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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Jessica Babin and John Hulland

Some consumers are engaged in online curation, a type of user-generated content, in ways that can be impactful for brands. An example of online curation includes…

Abstract

Purpose

Some consumers are engaged in online curation, a type of user-generated content, in ways that can be impactful for brands. An example of online curation includes organizing themed collections of product images on Pinterest. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework of online consumer curation, introducing this topic to the marketing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the analysis of the business and academic literature, as well as a careful study of many examples of online consumer curation, the authors present a framework for understanding online consumer curation.

Findings

The actions taken by online consumer curators are similar to those of museum or art gallery curators: acquiring, selecting, organizing and displaying content for an audience. The motivations for consumers to engage in online curation include building/displaying their identities and making social connections with their online audience. One outcome possible for the audience that views the curation is gaining access to carefully selected and recommended content.

Research limitations/implications

As online consumer curation is a new area of research, the authors suggest several marketing- and brand-relevant propositions that can be addressed in future research.

Practical implications

As consumers are frequently using product images and brand symbols in their online curation, it is important for marketing academics and practitioners to understand their actions.

Originality/value

The aim of the paper is to present a thorough introduction to the idea of online consumer curation by outlining relevant examples, providing a framework for understanding this activity and its implications for brand management, and listing ideas for future research.

Propósito

Algunos consumidores se dedican a la “curación” en línea, un tipo de contenido generado por el usuario (UGC), de manera que pueden ser impactantes para las marcas. Un ejemplo de “curación” en línea incluye la organización de colecciones temáticas de imágenes de productos en Pinterest. El propósito de esta investigación es presentar un marco sobre la “curación” del consumidor en línea, introduciendo este tema en la literatura de marketing.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

A través de nuestro análisis de la literatura académica y empresarial, así como del estudio cuidadoso de muchos ejemplos de “curación” de los consumidores en línea, presentamos un marco para comprender la “curación” de los consumidores en línea.

Hallazgos

Las acciones realizadas por los “curadores” son similares a las de sus homólogos en museos o galerías de arte: adquirir, seleccionar, organizar y mostrar contenido para una audiencia. Las motivaciones para que los consumidores participen en la “curación” en línea incluyen construir/mostrar sus identidades y establecer conexiones sociales con su audiencia en línea. Un resultado posible para la audiencia que ve la “curación” es obtener acceso a contenido cuidadosamente seleccionado y recomendado.

Implicaciones teóricas

Como la “curación” en línea es una nueva área de investigación, sugerimos varias propuestas relevantes de marketing y marca que pueden abordarse en futuras investigaciones.

Implicaciones prácticas

Como los consumidores utilizan con frecuencia imágenes de productos y símbolos de marca en su “curación” en línea, es importante que los académicos y profesionales de marketing comprendan sus acciones.

Originalidad/valor

La investigación presenta una introducción exhaustiva a la idea de la “curación” del consumidor en línea describiendo ejemplos relevantes, proporcionando un marco para comprender esta actividad y sus implicaciones para la gestión de la marca, y enumerando ideas para futuras investigaciones.

Palabras clave

“Curación” del consumidor en línea, Comportamiento del consumidor en línea, Contenido generado por el usuario, Gestión de marca

Details

Spanish Journal of Marketing - ESIC, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-9709

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Casey E. Newmeyer, Efua Obeng and John Hulland

Drawing on the brand alliance, cause marketing and corporate social responsibility literatures, the authors introduce the notion of international cause alliances. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the brand alliance, cause marketing and corporate social responsibility literatures, the authors introduce the notion of international cause alliances. The authors conceptualize international cause alliances as strategic partnerships between international causes and for-profit companies with the stated purpose of raising funds for the cause. Beyond signaling that companies are socially responsible, international cause alliances may also help companies increase brand awareness or expand into new markets. Because international cause alliances take many forms and differ in the extent to which the brands are integrated, they have very different strategic implications. The purpose of this paper is to discuss these implications in a framework as well as providing managerial direction for both for-profit companies and causes when forming such alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

Using literature on brand alliances, cause marketing, and corporate social responsibility as a foundation, the authors introduce the notion of international cause alliances. The authors review literature to understand the many forms of alliances and investigate the extent to which brands are integrated. The authors then use these implications to develop a framework that can guide managerial decision-making for both for-profit companies and causes when forming such alliances.

Findings

The research suggests that to effectively develop international cause alliances, the organization involved must be aware of the challenges and potential benefits that these partnerships produce. For instance, while highly integrated alliances involve large resource commitments they also facilitate brand image spillover. As such, these alliances are a great way for companies to alter customers’ perceptions of their brands. Alternatively, low integration alliances require fewer resources and facilitate market expansion.

Research limitations/implications

This research identifies strategies that companies and causes can use to either expand their markets or alter customers’ perceptions of their brands.

