Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

John M. Carroll, Sherman R. Alpert, John Karat, Mary S. Van Deusen and Mary Beth Rosson

Raison d'Etre is a hypermedia design history application. It provides access to a database of video clips containing stories and personal perspectives of design team…

Abstract

Raison d'Etre is a hypermedia design history application. It provides access to a database of video clips containing stories and personal perspectives of design team members recorded at various times during the course of a project. The system is intended to provide a simple frame‐work for recording and organizing the informal history and rationale that design teams create and share in the course of their collaboration. This article describes 1) the scenarios of use the authors are trying to support, 2) the methods they used collecting and organizing the database, and 3) the status of their prototype.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Chien Wen Yuan, Benjamin V. Hanrahan and John M. Carroll

Timebanking is a generalized, voluntary service exchange that promotes use of otherwise idle resources in a community and facilitates community building. Participants…

Abstract

Purpose

Timebanking is a generalized, voluntary service exchange that promotes use of otherwise idle resources in a community and facilitates community building. Participants offer and request services through the mediation of the timebank software. In timebanking, giving help and accepting help are both contributions; contributions are recognized and quantified through exchange of time-based currency. The purpose of this paper is to explore how users perceive timebank offers and requests differently and how they influence actual use.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey study, conducted in over 120 timebanks across the USA, examines users’ timebanking participation, adapting dimensions of Technology Acceptance Model (TAM).

Findings

The authors found that perceived ease of use in timebanking platforms was positively associated with positive attitudes toward both requests and offers, whereas perceived usefulness was negatively associated with positive attitudes toward requests and offers. The authors also found that having positive attitudes toward requests was important to elicit behavioral intention to make a request, but that positive attitudes toward offers did not affect behavioral intentions to make offers.

Practical implications

The authors discussed these results and proposed design suggestions for future service exchange tools to address the issues the authors raised.

Originality/value

The study is among the first few studies that examine timebanking participation using large-scale survey data. The authors evaluate sociotechnical factors of timebanking participation through adapting dimensions of TAM.

Article
Publication date: 22 April 2002

Paul R. Murphy and James M. Daley

While mail surveys continue to be a widely used research technique, relatively little empirical research exists that assesses their effectiveness among industrial…

Abstract

While mail surveys continue to be a widely used research technique, relatively little empirical research exists that assesses their effectiveness among industrial (commercial) organizations. To address this literature void, the present paper reports the findings from a mail survey of international freight forwarders. More specifically, this paper investigates the influence of postcard prenotification with respect to response rates, response speed, response quality, response bias, and response cost effectiveness. The paper also discusses implications of the results and offers suggestions for further research.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Bridget Christine McHugh, Pamela Wisniewski, Mary Beth Rosson and John M. Carroll

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which negative online risk experiences (information breaches, explicit content exposure, cyberbullying and sexual…

10111

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which negative online risk experiences (information breaches, explicit content exposure, cyberbullying and sexual solicitations) cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in adolescents. The study also explores whether teens’ short-term coping responses serve to mitigate PTSD or, instead, act as a response to stress from online events.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a web-based diary design over the course of two months. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling with repeated measures.

Findings

The study confirmed that explicit content exposure, cyberbullying and sexual solicitations (but not information breaches) evoke symptoms of PTSD. Analyses also indicated that teens engage in active and communicative coping after they experience post-traumatic stress, regardless of risk type or frequency.

Practical implications

The authors found that teens took active measures to cope with online risks soon after they felt threatened (within a week). Actively coping with stressful situations has been shown to enhance adolescent resilience and reduce long-term negative effects of risk exposure. If these early coping behaviors can be detected, social media platforms may be able to embed effective interventions to support healthy coping processes that can further protect teens against long-term harm from exposure to online risks.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine situational PTSD symptoms related to four types of adolescent online risk exposure within the week exposure occurred. By applying two competing theoretical frameworks (the adolescent resilience framework and transactional theory of stress), the authors show empirical evidence that suggests short-term coping responses are likely a stress reaction to PTSD, not a protective factor against it.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

C.M. Chewar, D. Scott McCrickard and John M. Carroll

This work aims to probe how interface designers concerned with human‐computer interaction of community networks might use the theoretical constructs of social capital and…

3614

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to probe how interface designers concerned with human‐computer interaction of community networks might use the theoretical constructs of social capital and activity awareness.

