the world's development banking and commercial banking sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper was written from the perspective of someone who has served as a financial fraud prosecutor, an investigator for the World Bank, and currently as a banking supervisor and regulator. The paper uses three case studies to demonstrate how corrupt actors, using various fraudulent and corrupt schemes, steal funds from development banks, and then launder the illicit proceeds from these schemes into legitimate commercial banking systems around the world.

Findings

The paper describes the reputational and financial risks posed to the commercial and development banking sectors from transnational political corruption, and predicts that these risks will grow as more signatory nations to various anti‐corruption treaties and conventions criminalize the bribery of foreign public officials.

Research limitations/implications

Left unchecked, both commercial and development banks face growing political, legal, and economic risks from political corruption.

Practical implications

Drawing on the lessons learned from the case studies analyzed in the paper, the author offers a number of practical recommendations aimed at reducing the threat posed to commercial and development banks from public corruption.

Originality/value

The paper establishes a common threat posed by transnational political corruption to both the commercial and development banking sectors.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Soma Hewa

Ponders on whether Abraham Flexner was responsible for the change in medical education in North America in the early 20th century, owing to his report of 1910. Tries to…

Abstract

Ponders on whether Abraham Flexner was responsible for the change in medical education in North America in the early 20th century, owing to his report of 1910. Tries to demonstrate that medical education in the USA was part of a greater whole of major changes at that time. Concludes, though there was a philanthropic influence, Flexner (who refused to accept credit for change) was not the father of the medical reform plan.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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