Originality/value

This paper presents a framework that companies and causes can use when forming international cause alliances.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Yujie Wei

This paper studies how Chinese consumers respond to foreign goods in the post‐WTO era. Specifically, it examines brand sensitivity as a mediator and product cues as…

Abstract

This paper studies how Chinese consumers respond to foreign goods in the post‐WTO era. Specifically, it examines brand sensitivity as a mediator and product cues as moderator of purchase intention. Additionally, it examines consumer preferences for different products and consumption plans for the subsequent five years. The survey sample is drawn from a population of foreign product users from 34 cities in 18 provinces in China. Results provide evidence that brand sensitivity mediates the relationship between consumer ethnocentrism and purchase intention; product cues moderate the effect of ethnocentrism on purchase intention. As the first study to link consumer ethnocentrism directly to brand sensitivity and purchase intention, this research provides some managerial implications. Global marketers can offset the negative effect of ethnocentrism by emphasizing brand image of its products, taking advantage of specific product cues, or by providing more comprehensive after‐sale service to reduce the perceived risk of purchasing imports. Also, price is still a hurdle that prevents Chinese consumers from mass consumption of foreign products. Global firms should not overestimate the purchasing power of Chinese consumers. This study represents a “snapshot” of Chinese consumers’ decision making at a time when their economic system is undergoing rapid change.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Christopher R. Plouffe, Mark Vandenbosch and John Hulland

For more than a decade, bankers and others outside the financial services community such as hardware manufacturers have sought to solidify the place of smart card…

Abstract

For more than a decade, bankers and others outside the financial services community such as hardware manufacturers have sought to solidify the place of smart card technology as a viable retail point‐of‐sale alternative and, more boldly, as an outright replacement for cash in everyday consumption situations around the globe. Despite strong development efforts and numerous fact‐finding market trials, many banks have found smart card technology to be a losing proposition. This article presents a detailed case study of both consumer and merchant adoption of one smart card‐based retail point‐of‐sale system. The system, called “Exact”, was test marketed for a full year in the Canadian market. Various perceptual and demographic data from consumers as well as firm‐level data from retailers are both presented and assessed. The ensuing discussion offers pragmatic suggestions for those in the financial services community as to how the apparent difficulties and shortcomings of smart card technology may be overcome.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

The most significant event for the School has been the announcement of the creation of the National Centre for Management Research and Development. The Centre is due to…

Abstract

The most significant event for the School has been the announcement of the creation of the National Centre for Management Research and Development. The Centre is due to open in 1986 and will provide research facilities for up to 20 major projects designed to improve the competitiveness of Canadian business practices.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Demetris Vrontis and Alkis Thrassou

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Indrajit Goswami and Nigel Raylyn Dsilva

Employee stress and job satisfaction are significant issues in the hospitality industry. Moreover, employee stress has cost implications on the stakeholders, i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee stress and job satisfaction are significant issues in the hospitality industry. Moreover, employee stress has cost implications on the stakeholders, i.e. employers and employees alike. There is inadequate empirical evidence that could shed light on job stress and burnout issues of hotel employees with reference to India. Also, the nature and level of hospitality employee stress is not fully understood. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of job satisfaction and job stress on the life of employees in the hospitality sector in Mumbai.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a total of 510 respondents (23 for inductive and 487 for the deductive study) from six five-star category hotels in Mumbai. It utilizes a sequential mixed-method approach to measures the study variables through phenomenography and then validates their causal relationship through partial least squares structural equation modeling using Smart PLS-SEM.

Findings

In the inductive analysis it was found that “work related” factors such as unsafe working conditions, work load, relationship on the job were the most prominent sources of stress for the respondents. In the deductive analysis the causal relationship between job satisfaction, job stress and stress impact verified through Smart PLS-SEM turned out to be significant. It could be inferred from the results that job satisfaction negatively influences job stress and job impact. Similarly, job stress positively influenced stress impact among the hotel employees.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the current study should be interpreted with caution. First, the current study only includes self-reporting stress levels. Direct observation was not feasible, since it is subjected to the researchers’ bias. The sample in this study did not include employees of limited-service hotels. As limited-service hotels may have different requirements, challenges and culture for employees than full-service or five stared hotels, thus the findings of the study may not be generalized to limited service hotels.

Practical implications

The study has dual implications. First, similar research interventions through the mixed-method approach must study the causal relationship between job satisfaction, job stress and stress impact by effectively exploring the participants “lived experience.” Second, employers must validate customer feedback to evaluate employee job performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore interrelationships between the three important variables, namely, employees’ job satisfaction, job stress and its impact on the life of employees in the hospitality industry using the sequential mixed-method approach. The study findings open new avenues for future research using structural equation modeling, thus representing an important contribution of the present study.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2019

Xiaodan Pan, Martin Dresner and Yurong Xie

Drawing on the resource-based view and resource complementarity theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate two research questions: To what extent are logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the resource-based view and resource complementarity theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate two research questions: To what extent are logistics information system (IS) resources associated with improved operational performance? And to what extent are these relationships contingent on organizational factors?

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model with a nested structure is presented to link logistics IS resources and organizational factors with operational performance. The findings are validated using a cross-sectional sample of secondary data from domestic logistics firms in China.

Findings

This paper extends existing operational-level measures for logistics IS resources into a three-tier tactical-level typology: inside-out resources (operation-focused IS, decision-focused IS and IS development capability); outside-in resources (relation-focused IS and market-focused IS); and spanning resources (IS integration capability and IS management capability). Though logistics IS resources, in general, are positively related to operational performance, inside-out IS resources have the most significant impact. Organizational factors, such as firm size, firm age and firm ownership, may enhance or suppress the effects of logistics IS resources on performance.

Practical implications

The findings are valuable to both logistics firms and buyer firms in an emerging market, as logistics IS resources may affect costs and quality of logistics service. The tactical-level typology allows logistics firms to better plan for and manage emerging IS resources in a competitive environment.

Originality/value

This paper extends prior work regarding the complementary effects of logistics IS resources and organizational factors on operational performance. Logistics firms should carefully manage the three types of tactical-level IS resources according to their organizational environment to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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