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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Stella Kladou and John Kehagias

This paper aims to investigate the structural relationships between the brand equity (BE) dimensions, when the fifth dimension of cultural brand assets is incorporated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the structural relationships between the brand equity (BE) dimensions, when the fifth dimension of cultural brand assets is incorporated. The paper seeks to establish and validate a five-dimensional BE measure for cultural urban destination, by comparing findings in two destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The structural model was tested from the perspective of 399 international tourists visiting Athens. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling analysis are used to test and validate an integrated BE model for cultural destinations. Findings are compared with respective ones in the case of Rome.

Findings

Findings reveal the significance of cultural brand assets for the BE of cultural urban destinations. Further, the study provides useful insight into the theory of reasoned action by investigating the structural relationships developed between BE dimensions and their impact on loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The study argues that the summative valence of associations, as described in the theory of reasoned action, can be applied in the case of a cultural destination as well. Research directions, including additional place brand dimensions, additional destinations, stakeholders groups or multi-group analysis, are advised to verify and generalise the application of the five-dimensional BE model.

Practical implications

Findings reveal those cultural brand assets which can help practitioners build up coherent and successful proprietary brand assets. Quality is a necessary pre-requisite to enhance loyalty. In the case of Athens, associations influence only indirect loyalty through their impact on quality.

Originality/value

This study offers to the limited literature concerning structural relationships developed among all five BE dimensions and consumer decision-making models in a tourism context. Moreover, the study contributes to the under-researched dimension of cultural brand assets.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Maria Salamoura, Vasilis Angelis, John Kehagias and Constantine Lymperopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the relationship between quality and accessibility, as selective influencing parameters of new product acceptance for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the relationship between quality and accessibility, as selective influencing parameters of new product acceptance for Greek, fast moving, and consumer products.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study come from a mail questionnaire sent to 680 executives operating in Greek enterprises, by using a combination of sampling criteria (advertising budget, turnover). Non‐parametric tests (Wilcoxon, Spearman, Kruskal‐Wallis and Pearson χ2) were used, together with descriptive measures to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that quality (usage/support) is a more important factor than Accessibility (economic/physical) in the formation of a “new product acceptance function”. Furthermore, usage quality is more important than support quality, while economic accessibility is more important than physical accessibility.

Research limitations/implications

The research limitations refer to the fact that the justification of the hypotheses in connection with the executive‐based approach followed has not been found to have any precedents. In addition, a multi, rather than single, source identification process was used for the new product acceptance factors.

Practical implications

For marketers, research of the conceptualization of the “acceptance function” acts as a basis for building a new products' marketing plan focused on the consumer, in a way which reflects the company characteristics, as well as the particular market conditions.

Originality/value

This paper is exploring new ground in that it isolates and examines the substitution between quality and accessibility as selective influencing parameters of acceptance for new fast moving consumer goods in Greece.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

John Kehagias, Emmanuel Skourtis and Aikaterini Vassilikopoulou

Using the product classification proposed by the Commodity School as it was originally expressed and later developed, this research aims to focus on defining pricing…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the product classification proposed by the Commodity School as it was originally expressed and later developed, this research aims to focus on defining pricing strategies for specific corporate objectives, that is, profit increase, market share increase, and prevention of new competitors from entering the market.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to investigate the relationship between four consumer product categories and alternative pricing strategies in light of various corporate objectives, a set of research questions and propositions was formed and tested on the basis of data reflecting opinions expressed by marketing executives through a mailed survey in Greece.

Findings

For convenience and preference products, the low‐price strategy is used more often, irrespective of corporate objectives, whereas the high‐price strategy is used more often, irrespective of corporate objectives, for specialty products. For shopping products, the low‐price strategy is used more often when the main corporate objectives are increased market share and the prevention of new competitors from entering the market, but when the main corporate objective is increased profits, the high‐price strategy tends to prevail.

Research limitations/implications

The current research could be further expanded to cover other related topics such as the pricing policies and specific pricing methods that are used in the four product categories in combination with the pricing strategies they relate to and serve.

Practical implications

For marketers, the development of the proposed framework can serve as a basis for pricing decisions, provided, of course, that they use research‐based information about the extent to which their products have the attributes of a certain product category.

