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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Lee M. Dunham and John Garcia

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of firm-level investor sentiment on a firm's share liquidity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of firm-level investor sentiment on a firm's share liquidity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use Bloomberg's firm-level, daily investor sentiment scores derived from firm-level news and Twitter content in a regression model to explain the variability in a firm's share liquidity.

Findings

The results indicate that improvements (deterioration) in investor sentiment derived solely from Twitter content lead to a decrease (increase) in the average firm's share liquidity. Results, although not as strong, are opposite for investor sentiment derived solely from news articles: improvements (deterioration) in news sentiment leads to an increase (decrease) in the average firm's share liquidity.

Research limitations/implications

The proxy for share liquidity is the bid-ask spread, which may be an imperfect measure of liquidity. The Amihud illiquidity measure was used as an alternative proxy and yield similar results. The results have important implications for investors in assessing the determinants of share liquidity.

Practical implications

The sample period covers four years (2015–2018), which is determined by the availability of the Bloomberg sentiment data.

Social implications

Investors increasing use of social media to express views on particular stocks and seek information that might be used in the investment decision-making process. The study links investor sentiment derived from social media (Twitter) to share liquidity.

Originality/value

By examining the relationship between a firm's sentiment and the firm's share liquidity, this paper advances the authors' understanding of the factors that drive a firm's share liquidity. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to link investor sentiment derived from firm-level news and Twitter content to a firm's share liquidity.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Barbara A. Zsembik, Greg L. Drevenstedt and C. Preston McLane

Using data from the 1990 Latino sample of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the 1988 National Survey of Elderly Hispanics, this research examines ethnic variation in…

Abstract

Using data from the 1990 Latino sample of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the 1988 National Survey of Elderly Hispanics, this research examines ethnic variation in the economic well‐being of older Latinos. Older Puerto Ricans are less economically secure than Cubans or Mexican Americans, reporting lower median incomes, higher rates of poverty, and disproportionate enrollments in the state health insurance program. We decompose household income into its sources to provide insight in ethnic differences in economic security and highlight how federal cutbacks in social programs for the elderly will uniquely impact each Latino ethnic group. The results show that older Puerto Ricans remain most vulnerable to the negative consequences of changing social policies. Health insurance coverage varies by ethnicity, revealing that access to health care is most limited among older Cubans. Clearly, each Latino ethnic group present a distinctive economic profile for older adults, profiles which call for policies guarding economic security to be tailored to each ethnic group.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sarel Lavy, John A. Garcia and Manish K. Dixit

The purpose of this paper is to identify key variables that affect the quantifiable key performance indicators (KPIs) and to derive equations to measure these indicators…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify key variables that affect the quantifiable key performance indicators (KPIs) and to derive equations to measure these indicators. Qualitative KPIs are also discussed in terms of the aspects that need to be covered while carrying out qualitative performance assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of literature and an industry opinion-based qualitative approach is applied to develop equations to calculate the quantifiable KPIs. A facility asset management consulting firm is included in the process of deriving the equations. Key aspects of a facility's qualitative performance assessment are categorized and discussed by performing a literature review.

Findings

Mathematical expressions for core performance indicators are presented and discussed along with key variables. In addition, the information needed to quantify these core indicators is also discussed.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents the second step towards establishment of a relevant list of quantifiable and measurable core KPIs, which were identified and categorized in Part I of this paper. In Part II, the authors derive equations to quantify the core KPIs. Future research is needed to use relevant information from industry for validating these equations.

Practical implications

A need for a concise and relevant list of KPIs was identified in Part I of this paper. Part II provides an approach to quantify the core KPIs based on information that is available in the industry. This research will help facility management professionals in not only selecting the indicators of choice, but also quantifying them based on available information yielding enhanced facility management decisions with measurable facility performance outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper provides equations and variables to measure a facility's physical, functional and financial performance using both quantitative and qualitative performance assessments.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sarel Lavy, John A. Garcia and Manish K. Dixit

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the previously established list of key performance indicators (KPIs), to identify and categorize the core performance indicators…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the previously established list of key performance indicators (KPIs), to identify and categorize the core performance indicators that are measurable and quantifiable.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature-based qualitative approach is adopted for accumulating desired information on identifying and categorizing the core indicators. The list of KPIs established in an earlier paper is narrowed down considering the future research needs suggested by the literature.

