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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Stephen Weeks

Abstract

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Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Hannah Zeilig, Fiona Poland, Chris Fox and John Killick

The purpose of this paper is to outline the first stage of an innovative developmental study addressing the educational and emotional needs of dementia care home staff using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the first stage of an innovative developmental study addressing the educational and emotional needs of dementia care home staff using arts-based materials.

Design/methodology/approach

The arts workshop was developed using a mixed methods approach. This included ethnographic observation within a dementia care home, in-depth interviews with senior care home managers, a thematic analysis of focus groups and the development of a comic. At all stages, the multi-disciplinary project team collaborated closely with the care home staff. A comprehensive literature review of the policy, practice and academic background to dementia workforce education provided a contextual framework for the study. Perspectives from the medical humanities informed the project.

Findings

Despite the high prevalence of people living with dementia in care homes, there is a lack of appropriate training for the workforce that provides their care. This study found that an arts-based workshop offering an interactive mode of education was an effective way to engage this workforce. The workshop empowered participants to recognise their skills and focus on person-centred care; reflecting current recommendations for dementia care.

Research limitations/implications

The workshop was delivered in a single dementia care home and therefore findings may not be generalisable. In addition, the management did not take a direct part in the delivery of the workshop and therefore their views are not included in this study.

Practical implications

The arts-based approach can offer a means of engaging the dementia care workforce in education linked to their experience of caring.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the gap in relevant education for the dementia care workforce and outlines one possible way of addressing this gap using the arts.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Neil Mapes

This article explores the benefits of green exercise and open spaces for people living with dementia. These benefits are set within the existing general evidence base concerning…

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Abstract

This article explores the benefits of green exercise and open spaces for people living with dementia. These benefits are set within the existing general evidence base concerning well‐being and connection with nature. The scale of the social, economic and demographic challenges are outlined to enable potential opportunities to be identified. The benefits of green exercise, contact and connection with nature and open spaces for people with dementia and the current research gaps are identified. A case study of Dementia Adventure is highlighted, as are implications for practice.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Sonja Boon and Beth Pentney

In this chapter, we reflect on the possibilities of craftivism — yarn bombing, specifically — in a fourth-year undergraduate seminar on feminist praxis. We suggest that knitting…

Abstract

In this chapter, we reflect on the possibilities of craftivism — yarn bombing, specifically — in a fourth-year undergraduate seminar on feminist praxis. We suggest that knitting in the classroom, as an ‘everyday [act] of defiance’ (Baumgardner & Richards, 2000, p. 283), opens a productive space for complex and challenging conversations, in the process enabling not only different ways of listening, but also different ways of learning. Knitting, as a meditative and embodied practice, encourages and supports critical attentiveness. We also argue that craftivism can operate to make change in a way that emphasizes collaboration, non-violence and critical self-reflection. Social change, in a craftivist framework, happens in the everyday, and perhaps more radically, within the domestic spaces of the normatively feminine. Finally, our project demonstrated that knitting as feminist praxis serves a bridging function: we contend that systems of power may be challenged through knitting-as-protest, and that students may be able to practice engaged citizenship as they navigate the slippery borders between public and private, and academic and community-based feminisms.

Details

Global Currents in Gender and Feminisms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-484-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1975

MIKE PEARCE, KGE HARRIS, RONALD BENGE, MW HILL, A DUCKWORTH, MAUREEN DUFFY and MELVYN BARNES

IT WAS THE then Duke of Gloucester who, observing the said Mr Gibbon (of Roman Empire fame) writing, said, to quote as accurately as my reference source will allow, ‘Another…

Abstract

IT WAS THE then Duke of Gloucester who, observing the said Mr Gibbon (of Roman Empire fame) writing, said, to quote as accurately as my reference source will allow, ‘Another damned thick square book! Always scribble, scribble, scribble, scribble! Eh! Mr Gibbon!’

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2013

Jaime E. Gómez M.

Vernacular transformations of underused places give shape to Ephemeral Urban Dwellings (EUD). By reading the spatial patterns of use of three of these buildings, this paper…

Abstract

Vernacular transformations of underused places give shape to Ephemeral Urban Dwellings (EUD). By reading the spatial patterns of use of three of these buildings, this paper demonstrates that EUD replicate the way activities and ideas of privacy are related to space in the previous and permanent homes left behind by its inhabitants. The case studies are located in central areas of Bogotá and, although ephemeral, they have stayed for years. Personal interviews and mental maps drawn by the interviewees as well as on site drawings and photography by the author are the main sources of this study.

The paper recalls the processes of cultural appropriation that take place when people adjust to new cultural contexts. In the case of the dwellings studied, these processes give clues on how the ideas that shape the way people use space are translated into new places. The paper's conclusion calls for further research on EUD as an object of academic interest.

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Miriam Green and Tom Burns

The social, economic and political context of African societies in the wake of various European intrusions has set the scene for post‐independent western‐African relationships…

Abstract

The social, economic and political context of African societies in the wake of various European intrusions has set the scene for post‐independent western‐African relationships. The purpose of this paper is to examine the intentions and policies of developed countries and international agencies to the third world, using as an example a report evaluating aid to Mozambique. A textual analysis of the report will further explore the relationship between aid policies and western‐Mozambican relationships. It will be argued that however destructive pre‐independence relationships with colonial powers were for African societies, post‐colonial demands by western powers in return for aid were far more intrusive, requiring more total subversion of traditional economies to western neo‐liberal economic models.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Sarah Campbell, Nick Ponsillo, Paul Budd and John Keady

The purpose of this paper is to consider the work conducted by Manchester Camerata (an internationally renowned and world-class chamber orchestra) programme for people with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the work conducted by Manchester Camerata (an internationally renowned and world-class chamber orchestra) programme for people with dementia in one care home in the north west of England. The study aim was to undertake an exploratory qualitative evaluation of experiences of those taking part in its ten week “Music in Mind” programme, namely care home staff, Manchester Camerata musicians/organisational staff, care home activity workers, the assigned music therapist and visiting family carers.

Design/methodology/approach

During July-September 2014 a sample of 11 participants was recruited and a total of 19 interviews conducted over ten weeks. All respondents were offered the opportunity to be interviewed more than once. Interview data were supplemented by information gathered at two musicians de-brief sessions and from two activity workers’ diaries. All data was organised using NVivo 10 and thematic analysis applied to the whole data set. People with dementia could not be included in the sample owing to the time limitations on starting and completing the evaluation.

Findings

This analytical process generated three overarching themes: Making it Happen, which referred to the contextual, structural and organisational considerations necessary for setting up the engagement programme; Orchestrating Person-centred Care, which addressed the importance of building relationships through person to person communication; Making Musical Connections, which identified the sensory and embodied qualities of live music and the need to capture in-the-moment experiences.

Originality/value

Whilst each of these theme headings has slightly different meanings and applications to each of the participating stakeholders, the evaluation highlights the potential power of improvised music making to equalise and harmonise the group dynamics by co-creating “in-the-moment” experiences.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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