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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Marjolein Berings, Rob Poell and John Gelissen

The purpose of this paper is to gain more insight into employees' on‐the‐job learning. Its specific purpose is to develop and validate a classification of on‐the‐job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain more insight into employees' on‐the‐job learning. Its specific purpose is to develop and validate a classification of on‐the‐job learning activities and learning themes, focusing on the nursing profession in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

Two successive studies were conducted for this purpose. In the first study in‐depth interviews with 20 Dutch nurses were analysed using a grounded theory approach. The content validity of the categories found in the first study was investigated in the second study by interviewing 17 supervisors and eight educators from different hospitals in The Netherlands.

Findings

The paper finds that the main categories of learning activities are: learning by doing one's regular job, learning by applying something new in the job, learning by social interaction with colleagues, learning by theory or supervision, and learning by reflection. First‐order learning activities and second‐order learning activities can be distinguished. The main categories of on‐the‐job learning themes are: the technical‐practical domain, the socio‐emotional domain, the organisational domain, the developmental domain, and a pro‐active attitude to work.

Research limitations/implications

The validation study was conducted by the same researchers as the first study. The findings are based on one profession (nursing) in one country (The Netherlands).

Practical implications

The categories can be used by nurse educators and health sector managers/trainers to develop comprehensive and structured intervention methods for the improvement of on‐the‐job learning which do justice to the complexity and diversity of on‐the‐job learning by nurses. HR (development) professionals can use the classification as part of a competence management and development system.

Originality/value

The study provides a detailed, complete and multi‐dimensional explication of nurses' on‐the‐job learning activities and learning themes, grounding the classification and framework in empirical data and using multiple data sources.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2007

María A. García-Valiñas, Roberto Fernández Llera and Benno Torgler

Do people prefer a society with an extensive social welfare system with high taxes, or low taxes but lax redistributive policies? Although economists have for a long time…

Abstract

Do people prefer a society with an extensive social welfare system with high taxes, or low taxes but lax redistributive policies? Although economists have for a long time investigated the trade-off mechanism between equity and efficiency, surprisingly little information is available about citizens' preferences over the distribution of income in a society. The aim of this paper is to address this shortcoming by identifying, in an empirical study using the World Values Survey, what shapes individuals' preferences for income equality in Spain. We present evidence that social capital is a key determinant to understanding preferences towards redistribution and equality.

Details

Inequality and Poverty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1374-7

Abstract

Details

Shaping Social Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-251-0

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2007

Michael Shalev

The difficulties that MR poses for comparativists were anticipated 40 years ago in Sidney Verba's essay “Some Dilemmas of Comparative Research”, in which he called for a…

Abstract

The difficulties that MR poses for comparativists were anticipated 40 years ago in Sidney Verba's essay “Some Dilemmas of Comparative Research”, in which he called for a “disciplined configurative approach…based on general rules, but on complicated combinations of them” (Verba, 1967, p. 115). Charles Ragin's (1987) book The Comparative Method eloquently spelled out the mismatch between MR and causal explanation in comparative research. At the most basic level, like most other methods of multivariate statistical analysis MR works by rendering the cases invisible, treating them simply as the source of a set of empirical observations on dependent and independent variables. However, even when scholars embrace the analytical purpose of generalizing about relationships between variables, as opposed to dwelling on specific differences between entities with proper names, the cases of interest in comparative political economy are limited in number and occupy a bounded universe.2 They are thus both knowable and manageable. Consequently, retaining named cases in the analysis is an efficient way of conveying information and letting readers evaluate it.3 Moreover, in practice most producers and consumers of comparative political economy are intrinsically interested in specific cases. Why not cater to this interest by keeping our cases visible?

Details

Capitalisms Compared
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-414-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Kueh Hua Ng and Rusli Ahmad

Substantially few or no known empirical studies have explicitly focused on the higher-order construct of motivation in human resource development (HRD), namely, motivation…

Abstract

Purpose

Substantially few or no known empirical studies have explicitly focused on the higher-order construct of motivation in human resource development (HRD), namely, motivation to improve work through learning (MTIWL) as a mediator linking personality traits and social support to training transfer. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to redress the inadequacy by exploring the role of MTIWL as a mediator on such relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Consistent with positivism, quantitative data based on self-rating were collected from 131 trainees attending management training programs organized by a public sector training provider in Malaysia.

Findings

The findings indicate that personality traits (i.e. conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness) and social support (i.e. perceived organizational support and peer support) influenced training transfer via the mediating role of MTIWL. Supervisor support, nonetheless, was not a significant predictor of training transfer through MTIWL.