Findings

The quantifiable and measurable core indicators are identified and categorized in the form of a list. The core indicators are defined and the variables required to quantify them are described by citing peer-reviewed literature.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents the first step toward establishing a relevant list of quantifiable and measurable core KPIs. Future research papers could emphasize derivation of mathematical expressions for determining the identified core KPIs and validating these KPIs using simulation of real building data.

Practical implications

The need to establish a concise and relevant list of quantifiable and measurable KPIs that could express more than one type of information about a facility's performance is identified in this paper. This paper presents and describes a narrowed down list of core KPIs, which could be utilized by facility management industry professionals while performing a holistic performance assessment.

Originality/value

This paper provides a list of core KPIs that could express more than one aspect of a facility's performance and that is measurable and quantifiable.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 April 2021

Sharmila Pixy Ferris and Kathleen Waldron

Abstract

Details

Higher Education Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-230-8

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Abstract

Details

Progress in Psychobiology and Physiological Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-542118-8

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2011

Venice Thandi Sulé

The literature on women of color (WOC) faculty is replete with accounts of marginalization (Balderrama, Texeira, & Valdez, 2006; Benjamin, 1997; Garcia, 2005; John, 1997;…

Abstract

The literature on women of color (WOC) faculty is replete with accounts of marginalization (Balderrama, Texeira, & Valdez, 2006; Benjamin, 1997; Garcia, 2005; John, 1997; Li & Beckett, 2006; McKay, 1997; Reyes, 2005). For instance, Balderrama et al. (2006) explains, “I come from a family of survivors, but I never realized it would come to that in academia …Little did I know I was entering one of the bastions of conservative ideology and practices – a far cry from a meritocracy working for the public good” (Balderrama et al., 2006, p. 224). Concomitantly, the higher education literature extols the presence of race and gender diversity because they are associated with elevated learning outcomes and intercultural engagement (Chang, 2002; Gurin, 1999; Milem & Hakuta, 2002). Therein lies the quandary. Given the importance of illuminating the challenges that WOC face within the academy, how then can that discourse be broadened to include empirical and theoretical claims about the relationship between WOC agency and structural transformation? In other words, how can WOC move beyond or within structural constraints to contribute to the teaching and learning environment? Equally important, how does the presence of WOC encourage a diversity conversation beyond student learning outcomes to one that emphasizes social equity? This chapter intends to participate in these emergent conversations in two ways. First, drawing from an empirical study of Black female faculty, I discuss how the participants contributed to their institutions and how those contributions embody and expand on the following diversity narratives: structural access and climate, learning outcomes, intercultural competencies, and meritocracy. Second, I theoretically expound upon the Black female faculty findings to discuss implications for similarly situated WOC. In all, this chapter demonstrates that difference – a woman of color difference – dislodges reactionary strongholds within the academic enterprise.

Details

Women of Color in Higher Education: Changing Directions and New Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-182-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2020

Oscar Malca, Jean Pierre Bolaños, Francisco J. Acedo, Jorge Luis Rubio Donet and Jesus Peña-Vinces

The purpose of this study is to analyse the mediating and moderating effects of relational flexibility norms on relationship building capacities and export performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyse the mediating and moderating effects of relational flexibility norms on relationship building capacities and export performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed a quantitative and cross-sectional approach. The analysis was applied to 95 Peruvian Exporting SMEs which were examined through structural equation modelling (SEM) using AMOS 24.0 statistical package. The responses were gathered through telephone and personal interviews which were tested using the Mann–Whitney U test, finding no statistically significant differences.

Findings

The main finding of the study is to demonstrate the indirect effect of relational flexibility norms on the export performance of SMEs through relationship-building capabilities. In this way, these capabilities become very important variables in the export management of SMEs, since they directly affect the relationship of the Exporter–Importer dyad.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations is the cross-sectional type study that applies to the short-term effects of relational norms. Organizational characteristics and other factors that may affect export performance should also be considered in future research, as well as longitudinal studies should be developed.

