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Case study
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Venugopal Gopalakrishna-Remani, John James Cater III and Jerry James Massey

This case study exercise highlights the importance of food supplier selection and forecasting to minimize food cost and maximize profit for a hotel restaurant. The…

Abstract

Synopsis

This case study exercise highlights the importance of food supplier selection and forecasting to minimize food cost and maximize profit for a hotel restaurant. The importance of data analytics in supplier selection is emphasized. The case exercise provides students with a more comprehensive understanding of spoilage and the calculation of food cost percentage, which should save the hotel restaurant under study significant dollars, help the environment, and strengthen the operation. The events described in this case are based on real world experiences.

Research methodology

This research uses a data driven problem-solving approach to accurately forecast food requirements and minimize spoilage.

Relevant courses and levels

Because of its focus on restaurant operations, the case exercise is appropriate for senior-level undergraduate courses or graduate courses in Operations Management, Restaurant Food and Beverage Management, Hotel Management, and Data Analytics.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

John James Cater, Marilyn Young and Keanon Alderson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contributions of both successors and incumbent leaders to family firm continuity, using insights from the family business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contributions of both successors and incumbent leaders to family firm continuity, using insights from the family business succession literature and cultural dimensions theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In a qualitative study, the succession practices of 19 Mexican-American family firms were examined.

Findings

The findings are encapsulated by seven propositions and a model of Mexican-American family firm generational contributions and constraints to family business continuity.

Originality/value

In-depth interviews with immigrant and second generation family firm leaders revealed both traditional family firm succession patterns and atypical succession patterns, including generational inversion and equals across generations.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

John James Cater

The purpose of this paper is to understand better the formation of an industry and the movement toward agglomeration by examining the development of the furniture…

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2698

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand better the formation of an industry and the movement toward agglomeration by examining the development of the furniture manufacturing industry of Western North Carolina and Virginia.

Design/methodology/approach

In this general review, the initiation and growth of the furniture industry is traced, applying the theory of agglomeration and noting isomorphic tendencies and the primacy of the search for legitimacy among constituents.

Findings

The paper finds first of all, the pioneering efforts of Thomas Wrenn in High Point brought the industry to the region. An initial wave of furniture manufacturers followed closely behind Wrenn as the industry gained legitimacy and status in North Carolina. Important elements in building the industry included the establishment of the Southern Furniture Manufacturers Association and the Southern Furniture Market in High Point. A second wave of furniture producers arrived on the scene after the First World War. This group benefited from cooperative actions of the survivors of the first wave and brought the Western North Carolina and Virginia area to the forefront of the furniture manufacturing industry in the USA. Finally, the paper comments on the current state of the industry in relation to the threat of foreign competition.

Originality/value

The furniture industry is not alone in the need to understand the impact of globalization. Practitioners and researchers alike should be aware of the costs to stakeholder groups, such as employees and local communities.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

John James Cater III and Brent Beal

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of family business owners in an externally induced crisis from a resource-based perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of family business owners in an externally induced crisis from a resource-based perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a qualitative case study approach involving 22 firms.

Findings

In the aftermath of the BP oil spill, a series of ripple effects impacted family firms both negatively and positively. The paper outlines five ways that family firms may improve company performance in crisis situations.

Research limitations/implications

Although our study is rich in qualitative detail, it is important to recognize that the BP oil spill represents a unique crisis context and caution should be exercised in generalizing the study's findings.

Practical implications

While ripple effects may be powerful at the industry and industry sub-group level, the paper provides evidence that family firms may overcome these external effects using one or more of five strategic initiatives: strong networking relationships, idiosyncratic local knowledge, flexibility, rapid response, and exercising trust with caution.

Originality/value

The study validates the potential utility of a ripple effect model in the study of family businesses and externally induced crises. It has the potential to contribute to improving management response.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2010

John James Cater and Robert T. Justis

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the development and implementation of shared leadership in multi‐generational family firms. Shared leadership or family…

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4016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the development and implementation of shared leadership in multi‐generational family firms. Shared leadership or family top management teams involve multiple family members in the top management and ownership of family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study approach was employed, using in‐depth interviews of the top managers of four family businesses. Each case was analyzed separately, and emergent themes found in each case; and then generalizations were made across the four cases in the cross‐case analysis.

Findings

Eight factors or conditions were examined that affect shared leadership in multi‐generational family firms according to the respondents – long‐term orientation, close communication and shared understanding, resistance to change, succession planning, failure to release control, reporting relationship confusion, increased decision time, and higher decision quality. The result of this study is the production of eight propositions to build theory concerning shared leadership, which is an under‐researched area for family business studies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is rich in qualitative detail, but with all such case study research, its limitations regarding sample size are recognized.

Practical implications

This paper views shared leadership as a growing phenomenon that incumbent family business leaders should consider as a viable alternative to primogeniture or the choice of a single successor.

Originality/value

The study described in this paper is groundbreaking in that it examines shared leadership or the development and implementation of top management teams in family firms in depth and detail. The paper contributes a balanced view of the implementation of shared leadership in family firms, exploring both the positive and negative aspects.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

John James Cater, Brent D. Beal and Lorna A. Collins

The purpose of this paper is to examine why social entrepreneurs in the USA choose to operate an entirely fair trade business and the factors that affect fair trade social…

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1121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why social entrepreneurs in the USA choose to operate an entirely fair trade business and the factors that affect fair trade social entrepreneurship. Fair trade seeks to benefit producers in developing countries by providing a market for their goods in developed countries. Fair trade enables all parties in the supply chain to make living wages and/or a profit.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative multiple case study approach of social entrepreneurs in 35 US fair trade companies, the authors develop a model and nine propositions to explain the findings.

Findings

The authors identify three primary motivational factors (ethical belief, religious faith, and business values), four contributory factors that strengthen fair trade engagement (family member involvement, the trend toward for profit status, industry professionalism, and consumer education), and three negative factors that work to discourage involvement (loss of identity, lack of industry consensus, and the shortage of retailers). The authors conclude by using the findings to consider the future of US fair trade social entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

The authors recognize limitations due to the sample size.

Practical implications

The authors believe that fair trade is worthy of further study and increased awareness.

Social implications

Increased awareness of fair trade may lead to better consumer buying decisions.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the development of theory in the study of fair trade, which has rarely been studied in the context of US social entrepreneurs.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

John James Cater

The purpose of this case study is to examine the impact of regional culture and family dynamics on firm survival and longevity. Secondary issues include operations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to examine the impact of regional culture and family dynamics on firm survival and longevity. Secondary issues include operations management in a retail grocery, hardware, and building supply store.

Design/methodology/approach

The author performed in‐depth qualitative interviews with the business owners and visited on site. The tape‐recorded interviews followed a formal list of questions, but were semi‐structured in nature.

Findings

Although the store was remotely located, wise management and intelligent leadership have contributed to business success and survival into the fourth generation of family ownership.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory qualitative case study, there are limitations concerning generalizability. Additionally, the findings here relate particularly to small family businesses.

Practical implications

Family firms possess a business side and a family side. In this case, success factors on the business side included merchandising skills, responsiveness to customer needs, profitable sales margins, and reinvestment in facilities. On the family side, success factors included harmonious relations among family members, the incumbent leaders’ desire for succession to occur, incumbent leaders’ financial forbearance or sacrifice, solid education of successors, mentoring of the next generation, and willing and able successors.

Originality/value

This case analyzed characteristics that lead to long term survival, examined the process of succession, and assessed the two‐sided nature – business side and family side – of a small family business.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property…

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26014

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

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15929

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Downloads
22733

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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