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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

The following list of titles was compiled by the Library Journal List Committee of the Reference and Adult Services Division, American Library Association. Committee…

Abstract

The following list of titles was compiled by the Library Journal List Committee of the Reference and Adult Services Division, American Library Association. Committee members include Larry Earl Bone, Memphis Public Library and Information Center, Chairman; Lynn Cochran, Free Library of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Carl T. Cox, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Laurel Grotzinger, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo; John Larsen, Columbia University, New York, New York; Wilbur McGill, Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Maryland; Mary Jean Nottviet, Iowa City, Iowa; Lelia B. Saunders, Arlington County Department of Libraries, Virginia; Paul Spence, University of Alabama in Birmingham. The 63 titles on this list represent in the opinion of the Committee, a selection of outstanding reference books published in 1973 and late 1972 for small and medium‐sized public and college libraries.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Kevin Walby and Alex Luscombe

Purpose – The chapter explores the use of freedom of information (ATI/FOI) requests in social science research, with specific focus on using ATI/FOI requests in…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter explores the use of freedom of information (ATI/FOI) requests in social science research, with specific focus on using ATI/FOI requests in socio-legal studies, criminal justice studies, and criminology.

Methodology/approach – ATI/FOI requests constitute a novel method of data collection that has methodological and also epistemological implications for researchers.

Findings – The chapter explains how to use ATI/FOI requests in social science as well as how to navigate challenges and barriers ATI/FOI users regularly face.

Originality/value – There is a paucity of writings on use of ATI/FOI requests in socio-legal studies, criminal justice studies, and criminology. The chapter reveals the value of using ATI/FOI in social science and the originality of the data that ATI/FOI requests can result in.

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Vanessa Pinfold, Paulina Szymczynska, Sarah Hamilton, Richard Peacocke, Shirley Dean, Naomi Clewett, Jill Manthorpe and John Larsen

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the process of co-producing mental health research where work was shared between university academics, charity-based researchers…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the process of co-producing mental health research where work was shared between university academics, charity-based researchers and a Lived Experience Advisory Panel.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors express the opinions of a research team made up of people with experience of using mental health services, being carers and being academically trained researchers from a range of health and social science disciplines. Some had experience in several areas. The paper is co-produced to provide collective reflection and recommendations.

Findings

Co-production of research is not well documented in published literature. The authors believe there is scope to develop co-production approaches, but further conceptual and theoretical work is needed alongside empirical studies. A socially situated complex research project, possibly involving multi-stakeholder groups, demands flexibility in approach. Similarly to user-controlled and other emancipatory methodologies, co-production makes the democratisation of research a primary objective in order to produce better quality and more relevant studies. Co-production also addresses inequalities in power and control within research projects; this way of working does provide a healthy challenge to traditional research hierarchies.

Practical implications

Lessons learned should be honestly shared to develop co-production research methods. Projects need to have a strategy for how to value different contributions and facilitate constructive relationships if discord emerges. Establishing clear project roles, expectations and process for payment are essential in developing genuine collaborative partnerships.

Originality/value

It is a viewpoint paper.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

John Larsen and Christopher Griffiths

– To evaluate the impact of crisis house admission in terms of mental health recovery and achievement of personal goals for people using the service.

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the impact of crisis house admission in terms of mental health recovery and achievement of personal goals for people using the service.

Design/methodology/approach

Mental Health Recovery Star (Recovery Star) and Personal Goal Scoring data were collected at entry and exit points in routine practice as part of a bespoke support planning process from 722 adults using one of three Rethink Mental Illness Crisis Houses. The adults had mental illness diagnoses including depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, and anxiety disorder.

Findings

There were significant increases in all ten Recovery Star domains, for example: managing mental health (up 2.11 points (1-10 scale)), identity and self-esteem (up 1.56 points), trust and hope (up 1.48 points), and self-care (up 1.35 points). The analysis of Personal Goal Scoring data (scored on 1-10 scale) showed significant increases on how close people were to achieving their goals. For all goals listed there was an average increase of 2.5 point from 3 to 5.5, showing that people made progress during their stay in the service.

Practical implications

Services provided by the third sector may offer an important contribution to support people's recovery and prevent admission to psychiatric hospital.

Originality/value

The findings of the evaluation study support a growing body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of services offering alternatives to admission, and they highlight the value of using recovery-oriented support planning and outcome capture tools in routine practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Nigel Thomas, David Pilgrim, Cathy Street and John Larsen

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the introduction of a voluntary sector pilot project to develop innovative mental health services for young people.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the introduction of a voluntary sector pilot project to develop innovative mental health services for young people.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of observation, interview and group discussion with service providers and users was used to build a picture of the relationships between context, mechanism and outcome.

Findings

The project was perceived as successful and beneficial in all three pilot sites, although there were differences of perception as to whether it complemented or challenged existing statutory services.

Practical implications

Learning about what adolescents and young adults with complex mental health needs find helpful may help to develop more appropriate and acceptable services. A mental health service for young people delivered by the voluntary sector offers the opportunity for radical service innovation. Synergy may be achieved as a result of statutory and voluntary sectors working together but the ethos of the voluntary service may challenge that of the statutory services.

Originality/value

The research is original in that it examines the process of introducing an innovative voluntary sector project into an existing traditional service framework.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Benjamin Gray, John Larsen and Alison Faulkner

The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial…

Abstract

Purpose

The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial intervention was designed to remedy that – focusing in particular on risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This paper describes how people with experience of using mental health services and carers contributed to the development of the PRIMROSE intervention. It draws out key messages for educators, researchers and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach the paper outlines how a Third sector organisation supported the study team in setting up a Lived Experience Advisory Panel (LEAP), drawing on a pre-existing model and recent thinking about service user and carer involvement in research. It is described how the approach sought to engage wider involvement of people with an interest in CVD while also offering more focused input into specifically the development of the trial intervention.

Findings –

An innovative approach was taken whereby a large LEAP, comprising 27 service users and carers, was supporting the development of the study mainly through e-mail and web updates and feedback, while a sub-group of the LEAP, with eight members, met three times and had a focus on inputting ideas into the development of the intervention. The creation of a LEAP proved helpful to the project, resulting in an enhanced and more relevant intervention – summed up in a series of eleven recommendations. Appointment of an independent chair of the sub-group proved invaluable and there is learning from this project for other similar initiatives.

Originality/value

This study has value for others who are developing practice interventions. A range of suggestions were made which will have relevance for training, ensuring that physical health issues are not ignored. There is much to learn too from the process of this project, for the involvement of service users and carers in research, education and in practice development.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2011

Karen J. Jansen and David A. Hofmann

In a series of studies, we develop and validate an approach to studying momentum fluctuations over the course of organizational change to better understand the dynamics of…

Abstract

In a series of studies, we develop and validate an approach to studying momentum fluctuations over the course of organizational change to better understand the dynamics of change processes. The first study experimentally examines momentum fluctuations in a controlled change context and explores individual predictors of variance in momentum. The second study utilizes a real organizational setting, examining organizationally relevant predictors of momentum variance and the ability of momentum trends to predict meaningful organizational outcomes. Combined results provide evidence that momentum mapping is a valid approach for researchers and managers exploring processes that unfold over time.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-022-3

Abstract

Details

Understanding Financial Risk Management, Second Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-794-3

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Bradford Lee Eden

58

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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