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Article

John Kagochi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the link between inflation and the financial sector performance in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the link between inflation and the financial sector performance in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyzes the relationship between inflation and the financial sector performance for selected 22 Sub-Saharan countries from 1980 to 2013. The study used panel data and the dynamic panel generalized method of moments econometric method. The study concentrates on the link between inflation and the development of the banking sector.

Findings

The findings suggest that inflation does not promote financial sector development in SSA region while trade openness has a positive impact on the selected financial development indicators. Other variables that enhance financial development in SSA include government expenditure and good governance.

Practical implications

The main policy implication of the study is that in order for SSA countries to benefit from a deeper and more active financial sectors, the rates of inflation must be maintained low and be consistently under control. Also, for SSA region financial sectors to become deeper and more active it is crucial to develop stronger economic institutions including independent central banks and sound fiscal authorities.

Originality/value

The study differs from previous studies as it includes more (22) countries from SSA region while previous studies were either regional or country specific. The study also incorporates trade openness and the role of institutional quality in enhancing financial development. This differentiates the study from previous studies on the subject from the region.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Article

John M. Kagochi and Lesley M. Mace

The purpose of this paper is to analyze factors that determine the demand for single family houses in Alabama urbanized areas, commonly referred to as metropolitan…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze factors that determine the demand for single family houses in Alabama urbanized areas, commonly referred to as metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds and estimates a housing demand model that incorporates both macroeconomic and housing‐related variables using a panel time series data for 1988‐2007. The study is different from past research, which mainly focuses on housing demand at the state or national level, by looking at the factors influencing demand for housing at the MSAs level.

Findings

The study finds that demand for new single family houses in Alabama MSAs is influenced by both national economic factors and local factors. Population growth and increased sale of existing houses increase demand for new single family houses in the MSAs. On the contrary, increased cost of building a new house, higher real mortgage interest rates and unemployment rates are found to reduce the demand for new houses.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies that focus on housing demand at the local level, particularly in the US housing market. Since demand for housing will always be local and therefore influenced mostly by local conditions, the result reveal unique dynamics that are specific to the MSAs.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Article

Sydney Chikalipah

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of financial inclusion (FI) in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of financial inclusion (FI) in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the World Bank country-level data from 20 SSA countries for the year 2014.

Findings

The empirical findings in this study indicate that illiteracy is the major hindrance to FI in SSA. The findings provide useful information to government agencies and international development organisations. Also, the findings can help accelerate and strengthen FI strategies among SSA countries.

Research limitations/implications

Some countries were excluded from the final analysis due to lack of data.

Practical implications

In the last two decades, there has been renewed interest in fighting financial exclusion in Africa. Therefore, this study provide evidence which clearly shows that enhancing literacy levels in a country can immensely contribute towards building the financially inclusive societies in the SSA region.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study to empirically test the determinants of FI in SSA using the World Bank FI data set. Furthermore, this is the first attempt to estimate the determinants of FI with a combined data of SSA countries.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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Article

James Osei Mensah, Seth Etuah, Emmanuel Fiifi Musah, Frederick Botchwey, Loretta Oppong Adjei and Kofi Owusu

This study aims to analyse consumers' preferences for domestic chicken cut parts and the premium they are willing to pay for the various parts using data from a contingent…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse consumers' preferences for domestic chicken cut parts and the premium they are willing to pay for the various parts using data from a contingent valuation survey of individual chicken meat consumers in the Kumasi Metropolitan Area of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The willingness to pay premiums are obtained using the double-bounded dichotomous choice approach. Determinants of the consumers' willingness to pay amounts are identified through a multivariate Tobit regression analysis.

Findings

The study finds that the wing is the most preferred chicken part by the consumers followed by the thighs. All consumers who express interest in a particular domestic chicken cut part are willing to pay a premium. Age, sex, years of formal education, household size and income level of the consumers as well as convenience, product availability and perceived wholesomeness of the product are identified as the key factors that influence the willingness to pay amounts.

Research limitations/implications

The findings and recommendations of this study could serve as a guide to domestic poultry meat producers and investors in Ghana and other developing countries on how to process or package the meat for the market or consumers. This could further contribute to policy formulation regarding the development of the domestic poultry meat industry.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this study is seen in the contributions it makes to the literature on consumer preferences and willingness to pay for chicken cut parts from a developing country perspective where the market for these products is virtually non-existent.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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