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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

John Lin and Anthony Mills

Many facility managers are now required to deal directly with small firms engaged in the maintenance, alteration and cleaning of physical infrastructure. Increasingly the…

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12444

Abstract

Many facility managers are now required to deal directly with small firms engaged in the maintenance, alteration and cleaning of physical infrastructure. Increasingly the performance of small firms reflects on the manager of the facility, and so an understanding of their operation is required. It is mandatory for all firms to provide a safe working environment for their workers and subcontractors. Consequently, occupational health and safety (OHS) is a major issue for companies mainly due to the fear of prosecution. The introduction of Zero Tolerance by the Victorian government WorkCover Authority in 1999 provided even higher OHS safety standards for the construction industry. This has placed an increased burden on construction and maintenance companies especially small firms that are not in a position of financial strength. The size of the company has been found to be a major contributing factor to the OHS performance of construction contractors. This research is based on a benchmarking study of 44 construction companies in Victoria, Australia. The results show that the major factors influencing safety performance were; company size, and management and employee commitment to OHS.

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Facilities, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Calum G. Turvey

This paper aims to provide a “biography” of sorts on Agricultural Finance Review. The paper tracks the evolution of Agricultural Finance Review from its introduction in…

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9719

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a “biography” of sorts on Agricultural Finance Review. The paper tracks the evolution of Agricultural Finance Review from its introduction in 1938 to its current status.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a complete review of every paper and every issue. Not all papers were read by the author, but key papers of interest that in one way or another made significant contributions to the study of agricultural finance were reviewed.

Findings

The paper shows the evolution of agricultural finance from the early days of reporting financial data in the 1930s and 1940s, to its emergence as a major and significant sub discipline of the general field of agricultural economics.

Research limitations/implications

As indicated, not all papers were fully reviewed or read. It is possible that papers identified as “firsts” may have been preceded by other papers. Nonetheless the paper identifies the basic evolutionary path of the journal and defines key points in time when a paradigm shift emerged to change the direction of this discipline.

Practical implications

As Agricultural Finance Review transitions from the Department of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University to Emerald Group Publishing Limited, this “biography” provides readers with a general overview of the journal's and the discipline's historical development.

Originality/value

This paper is simply a review of the existing literature found in Agricultural Finance Review.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Binshan Lin and John A. Vassar

Investigates the three significant implications of the servicefactory for manufacturing managers: (1) the service factory is strategicin nature, (2) the dimensions and…

Abstract

Investigates the three significant implications of the service factory for manufacturing managers: (1) the service factory is strategic in nature, (2) the dimensions and attributes of the service factory should be addressed, and (3) managerial aspects must be included.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 92 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2017

Huthaifa AL-Khazraji, Colin Cole and William Guo

The purpose of this study is to propose a new dynamic model of a production-inventory control system. The objective of the new model is to maximise the flexibility of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a new dynamic model of a production-inventory control system. The objective of the new model is to maximise the flexibility of the system so that it can be used by decision makers to design inventory systems that adopt various strategies that provide a balance between reducing the bullwhip effect and improving the responsiveness of inventory performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed production-inventory control system is modelled and analysed via control theory and simulations. The production-inventory feedback control system is modelled through continuous time differential equations. The simulation experiments design is conducted by using the state-space model of the system. The Automatic Pipeline Inventory and Order-Based Production Control System (APIOBPCS) model is used as a benchmark production-inventory control system.

Findings

The results showed that the Two Automatic Pipelines, Inventory and Order-Based Production Control System (2APIOBPCS) model outperforms APIOBPCS in terms of reducing the bullwhip effect. However, the 2APIOBPCS model has a negative impact on Customer Service Level. Therefore, with careful parameter setting, it is possible to design control decisions to be suitably responsive while generating smooth order patterns and obtain the best trade-off of the two objectives.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the dynamics of single-echelon production-inventory control systems with zero desired inventory level.

