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Abstract

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-624-3

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

John S. Hill

China has become a driving force in the world economy, yet East‐West cultural differences remain a problem area for many managers. This paper examines the importance of…

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Abstract

China has become a driving force in the world economy, yet East‐West cultural differences remain a problem area for many managers. This paper examines the importance of Confucianism in shaping societal values in China and how these values have affected the Chinese style of management. Confucian principles are extracted from the extant literature and used to explain the cultural underpinnings of Chinese leadership patterns, interpersonal behaviors and individual values. The longevity of Confucian influences throughout Chinese culture is a major factor in China’s resistance to Western management practices. There is also evidence that mainstream Confucian principles emphasizing teamwork, relationships and strong corporate cultures are gaining traction in the West. Future Western researchers should pay increased attention to East Asian philosophies and Asian‐based religions in their attempts to understand non‐Christian lifestyles and management methods.

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Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

John F. Hill

The need to make forecasts is commonplace in industry. The accuracy (and hence, usefulness) of forecasts varies from one sector to another, but is rarely high. Describes…

805

Abstract

The need to make forecasts is commonplace in industry. The accuracy (and hence, usefulness) of forecasts varies from one sector to another, but is rarely high. Describes an approach to the monitoring of forecasts which aims to detect significant inaccuracy and to quantify the correction(s) that need to be made, based on well‐established methods of SPC, and so it also allows any changes in the pattern of demand to be detected, providing information for the revision of the forecasting model. Since the monitoring technique is based on statistical methods, it provides information which can be used directly in conventional models for inventory management. The user can choose the level of coverage required, and the monitoring technique indicates how well the target is being met. Again, any departure from the required level can be indicated at a stage early enough to take corrective action.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Donald G. Howard and Michael A. Mayo

The article suggests that product management techniques commonly employed for markets in developed countries are inappropriate for markets in less‐developed countries…

Abstract

The article suggests that product management techniques commonly employed for markets in developed countries are inappropriate for markets in less‐developed countries (LDCs). To market successfully in LDCs, a firm must re‐examine both its product offerings and its product management philosophy.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Mike Rix and Jeff Gold

This article reports on a visit by a small group of SME managers from Barnsley and Doncaster in the UK to the USA. The aim of the project, entitled Networking USA, was to…

410

Abstract

This article reports on a visit by a small group of SME managers from Barnsley and Doncaster in the UK to the USA. The aim of the project, entitled Networking USA, was to learn from US managers’ experiences of recovery and regeneration. Details of the preparation for the visit and the overall objectives are given, as well as a description of the main activities. Apart from business benefits which were recorded in the evaluation, the main benefit has been the construction of a learning network among the managers with continued links to US companies. The paper concludes with some issues and implications for SME management development research and policy.

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Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Michel Desbordes

174

Abstract

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1899

In its passage through the Grand Committee the Food Bill is being amended in a number of important particulars, and it is in the highest degree satisfactory that so much…

Abstract

In its passage through the Grand Committee the Food Bill is being amended in a number of important particulars, and it is in the highest degree satisfactory that so much interest has been taken in the measure by members on both sides of the House as to lead to full and free discussion. Sir Charles Cameron, Mr. Kearley, Mr. Strachey, and other members have rendered excellent service by the introduction of various amendments; and Sir Charles Cameron is especially to be congratulated upon the success which has attended his efforts to induce the Committee to accept a number of alterations the wisdom of which cannot be doubted. The provision whereby local authorities will be compelled to appoint Public Analysts, and compelled to put the Acts in force in a proper manner, and the requirement that analysts shall furnish proofs of competence of a satisfactory character to the Local Government Board, will, it cannot be doubted, be productive of good results. The fact that the Local Government Board is to be given joint authority with the Board of Agriculture in insuring that the Acts are enforced is also an amendment of considerable importance, while other amendments upon what may perhaps be regarded as secondary points unquestionably trend in the right direction. It is, however, a matter for regret that the Government have not seen their way to introduce a decisive provision with regard to the use of preservatives, or to accept an effective amendment on this point. Under existing circumstances it should be plain that the right course to follow in regard to preservatives is to insist on full and adequate disclosure of their presence and of the amounts in which they are present. It is also a matter for regret that the Government have declined to give effect to the recommendation of the Food Products Committee as to the formation of an independent and representative Court of Reference. It is true that the Board of Agriculture are to make regulations in reference to standards, after consultation with experts or such inquiry as they think fit, and that such inquiries as the Board may make will be in the nature of consultations of some kind with a committee to be appointed by the Board. There is little doubt, however, that such a committee would probably be controlled by the Somerset House Department; and as we have already pointed out, however conscientious the personnel of this Department may be—and its conscientiousness cannot be doubted—it is not desirable in the public interest that any single purely analytical institution should exercise a controlling influence in the administration of the Acts. What is required is a Court of Reference which shall be so constituted as to command the confidence of the traders who are affected by the law as well as of all those who are concerned in its application. Further comment upon the proposed legislation must be reserved until the amended Bill is laid before the House.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2022