Practical implications

The study allows SMEs to focus management efforts on strengthening the relationship – building capabilities, which are very important given SMEs' resource constraints. Therefore, an adequate management of relations with importers can contribute to the reduction of control and coordination costs; and have a positive impact on export performance. Similarly, the study contributes to the management of export promotion by suggesting that one area to be prioritized is the strengthening of the relationship capacities of exporting SMEs.

Originality/value

The study provides the analysis of the mediating effect of the relationship-building capability between relational flexibility and export performance. In this way, it enriches the theoretical analysis and contributes with the empirical evidence of an emerging country like the case of Peru.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

John Motloch, Pedro Pacheco and John Vann

To build awareness of an emergent global network of sustainability consortia, the network's Sustainability for the Americas (SFTA) regional cluster, its pilot US‐Brazil…

Abstract

Purpose

To build awareness of an emergent global network of sustainability consortia, the network's Sustainability for the Americas (SFTA) regional cluster, its pilot US‐Brazil Sustainability Consortium (USBSC), its subsequent North American Sustainability, Housing and Community Consortium (NASHCC), the process through which these consortia are emerging and evolving to sustained implementation, planned parallel academic and project funding tracks, and models, tools and techniques used for knowledge transfer. To build awareness of an emergent global sustainability network of multi‐national consortia of universities and non‐institutional partners created to promote sustainability and innovation that connects people, ideas, and resources for a sustainable future; and to invite people interested in multi‐national partnering to enter into a dialogue that can lead to emergence of a multi‐national consortium.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper establishes the need for key universities to lead society to a sustainable future. It builds understanding of the role of international partnering, global networking, global media networking, multi‐sector partnering, and sustainability consortia in this leadership. It identifies efforts of the Land Design Institute (LDI) at Ball State University and key partners to facilitate emergence of a global network of sustainability consortia. It reviews the model through which these consortia are emerging and evolving to sustained implementation, including the model's parallel academic and project funding streams. It focuses on the SFTA initiative, including its pilot consortium, as a case‐study in phased emergence and evolution to sustained implementation of these consortia. It presents the consortia model for integrating internal and external knowledge networks; and processes, tools, and techniques used by consortia to lead society to a sustainable future. It reviews the model's nested curricula and international collaborative partnership approach to building sustainability leadership. It builds on experiences to date in this pilot consortium to make suggestions for future consortia.

Findings

Paper findings include the relative ease of consortium emergence, seeding, implementation start‐up, and acquiring academic funding; relative difficulty of achieving sustained implementation and project funding; increased awareness of the need for project seeding; and a new understanding of the catalytic benefits of consortia, including increased faculty interaction, development, and productivity including professional papers, journal articles, and proposals for external funding.

Originality/value

The paper fulfills the need for effective models, processes, tools and techniques for international partnering to lead society to a sustainable future.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Sarel Lavy, John A. Garcia and Manish K. Dixit

The purpose of this paper is to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) and categorize them based on specific aspects of facility performance measurement in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) and categorize them based on specific aspects of facility performance measurement in order to facilitate a holistic performance assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach, based on the literature, is adopted. This approach relies on an extensive literature search of extant research papers, assessment reports, surveys and presentations to identify KPIs. The KPIs are arranged in appropriate categories based on their purpose and content.

Findings

The paper identifies indicators for performance measurement and classifies them into four major categories: financial, physical, functional, and survey‐based. Indicators are arranged from general to the most specific indicators. The list presents indicators with their description, units of measurement, and literature sources.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could focus on further analysis of the list of KPIs in order to generate a more concise list of easily measurable indicators that exhibit wide applicability and valid categorization.

Practical implications

The lack of proper categorization hampers frequent and widespread use of performance metrics by the industry. This study proposes a list of KPIs and presents it in appropriate categories so it can be used more practically by facility management practitioners.

Originality/value

The list of KPIs generated covers aspects of facility performance assessment and shows wider applicability; thus, it could be utilized by practitioners for a holistic assessment of a wide range of facilities.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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