Originality/value

As the literature review revealed, no conceptual links have been made between the three important parameters examined, that is, product categories, corporate objectives, and pricing strategies, that can form a pricing framework for consumer products. This research serves as a starting point for developing such a three‐point framework.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2015

Victoria Bellou, Irini Rigopoulou and John Kehagias

This paper aims to set out to add to extant knowledge by delineating the content of employer of choice (EOC) regardless of sector and shedding light on the role of gender…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to set out to add to extant knowledge by delineating the content of employer of choice (EOC) regardless of sector and shedding light on the role of gender in the EOC profile. Becoming an employer of choice (EOC) is a strategy that can help organizations manage current and prospective employee expectations of their employment relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses were gathered from 896 working adults. The questionnaire was developed by the researchers to reflect the employment experience. Parallel analysis and factor analysis were used to analyze the content of the EOC, and t-tests compares EOC factors between male and female individuals.

Findings

The results verify the multi-dimensionality of EOC and enrich its content. The most important facets of EOC for employees are the quality of workplace relationships, work prerequisites and satisfying work setting as the most important. With regards to how male and female employees perceive the EOC, both differences and similarities were found.

Research limitations/implications

Key limitations pertain to its cross-sectional design, the fact that gender is examined in isolation of other forms of identity that may interact with gender, and the fact that all respondents were Greek and white-collar.

Practical implications

The findings can support HR and marketing managers in their effort to attract talented individuals and retain and activate talented employees.

Originality/value

Existing evidence identifies the profile of EOCs within specific sectors, while we construct an EOC profile that crosses sector boundaries. Moreover, it is the first time that research into EOC takes gender into consideration in a structured way to offer a clearer understanding of what is valued by individuals.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Irini Rigopoulou and John Kehagias

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the empirical body of knowledge regarding the role of universities today. In addition, it aims to investigate the topic of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the empirical body of knowledge regarding the role of universities today. In addition, it aims to investigate the topic of personal development planning (PDP) programs, under a different perspective borrowed from marketing theory, namely, the “self‐brand orientation” approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focused on investigating the core research topics and parameters perceived to be important to students. The theoretical perspectives of PDPs and brand orientation served as conceptual bases, and both have been operationalised through the empirical study conducted.

Findings

The study findings reveal a “gap” between today's student needs and what the universities offer. “self‐brand oriented” management, seems to support the development of PDPs in a promising way, since the majority of the students claim that they are willing to participate in such a program.

Research limitations/implications

Because of sample limitations, the findings of the study are not generally applicable. Besides, the topics of PDPs remain unknown to the particular students, since they never had the opportunity to participate in such a program in the past.

Practical implications

This paper can be seen as a guiding work to new means of delivery of PDPs. It contributes to the dialogue under progress regarding the role of the Universities today and the ways by which PDPs will increase their future possibilities.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper is twofold: it meets students' needs as well as society's requests and allows marketing to make an ethical contribution to higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Cathy Parker and Gareth Roberts and Simon Quin

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available

Abstract

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Paul Gibbs

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Businesses have to react positively to big ideas and to new technology. They must also make up for lost time should they, initially, prove a bit slow off the mark in seeing the potential of technological breakthroughs.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Kyuho Lee, Stella Kladou, Ahmet Usakli and Yunxia Shi

The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of service quality on the formation of destination brand equity through customer satisfaction at a winery, from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of service quality on the formation of destination brand equity through customer satisfaction at a winery, from the perspective of Chinese wine tourists.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a survey research design. A convenience sample of 311 visitors to a major winery located in Yantai, China, was surveyed, and 265 useable questionnaires were analyzed. To analyze the data, the study used partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results of the study reveal that service quality at a winery is a significant determinant of winery satisfaction among Chinese wine tourists, which in turn affects the brand equity of a wine tourism destination.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the growing body of literature focusing on identity-based branding in the context of wine tourism. As such, this study brings together knowledge of a place branding dimension (i.e. destination brand equity), satisfaction and tourism experience at a winery.

Practical implications

The results suggest that the road to favorable assessments of a wine destination brand (macro level) go through a satisfying experience at a winery (micro level). Therefore, the need to co-create the wine experience through various stakeholders' involvement is crucial for the success of wine tourism.

Originality/value

Extant wine studies often highlight western wine tourists' behavior and examine central behavioral constructs such as winery service quality and satisfaction. This study extends previous research by: (1) investigating the issue from Chinese wine tourists' perspective and (2) integrating the destination brand equity of a wine region to current investigations that commonly focus on the service quality of a winery and wine tourists' satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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