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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

John J. Withey

A national survey of small manufacturing businesses (fewer than 100 employees) reveals prevailing attitudes about doing business with public agencies. Respondents describe…

Abstract

A national survey of small manufacturing businesses (fewer than 100 employees) reveals prevailing attitudes about doing business with public agencies. Respondents describe a two tiered, nine variable model as representative of the public sector procurement process. Findings provide government agencies and private sector marketers with operational clues on what may help initiate and sustain procurement relationships with smaller suppliers.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

John J. Withey

Physical distribution organisations may be defined as organisational units whose duty is to administer economic activities that impact upon the flow of finished goods…

Abstract

Physical distribution organisations may be defined as organisational units whose duty is to administer economic activities that impact upon the flow of finished goods between points of production and consumption. Physical distribution components occupy a unique role in the organisation. Their mission has been defined as “getting the right assortment of materials to the right location in an efficient manner timely to marketing and manufacturing requirements”. To accomplish this mission there must be continual interaction between suppliers of materials and receivers of materials. Material suppliers can be thought of as the rest of the organisation of which the physical distribution component is a part, primarily the production or manufacturing component. Receivers of materials are the organisation's customers or distribution points. The physical distribution organisation, by virtue of the activities it performs, must deal with both the internal suppliers and the external receivers.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

John J. Withey

Deals with the structural problem of how to allocate work to sub‐units or departments within physical distribution organizations. Asks what bases or criteria should be…

Abstract

Deals with the structural problem of how to allocate work to sub‐units or departments within physical distribution organizations. Asks what bases or criteria should be followed in assigning duties to the various parts of physical distribution structures. Concludes with managerial implications.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Ali R. Malekzadeh and Samuel Rabino

In this empirical study, export strategies of 131 California exporting manufacturers were examined. A factor analysis of fifty variables yielded five factors which were…

Abstract

In this empirical study, export strategies of 131 California exporting manufacturers were examined. A factor analysis of fifty variables yielded five factors which were analysed subsequently through multiple discriminant analysis. Two of the five factors, strategic planning and export strategies, were found to be meaningful in discriminating between small and large exporters. Implications for managers are offered.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Robert E. Morgan

The extent of national export volume attributable to the small firm sector within the UK does not compare favourably with that of certain other European countries…

Abstract

The extent of national export volume attributable to the small firm sector within the UK does not compare favourably with that of certain other European countries/ particularly Germany and Italy. In an attempt to enhance the export competitiveness of this firm sector recent policy, research and management attention has been devoted to influences underlying export development. This article contributes to this knowledge by reviewing extensive research studies that have reported on one aspect of this topic: the international orientation of the decision maker within the small firm.

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2012

Lung Hung Chen, Mei-Yen Chen, Yun-Ci Ye, I-Wu Tung, Chih-Fu Cheng and Shen Tung

The aim of this study was to integrate the hierarchical model of the perceived service quality (PSQ) theory with the bottom-up theory of satisfaction. It was hypothesised…

Abstract

The aim of this study was to integrate the hierarchical model of the perceived service quality (PSQ) theory with the bottom-up theory of satisfaction. It was hypothesised that satisfaction with sporting events would mediate the relationship between PSQ and life satisfaction. Study 1 was conducted to translate the Perceived Service Quality questionnaire (PSQQ) (Brady & Cronin, 2011) into Chinese and to validate it for sporting events. Study 2 was conducted to examine the main hypothesis. The results indicated that satisfaction-withevent partially mediated the relationship between PSQ and life satisfaction. The results are discussed in terms of both the examined theories.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Brian Tjemkes and Olivier Furrer

Strategic alliances involve uncertainty, interdependence, and vulnerability, which often create adverse situations. This paper seeks to understand how alliance managers…

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic alliances involve uncertainty, interdependence, and vulnerability, which often create adverse situations. This paper seeks to understand how alliance managers respond to these adverse situations by examining the influence of four exchange variables on response strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario‐based experiment provides empirical support for a typology consisting of seven conceptually and empirically distinct response strategies: exit, opportunism, aggressive voice, creative voice, considerate voice, patience, and neglect.

Findings

The results indicate that economic satisfaction, social satisfaction, alliance‐specific investments, and the availability of attractive alternatives differentially and interactively affect response strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers two main contributions to alliance literature. First, the seven response strategies accurately represent reactions that alliance managers use to deal with adverse situations. Second, the study findings validate and extend previous alliance research by highlighting that a comprehensive response strategy typology is necessary to disentangle the effects of the four exchange conditions on response strategy use, which fosters theory development and managers' ability to manage their alliances effectively.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the process perspective on strategic alliances by highlighting the various response strategies that alliance managers use to deal with adverse situations and their antecedents.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Ted W. Legatski, John Cresson and Anne Davey

While profitability improved for a sample of 260 downscaling firms in 46 industries, productivity declined dramatically. We propose and critically examine five competing…

Abstract

While profitability improved for a sample of 260 downscaling firms in 46 industries, productivity declined dramatically. We propose and critically examine five competing hypotheses to explain these findings: (1) learning curve effects associated with new technologies; (2) experience curve effects associated with the introduction of new products or entering new markets; (3) systemic problems within the firm; (4) unexpected loss of more productive employees, and (5) reduced commitment among remaining employees.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Barbara S. White, Bruce I. Davidson and Zoe Cullen

Schein (1985) defines a career anchor as a person's perceived area of competence, values, and motives that he or she would not want to forfeit when faced with a career…

Abstract

Schein (1985) defines a career anchor as a person's perceived area of competence, values, and motives that he or she would not want to forfeit when faced with a career decision that might prevent him or her from fulfilling it. Hardin, Stocks and Graves (2001) utilized Schein's Career Orientation Inventory to determine the predominant career anchors of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) and to investigate the relationship of CPA career anchor and job setting. This chapter builds on the Hardin et al. study and focuses on the younger professional accountant. This younger generation of accountants are part of the millennial generation, which prior research has indicated vary significantly in their wants, values, and desires for an employment situation. Based on the survey results, 46.1% of the millennials possess a Lifestyle career anchor, 18.0% possess a Security career anchor, and 12.4% possess a Service career anchor. Each of the other five career anchors were selected by fewer than 8.0% of the respondents. The results suggest the career anchors of today's millennial professional accountants differ from those of professional accountants some 15 years ago. In particular, the Security career anchor is far more prevalent than in the past, which suggests millennial accountants have an increased interest in job security. This research provides important information to organizations seeking to recruit and retain young accounting professionals. Similarly, young professionals should be aware of their career anchor, so they can manage their career choices, rather than conform to choices that others make for them.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-402-1

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