Gavin Foster, John Robertson, Sophia Pallis and Jose Segal

To improve outcomes for people with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, the Eastern Health Mental Health Service implemented an integrated treatment…

Abstract

Purpose

To improve outcomes for people with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, the Eastern Health Mental Health Service implemented an integrated treatment model known as the dual diagnosis clinician shared care model. This study aims to provide evidence for a relatively unexplored model in clinical mental health services within the state of Victoria, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Dual diagnosis clinicians were placed into community mental health clinics in a shared-care, modified case management role, to provide primary and secondary consultations to select consumers and/or their carers, as well as to provide capacity-building training to the mental health staff facing real world clinical challenges in dual diagnosis service delivery.

Findings

Since the commencement of this service, more than 800 consumers of the adult mental health service have been supported to concurrently address their harmful substance use, while receiving recovery-focused community mental health care. Preliminary findings include previously unknown figures on the prevalence for co-occurring substance use at the point of referral and a demonstrated preference by consumers for treatment of both disorders at the same time by the same service (in-house treatment).

Originality/value

The establishment of a dedicated, integrated dual diagnosis team has significantly increased the capacity of a community-based clinical mental health service to engage with and treat consumers with dual diagnosis disorders. This model is beginning to produce evidence challenging traditional siloed approaches to mental health and alcohol and drug treatment.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Frank B. Tipton

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of culture in international business studies, viewed from the perspective of textbooks in the field.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of culture in international business studies, viewed from the perspective of textbooks in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses the separate chapters on the role of culture in 19 survey texts in international business at three levels: factual assertions; social and historical interpretations; and application of general theories.

Findings

Although all textbooks in international business emphasize the importance of culture, the survey reveals serious weaknesses at all three levels, including straightforward errors of fact, more subtle errors of interpretation, and serious problems with definitions and application of theories of cultural difference. The weaknesses are strikingly consistent, and the paper examines a range of possible common causes. Imbricated in the professional structures of the field, the authors appear to be under pressure from publishers, they share a US‐centred bias, and they appear professionally isolated.

Originality/value

Parallel to theories of nationalism and some postcolonial theorists, it can be argued that the implicit purpose of the texts is not to engage sympathetically with actual cultural differences, but rather to mould the next generation of American managers into a common pattern, by identifying an exotic cultural Other against which students will form their new identity. One of the consequences is that it does not matter greatly to the authors whether other cultures are presented accurately, or not. In practical terms, however, cultural differences are important and are recognized as such in international business studies, and so there is reason to hope that the texts will be improved.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1983

John Teire

In the first of these two articles, John Teire, a training and development consultant, described the reasoning behind the course he helped design for Plessey at Beeston…

Abstract

In the first of these two articles, John Teire, a training and development consultant, described the reasoning behind the course he helped design for Plessey at Beeston. And Steve and Larry, managers on the course who had both kept diaries, gave their accounts of the experience from the inside. It is now Wednesday morning of the course and a new day. Steve and Larry continue with their stories.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 15 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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