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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1981

John Haag

Few thoughtful men or women will deny, as we enter the last two decades of the twentieth century, that ours is truly an Age of Anxiety. Even in an America still uniquely…

Abstract

Few thoughtful men or women will deny, as we enter the last two decades of the twentieth century, that ours is truly an Age of Anxiety. Even in an America still uniquely stable and prosperous relative to much of the rest of the world, the general mood is no longer an optimistic one. For many of us the future appears clouded at best, perhaps laden with catastrophes. Clearly all of us are witnesses to, and in some cases participants in, a great turning point in human affairs. We thus find ourselves living in the end of one epoch while at the same time the rough outlines of a new civilisation come into view. Such momentous transformations of the social structure, economy and political landscape are invariably accompanied by, and often preceded by, major shifts of intellectual commitment. In other words, as our world has changed drastically in the twentieth century, basic patterns of thought and philosophical orientation have either reflected, or in some cases even helped to initiate, these changes. In the brief space allotted to us, we will attempt to present a sketch of the most important of these shifts in thought, always keeping in mind that because of the fact that we find ourselves in media res, these observations can be little more than fragmentary perceptions of a reality that has itself not yet been finalised.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Hendrik Haag and Daniel Weiβ

Bonds governed under German law would normally not contain collective action clauses, ie provisions dealing with majority decisions by bondholders by which certain bond…

Abstract

Bonds governed under German law would normally not contain collective action clauses, ie provisions dealing with majority decisions by bondholders by which certain bond terms may be altered or waived. This is because it is uncertain whether, in the absence of a statutory basis, a decision taken by a majority of bondholders would be binding upon a dissenting minority. For certain circumstances, however, a statutory basis exists in the form of a law enacted in 1899 which, during the last decades, has been very rarely used. This paper discusses in what cases the law may be invoked, what decisions can be made by bondholders and what procedural requirements must be observed for getting to a binding and unchallengeable decision.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Lisa H. Matherson and Sydney Armour Haag

The purpose of this notable trade book lesson plan is to utilize the novel, Ghost Boys, in an upper elementary/middle school education application. This lesson plan…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this notable trade book lesson plan is to utilize the novel, Ghost Boys, in an upper elementary/middle school education application. This lesson plan utilizes visual curriculum materials to engage students in a powerful exploration of “bearing witness.” Through the exploration of text, photographs, music and dance, students will be given opportunities to engage with the visual materials, think critically about relevant societal issues and participate in affective learning. The students will interpret visual historical evidence to develop “a sense of otherness” or empathy, and engage with the inquiry process (Barton and Levstik, 2004, pp. 210–211). Historical empathy proves an important aspect to students' historical thinking because affective learning allows students to connect with historical figures and gain new perspectives understanding difficult situations (Endacott, 2010, p. 6).

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this notable trade book lesson plan is a multimodal analysis of art forms (photography, music and dance choreography) which culminates in the students taking informed action to create a personal mural to “bear witness” to an issue of their selection.

Findings

This is a National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) notable trade book lesson plan. After engaging with this lesson, students will gain skills in visual decoding, empathy, critical thinking and collaboration. The students will use higher-order thinking to take informed action by creating a mural to “bear witness” to injustice.

Originality/value

The value of this lesson plan is the ability to integrate written themes from the text, visual learning and hands-on learning in a meaningful and authentic way to students. Allowing the students to take informed action using the knowledge gained about “bearing witness” proves crucial for young students learning how to actively participate in America's multi-cultural democracy.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Bert de Vries and John Warmerdam

Focuses on how to fit on‐the‐job training activities into theorganization of work, a problem area which will be gaining importanceover the next few years when the training…

Abstract

Focuses on how to fit on‐the‐job training activities into the organization of work, a problem area which will be gaining importance over the next few years when the training load may become an important bottleneck when training policy is implemented. Investigates what reactions actually are to this fitting‐in problem, using an ITS study as a starting‐point which shows that a whole range of instruments are employed at management level to prevent or meet capacity problems: regulation of training moments, planning of training periods, spreading or limiting study leave, enlarging individual and departmental flexibility, limitation of the output (quality) and, if none of these things help, employing outside staff. The choice of instrument is mainly determined by: nature and organization of the work done in the department; the size of the workload; and the extent to which leave cumulates. If these instruments are applied adequately, the “burdens” of training do not necessarily have to slow down further growth in training.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 16 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Calvin A. Kent

In a very real sense, the title of this article is overwhelming. The volume of writing both scholarly and otherwise on this subject would deter anyone who seriously sought…

Abstract

In a very real sense, the title of this article is overwhelming. The volume of writing both scholarly and otherwise on this subject would deter anyone who seriously sought to assimilate it all. Despite the repeated Biblical appeal for unity among the Church members, there is perhaps no issue which more deeply divides the Christian Church today than economic policies which are advocated as being consistent with the teachings of both the New and the Old Testament.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Abstract

Details

The Emergence of the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-994-7

Abstract

Details

Continuous Change and Communication in Knowledge Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-034-5

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Witold Kwasnicki

The author presents a comparative study of the three evolutionary economic schools, namely the Austrians, neo-Schumpeterians, and institutionalists. The comparison is…

Abstract

The author presents a comparative study of the three evolutionary economic schools, namely the Austrians, neo-Schumpeterians, and institutionalists. The comparison is based on an analysis of nine basic features of the evolutionary process and evolutionary approach, including a dynamical view of economic phenomena (seen from a historical perspective), a focus on far-from-equilibrium analysis, a proper and realistic perception of time, and a population perspective (to what extent emergent properties are results of interaction among economic agents). The relevant features of the evolutionary process are the heterogeneity and behavior of economic agents, the search for novelty based on a concept of economic agents’ hereditary information, a selection process (based on the concept of rivalry), spontaneity of development, and the presence of decision-making procedures (how economic agents make decisions, and to what extent their subjective values play a role). The goal of the comparative analysis is to estimate the level of “evolutionary content” of the three schools. My subjective evaluation suggests that only the Austrian school can be called entirely evolutionary. Slightly less evolutionary are the neo-Schumpeterians, and the least evolutionary are the institutionalists.

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Terrence H. Witkowski

This study aims to present a history and critical analysis of arms and armor collecting in America from the late 19th century until the present day.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a history and critical analysis of arms and armor collecting in America from the late 19th century until the present day.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws from the literature on arms and armor, from primary written, visual and material evidence, and from the author’s long experience as an antique gun and sword collector.

Findings

American arms and armor collectors have included men of great wealth, museums and their curators and many enthusiasts of more modest means. Collectors, dealers and curators have created a substantial arms literature. Collectors have organized around various types of artifacts, historical periods and company brands. Dealers, auction houses and manufacturers have provisioned the market with period pieces and reproductions.

Originality/value

The history of antique arms and armor collecting is regarded as a social activity where enthusiasts have pursued “serious leisure” through consumption and brand communities. This history is further analyzed as a cultural practice wherein generations of collectors have interpreted the meaning of antique arms and armor.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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