Originality/value

This present model is an extension and improvement to Towill’s (1982) and John et al.’s (1994) work, since it presents a new dynamic model of a production-inventory control system which utilises an additional flow of information to improve the efficiency of order rate decisions.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Omar Ali, Anup Shrestha, Valmira Osmanaj and Shahnawaz Muhammed

The significance of cloud services in information technology (IT) is increasing as a means of achieving enhanced productivity, efficiency and cost reduction. Through…

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1155

Abstract

Purpose

The significance of cloud services in information technology (IT) is increasing as a means of achieving enhanced productivity, efficiency and cost reduction. Through cloud-based service, the reliability and scalability of an organization’s systems can be enhanced since organizations such as local governments are able to concentrate on their main business strategies. This research seeks to identify critical factors that may have an impact on the acceptance of cloud-based services, where the organizational context is based on local governments in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

To formulate a more comprehensive IT innovation adoption model for cloud technology, factors from the technology-organizational-environment framework, desires framework and diffusion of innovation model were integrated. Data was obtained from 480 IT staff working in 47 local government organizations.

Findings

The research results show that the factors which had a statistically significant and positive impact on the adoption of cloud-based services in local governments were compatibility, complexity, cost, security concerns, expected benefits and organization size. It is likely that the outcomes from this research will provide insights to any organization seeking to make investment decisions on the adoption of cloud-based services.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include generalizability of the findings since the data is restricted to local government areas in Queensland, Australia. Further, the sample mostly included individuals with managerial positions and may not completely capture the cloud adoption factors relevant for front line IT employees. Another limitation is the possible omission of factors that may be relevant but not considered due to the selected theories. Lastly, this research did not differentiate between different types of cloud adoption such as private, public, community and hybrid models that are possible in this context.

Originality/value

The paper provides a combination framework of cloud-based service adoption based on a literature review on cloud adoption from an IS perspective. It adapts integrated model to establish a more comprehensive innovation adoption framework for cloud technology.

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Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Helen Xu, Eric C. Lin and John W. Kensinger

Previous studies show that crude oil is negatively correlated with stocks but has almost the same rate of return as stocks, and so adding crude oil into a portfolio with…

Abstract

Previous studies show that crude oil is negatively correlated with stocks but has almost the same rate of return as stocks, and so adding crude oil into a portfolio with equities can provide significant diversification benefits for the portfolio. Given the diversification benefit of crude oil mixed with equities, we examine the value effect of crude oil derivatives transactions by oil and gas producers. Differing from traditional corporate risk management literature, this study examines corporate derivatives transactions from the shareholders' diversification perspective. The results show that crude oil derivatives transactions by oil and gas producers do impact value. If oil and gas producing companies stop shorting crude oil derivatives contracts, company stock prices increase significantly. In contrast, if oil and gas producing companies initiate short positions in crude oil derivatives contracts, stock prices tend to drop (still significant, but less so). Thus, hedging by producers is not necessarily good. Transaction limitation is shown to be one of the possible sources of the value effect of corporate derivatives transactions.

Details

Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-541-0

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

R. Bret Leary, Thomas Burnham and William Montford

This paper aims to introduce the implicit firm theory, distinguishing between the belief that firms can (incremental firm theory) or cannot (entity firm theory) readily…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce the implicit firm theory, distinguishing between the belief that firms can (incremental firm theory) or cannot (entity firm theory) readily change in response to marketplace demands. It is proposed and shown, that firm theory beliefs influence customer-engagement attitudes and intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 tests the relationship between firm theory, self-theory and knowledge-sharing attitudes. Study 2a tests differences between incremental and entity firm theorists in response to firm failure. Study 2b examines the relationship between firm theory and blame attributions on post-failure loyalty. Study 3 explores the effect of firm theory on perceptions of control and blame attributions following repeated firm failures.

Findings

Study 1 shows firm theory influences consumer knowledge-sharing attitudes beyond the effect of self-theory. Study 2a shows incremental firm theorists are more likely to remain loyal to a firm following failure and less likely to share negative word-of-mouth. Study 2b shows that blame attributions mediate the relationship between firm theory and loyalty intentions, with incremental theorists ascribing less blame. Study 3 shows incremental firm theorists significantly increase blame following multiple failures, while entity firm theorists do not.

Research limitations/implications

Results are based on scenario-based surveys and experimental methods; their applicability in more complex real-world customer-firm relationships warrants additional study.

Practical implications

Firms should account for a customer’s firm theory in their communications, emphasizing situational factors to reduce post-failure blame among incremental firm theorists.