Originality/value

This study focuses on a more holistic motivational construct than simple motivation in HRD. The focus on MTIWL extends the existing understanding of the underlying motivational influences that link dispositional and situational factors to training transfer in occupational settings.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Johanna Mair and Nikolas Rathert

Social enterprises have long been considered ideal settings for studying hybrid organizing due to their combination of social and economic goals and activities. In this…

Abstract

Social enterprises have long been considered ideal settings for studying hybrid organizing due to their combination of social and economic goals and activities. In this chapter, the authors argue that the current research focus on hybrid organizing foregrounds the paradox, conflicting logics, and multiple identities associated with the pursuit of multiple goals but underappreciates the relationship between hybrid organizing and its institutional context. Recognizing that the primary objective of social enterprises is to tackle social problems, the authors introduce the social problem domain as an analytically useful and theoretically interesting meso-level to examine the role of context for hybrid organizing and to advance conversations on hybridity in organizational theory. Social problem domains offer insights into the political, cultural, and material differences in how various societies deal with social problems, which in turn affects hybrid organizing. The authors provide empirical insights derived from an analysis of social enterprises across three countries and social problem domains. The authors show how the institutional arrangements of social enterprises differ considerably across contexts, and how these arrangements affect how social enterprises become more or less similar compared to traditional ways of organizing in these problem domains. Based on these findings, the authors outline a research agenda on social enterprises that focuses on examining the nature, antecedents, and outcomes of hybrid organizing around social problems across multiple levels of analysis. With this chapter, the authors move the focus of social enterprise research in organizational theory from studying how these organizations cope with multiple logics and goals toward studying how they engage in markets for public purpose.

Details

Organizational Hybridity: Perspectives, Processes, Promises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-355-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2012

Veronika V. Eberharter

This paper analyzes the impact of family background characteristics and social exclusion features on the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment and…

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of family background characteristics and social exclusion features on the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment and income positions, and the relative poverty risk in Germany and the United States. These countries vary widely by welfare regime, family role patterns, and labor market settings. From these differences we predict higher intergenerational income elasticities in the United States and higher intergenerational educational elasticities in Germany. Using longitudinal data from the Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF) 1980–2008, we find some empirical support for these hypotheses. In both countries, parental educational attainment stimulates intergenerational economic and social mobility, which accentuates the importance of promoting human capital accumulation.

Details

Inequality, Mobility and Segregation: Essays in Honor of Jacques Silber
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-171-7

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Jorge Grau Rebollo, Paula Escribano Castaño, Hugo Valenzuela-Garcia and Miranda Jessica Lubbers

The purpose of this paper is to explore the care provision of charity organizations that assist people in situations of economic vulnerability. After analyzing central…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the care provision of charity organizations that assist people in situations of economic vulnerability. After analyzing central theoretical elements of kinning, the authors contend that charity organizations function as symbolic families for people in need.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethnographic fieldwork was performed in two sites of a large catholic charity organization in the outskirts of Barcelona. Ethnographic fieldwork included participant observations and informal interviews with individuals located under the official poverty threshold.

Findings

Symbolic family bonds among different individuals are created through the entwining of interconnectedness, obligation and commitment, sense of belonging, interdependence and the projection of symbolic spaces of hearth. The authors propose the term of “disposable families” (akin to that of Desmond’s, 2013 for dyadic relationships) because a remarkable feature of these bonds is its short-term nature.

Social implications

The consideration of charities as symbolic families offers new insights into their social role and may contribute to reshaping the social function within emergency situations.

Originality/value

This research opens new ground for the understanding of charities as something else than care providers, as the relational dimension with clients extends beyond the conventional patron/client relationship. This fact has particular relevance in an economic context of post-crisis, with the Welfare State withdrawal and a deterioration of the traditional sources of informal support.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2018

Talat Islam and Ishfaq Ahmed

This study aims to investigate the mechanism between perceived organizational support and transfer of training using self-efficacy and job satisfaction as mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the mechanism between perceived organizational support and transfer of training using self-efficacy and job satisfaction as mediating variables. More specifically, self-efficacy is examined as a mediator between perceived organizational support and job satisfaction, whereas job satisfaction is examined as a mediator between perceived organizational support and transfer of training.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative study is based on data collected from 409 employees of the banking sector on a random basis.

Findings

Structural equation modeling analysis confirmed the mediating role of job satisfaction between perceived organizational support and transfer of training. In addition, self-efficacy was found to perform the mediating role between perceived organizational support and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The data for this study were collected at one point of time, and it has implications for organizations and employees.

Originality/value

This study highlights the emerging issue of transfer of training and gives a practical model to the organizations to strengthen their human resources. This study is perhaps the first attempt to empirically investigate the mediating role of self-efficacy and job satisfaction.

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Abdul Rahim Zumrah and Stephen Boyle

The role of perceived organizational support (POS) and job satisfaction on the effectiveness of transfer of training in the workplace has begun to receive attention among…

Abstract

Purpose

The role of perceived organizational support (POS) and job satisfaction on the effectiveness of transfer of training in the workplace has begun to receive attention among recent studies. However, there is still limited understanding of how these factors may work together to affect the transfer of training. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by exploring the relationship between POS, job satisfaction and transfer of training.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of this study have been collected from a group of employees, and their supervisors through survey. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings reveal that job satisfaction mediates the relationship between POS and transfer of training.

Originality/value

This study suggests that POS can improve employees’ job satisfaction, which in turn increase transfer of training in the workplace. The significant relationship between the factors (POS – job satisfaction – transfer of training) is an important finding that has not been empirically determined previously, particularly in the transfer of training literature. The findings show that job satisfaction plays an essential role as a mediator in the relationship between POS and transfer of training.

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