Design/methodology/approach

A design model for community network interfaces is introduced that reconciles various computer‐mediated communication research contributions with support for typical community network scenarios of use. Using this model, an inspection is performed on existing community network implementations (available December 2002) and then the adequacy of the model for informing the design process is examined.

Findings

Based on the insight gained through this analysis, a generic prototype and new user evaluation method are introduced that allow survey of user reaction to community network design elements under differing conditions. It is shown how results obtained through this method frame a value‐chain understanding of conceptual tradeoffs.

Research limitations/implications

To demonstrate the new user evaluation method in an analysis of critical design tradeoffs, the issues of persistent virtual identity implementation and usage motivation are probed. However, the evaluation method must be validated with other issues and tested by researchers that were not part of its creation process.

Practical implications

Contributions from this paper include tools (a design model, a generic prototype, and an evaluation method) linking theory with community design artifacts, building on previous work. Evaluators now have indicators for assessing community informatics.

Originality/value

Interface designers of community networks and those interested in social capital theory will appreciate the link between practice and theory provided by this approach.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

John M. Carroll, Mary Beth Rosson, Philip L. Isenhour, Christina Van Metre, Wendy A. Schafer and Craig H. Ganoe

MOOsburg is a community‐oriented multi‐user domain. It was created to enrich the Blacksburg Electronic Village by providing real‐time, situated, interaction, and a…

Abstract

MOOsburg is a community‐oriented multi‐user domain. It was created to enrich the Blacksburg Electronic Village by providing real‐time, situated, interaction, and a place‐based information model for community information. We are experimenting with an implementation fundamentally different from classic multi‐user domains object‐oriented (MOOs), supporting distributed system development and management, and a direct manipulation approach to navigation. To guide the development of MOOsburg, we are focusing on a set of community‐oriented applications, including a virtual science fair.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1967

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Abstract

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 19 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1967

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Abstract

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Lawrence W.C. Lai

This paper seeks to argue that racially discriminatory zoning in Colonial Hong Kong could have been a form of protectionism driven by economic considerations.

1383

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to argue that racially discriminatory zoning in Colonial Hong Kong could have been a form of protectionism driven by economic considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper was based on a review of the relevant ordinances, literature, and public information, notably data obtained from the Land Registry and telephone directories.

Findings

This paper reveals that many writings on racial matters in Hong Kong were not a correct interpretation or presentation of facts. It shows that after the repeal of the discriminatory laws in 1946, an increasing number of people, both Chinese and European, were living in the Peak district. Besides, Chinese were found to be acquiring land even under the discriminatory law for Barker Road during the mid‐1920s and became, after 1946, the majority landlords by the mid‐1970s. This testifies to the argument that the Chinese could compete economically with Europeans for prime residential premises in Hong Kong.

Research limitations/implications

This paper lends further support to the Lawrence‐Marco proposition raised in Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design by Lai and Yu, which regards segregation zoning as a means to reduce the effective demand of an economically resourceful social group.

Practical implications

This paper shows how title documents for land and telephone directories can be used to measure the degree of racial segregation.

Originality/value

This paper is the first attempt to systematically re‐interpret English literature on racially discriminatory zoning in Hong Kong's Peak area using reliable public information from Crown Leases and telephone directories.

Details

Property Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Recently Dr Erik Arnold, a consultant with Booz, Allen and Hamilton International produced an Evaluation Report which reviewed the UK Alvey Intelligent Knowledge‐Based…

Abstract

Recently Dr Erik Arnold, a consultant with Booz, Allen and Hamilton International produced an Evaluation Report which reviewed the UK Alvey Intelligent Knowledge‐Based Systems (IKBS) programme. The report gives a history of the programme and indicates its main aims and strategies. Its recommendations and evaluation are based on a comprehensive discussion of the programme's achievements as well as its weaknesses. The evaluation report says that the programme has been a big success in reviving the fortunes of Artificial Intelligence in the UK. For various reasons AI lost its initial impetus in the UK in the early 1970s and there were very few scientists and probably only one university department that could undertake research and development when the Japanese announcements brought the field to the fore. Indeed there was very little interest and support from UK industry and commerce at that time.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

1 – 10 of over 2000