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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Robert A. Musiala Jr., John J. Harrington, Teresa Goody Guillén, Jonathan A. Forman, Adam D. Gale and Veronica Reynolds

To discuss and analyze the facts and circumstances of the October 11, 2019 U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York temporary restraining order halting…

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss and analyze the facts and circumstances of the October 11, 2019 U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York temporary restraining order halting the distribution of cryptocurrency tokens in SEC v. Telegram Group Inc.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an overview of the case, an analysis of the Court’s ruling, details on the final resolutions, and some key takeaways.

Findings

Given the lack of judicial precedent in this area, as well as the size and profile of the Telegram project, the Telegram case was closely watched by blockchain industry participants and represents a significant development for this emerging market. The Telegram court’s approach, if broadly adopted, could prove very challenging for those attempting to launch decentralized networks involving blockchain-based tokens.

Practical implications

The Telegram case represents just one court’s view and is based on a very fact-specific inquiry. However, given the Court’s apparent deference to the SEC’s positions on the facts at hand, and the lack of judicial precedent in this area, the blockchain industry should pay close attention to this decision.

Originality/value

Expert guidance from lawyers with extensive experience in blockchain technologies, digital currencies, securities offerings and litigation, investment funds and financial services.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

John J. O'Flaherty

EURILIA, which is part of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) Libraries Programme, aims to enhance the libraries' research, development and education process…

Abstract

EURILIA, which is part of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) Libraries Programme, aims to enhance the libraries' research, development and education process which underpins the aerospace sector by establishing a new service based on a standardised pan‐European system for information access, retrieval, image browsing and document delivery. This will, in turn, extend the access and availability of major aerospace collections. The paper outlines work undertaken on the information needs of aerospace engineers and scientists. Also the development of the EURILIA system for OPAC searching and document delivery is described.

Details

Program, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Simon J. Bevan and John Harrington

An increasing number of organisations are taking advantage of technologies such as fax, E‐mail and image scanning in order to enter the document supply arena. This…

Abstract

An increasing number of organisations are taking advantage of technologies such as fax, E‐mail and image scanning in order to enter the document supply arena. This competition is focused on a move towards the provision of documents to the end user. Currently electronic table of contents/document ordering services which are very active in this area tend towards the premium end of the spectrum for many libraries.

Details

Program, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Simon Bevan, John Harrington and Hazel Woodward

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Ilse B. Moon

Once a taboo subject, death and dying has been considered not only a possible but a healthy topic of discussion since the pioneering work of Dr. Elizabeth Kübler‐Ross with…

Abstract

Once a taboo subject, death and dying has been considered not only a possible but a healthy topic of discussion since the pioneering work of Dr. Elizabeth Kübler‐Ross with dying patients in Chicago beginning in 1965. Since then, the widely publicized court case of the comatose young Karen Ann Quinlan, the growth of the hospice movement, and the rise of groups asserting a person's right to choose the moment and manner of death rather than undergo the prolonged suffering of terminal illness have fueled public interest. Media attention reflects this increasing public awareness—the popular 60 Minutes televised interviews with both hospice people and supporters of the right‐to‐die; a “Dear Abby” newspaper column drew over 40,000 requests to the Society for the Right to Die for information on living wills.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

John Blagden

Explores how the national aspiration of “universal access” to information compares with what is actually happening in practice. Outlines some of the issues which emerge in…

Abstract

Explores how the national aspiration of “universal access” to information compares with what is actually happening in practice. Outlines some of the issues which emerge in the debate over access versus holdings, and presents some data from Cranfield University to shed some light on it.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Janet Evans, Simon J. Bevan and John Harrington

Explains the background, context and operation of the Cranfield University Library BIODOC Research Project which explores key issues in the access versus journal holdings…

Abstract

Explains the background, context and operation of the Cranfield University Library BIODOC Research Project which explores key issues in the access versus journal holdings debate. Hopes to test whether an access model of provision in certain circumstances provides more cost effective and appropriate information support than the traditional in‐house collection. The project involves the cancellation of all the library journal subscriptions for the Biotechnology Centre and their replacement by the UnCover Reveal current contents service and as document supply from a number of sources. Describes the factors such as rising periodical costs, availability of new electronic document delivery services, increasing use of e‐mail by academics that led to the experiment; and the reasons for the selection of the Biotechnology Centre as an appropriate partner. Describes the project management and everyday operation of the project and the design of the project to include data collection for evaluation. Includes consideration of the issue of copyright.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

A mobile sentry only 54cm tall has been designed by Sandia Laboratories with US government support, to patrol high‐security buildings.

Abstract

A mobile sentry only 54cm tall has been designed by Sandia Laboratories with US government support, to patrol high‐security buildings.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Abstract

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The Political Economy of Antitrust
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-093-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Glyn Rowland

Discusses the basic concepts of intellectual property, particularly as applied to patents; explains the monopoly granted to inventors in return for disclosing details of…

Abstract

Discusses the basic concepts of intellectual property, particularly as applied to patents; explains the monopoly granted to inventors in return for disclosing details of their inventions in applications for patent specifications. Expands on the problems such a system presents to the inventor, with comments on decisions the inventor must take on whether to patent his invention, and if so, where, and how the procedures should be approached. Presents a brief history of patents, with an explanation of what can and what cannot be patented under the Patents Act 1977. Notes arrangements for protection outside the UK ‐ through the European Patent Office, and other countries of the world. Discusses the main factors which affect the information value of patents, and comments on the major patent information tools ‐ printed, CD‐ROM and databases. Concludes with a brief discussion on the growing impact of the Internet and the World Wide Web, suggesting that such developments might increase the use of the valuable information contained in patent documentation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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