Originality/value

Establishes that consumers hold beliefs regarding the malleability of firm traits, which influence their firm engagement intentions.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Hsiu‐Fen Lin and Gwo‐Guang Lee

To examine how socio‐technical factors (e.g. organizational climate and IT support) affect the intention to encourage knowledge sharing through their effects on three…

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5464

Abstract

Purpose

To examine how socio‐technical factors (e.g. organizational climate and IT support) affect the intention to encourage knowledge sharing through their effects on three innovation characteristics: perceived relative advantage, compatibility, and complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

The data from a survey of 154 senior executives in Taiwan were used empirically to test the proposed research model. Moreover, confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to examine the validity of the measurement model, and the structural model also was analysed to test the associations hypothesized in the research model.

Findings

The results showed that organizational climate significantly influences perceived relative advantage, compatibility, and complexity, which in turn positively affected the intention to encourage knowledge sharing. Contrary to previous studies, this study found that IT support did not significantly affect the three innovation characteristics of knowledge sharing.

Research limitations/implications

This paper was limited to examine the perceptions of senior executives regarding knowledge sharing. Therefore, a similar research model should be developed to predict and explain the determinants of organizational intention to encourage knowledge sharing by perceptions of employees.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that make an increased effort to allow employees to suggest ideas for new opportunities and foster a positive social interaction culture before introducing knowledge sharing initiatives. Specifically, creating an organizational climate characterized by top management support, open communication, stimulus to develop new ideas and respond rapidly to new opportunities is likely to encourage both management and employees to socialize and interact frequently with each other thus driving knowledge sharing intentions.

Originality/value

This paper has implications for business managers or policy makers to formulate policies and target organizations appropriately to ensure the effective creation of a knowledge sharing culture.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2007

Yang Xia, Yiyun Qiu and Ahmed U. Zafar

Many FDI studies focus on the advantages that businesses can gain through internationalization and internalization. More recent research has indicated that such…

Abstract

Many FDI studies focus on the advantages that businesses can gain through internationalization and internalization. More recent research has indicated that such traditional theories or perspectives may not sufficiently explain the subsequent success or failure of a firm’s operation in a foreign country, because the advantages gained through FDIs could be greatly affected by their strategic management in the host country environment. This study focused on the issue of a firm’s resources on its subsidiary’s competitiveness in a foreign country. A survey was undertaken in China. All companies participating in the study were small and medium‐sized Singapore‐China joint ventures and Singaporean wholly owned enterprises in China. The findings indicated that the variance in a firm’s performance in a foreign country can be largely explained by the six dimensions of firm resources: (1) technological resources, (2) owner/top manager’s managerial skills and capabilities, (3) employee’s Guanxi skills, (4) employee’s professional/technical knowledge, (5) the firm’s internal relationships and, (6) the firm’s external relationships. Among these six dimensions, employees’ professional knowledge and Guanxi skills, as well as a firm’s internal and external relationships, are significant predictors of Singaporean SMEs’ success in China.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Dominique Haughton, Guangying Hua, Danny Jin, John Lin, Qizhi Wei and Changan Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to propose data mining techniques to model the return on investment from various types of promotional spending to market a drug and then use…

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4163

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose data mining techniques to model the return on investment from various types of promotional spending to market a drug and then use the model to draw conclusions on how the pharmaceutical industry might go about allocating promotion expenditures in a more efficient manner, potentially reducing costs to the consumer. The main contributions of the paper are two-fold. First, it demonstrates how to undertake a promotion mix optimization process in the pharmaceutical context and carry it through from the beginning to the end. Second, the paper proposes using directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) to help unravel the direct and indirect effects of various promotional media on sales volume.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthetic data set was constructed to prototype proposed data mining techniques and two analyses approaches were investigated.

Findings

The two methods were found to yield insights into the problem of the promotion mix in the context of the healthcare industry. First, a factor analysis followed by a regression analysis and an optimization algorithm applied to the resulting equation were used. Second, DAG was used to unravel direct and indirect effects of promotional expenditures on new prescriptions.

Research limitations/implications

The data are synthetic and do not incorporate any time autocorrelations.

Practical implications

The promotion mix optimization process is demonstrated from the beginning to the end, and the issue of negative coefficient in promotion mix models are addressed. In addition, a method is proposed to identify direct and indirect effects on new prescriptions.

Social implications

A better allocation of promotional expenditures has the potential for reducing the cost of healthcare to consumers.

Originality/value

The contributions of the paper are two-fold: for the first time in the literature (to the best of the authors’ knowledge), the authors have undertaken a promotion mix optimization process and have carried it through from the beginning to the end Second, the authors propose the use of DAGs to help unravel the effects of various promotion media on sales volume, notably direct and indirect effects.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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